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  #1  
Old 03-06-2018, 09:05 PM
wade63 wade63 is offline
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Default parlor ID help (reposting)

Had to repost because Pbucket took my photos. Anyways a friend brought in this very nice sounding parlor and I told him my friends at agf may be able to id it. Not original bridge, solid top, mirror shows # 2322, no bindings, chunky v neck, lite as a feather, sweet big tone. Any imput appreciated.[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 03-07-2018, 05:57 AM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
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Missing the original bridge makes this a tougher than usual guitar to ID given the nondescript features. About all I an say with any kind of certainty is the reverse gear tuners place the guitar as pre-1930 although you will still see them into the early 1930s. Regal numbered their models in the 2XXX's but I am sure so did others. Sorry I could not help you much.
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Old 03-07-2018, 09:45 AM
Bax Burgess Bax Burgess is offline
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Did this receive a neck reset? Just curious.
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Old 03-07-2018, 01:51 PM
wade63 wade63 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bax Burgess View Post
Did this receive a neck reset? Just curious.
Saw just the slightest glue or finish residue so if so an excellent job, sweet action. One guitar shop speculated Washburn. Owner regrets replacing bridge said original bridge was similar but thicker to the outer edges.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:04 PM
TKT TKT is offline
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Thicker to the outer edges as in a flattened pyramid? I'd guess Washburn too.

I'm thinking the extra slender upper bout is a little bit more so than any of my typical circa 1920s parlors. I have a Washburn, Lyon and Healy, Supertone, and an old all solid mahogany no name that looks like a Regal or Harmony. Plus a little larger no name in Brazilian. All have a little more swell and width to the upper bout. I'd wonder if it's maybe because this is older, circa 1900 - 1915.
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Old 03-07-2018, 08:58 PM
wade63 wade63 is offline
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I'd agree. The slender lower bout seems to be earlier, thanks.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:05 AM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
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The problem is it would take an expert's eye to determine the maker of the guitar as basically the same guitar would have been built by Lyon & Healy, Stewart, Regal and others and often sent out to distributors which sold them under a myriad of names. The flattened pyramid bridge is distinctive of a Washburn made up to at least the early-1920s. But you will see the same bridge on other Lyon & Healy guitars as well as say instruments built by the Larson Bros.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:55 AM
ship of fools ship of fools is offline
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It is not a Washburn almost all had a center spline running down the center back and I went through all of my pictures and descriptions and found some similar but they all had the center spline and all had a decorative inlay running down the back and those that didn't did not match up.And most were made with Rosewood so it helps narrow down things.
And couldn't find anything similar to the Regal family so I would look at Stewart as I couldn't see anything in the Lyon & Healy that was like this especially with the bridge description so doesn't leave a lot does it Also tried to see if Tonk had anything similar but alas nothing there either that jumped out at me.
18 fret guitars are mostly made at around 1880's to 1900 but like all things there were some exceptions so it makes it even more difficult.Also are there other pics as someone mentioned glue showing and do we have actually measurements unfortunate for me have no Larson another question does it have any tailpiece holes on the bottom.

Last edited by ship of fools; 03-08-2018 at 08:08 AM. Reason: more info
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:54 PM
wade63 wade63 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ship of fools View Post
It is not a Washburn almost all had a center spline running down the center back and I went through all of my pictures and descriptions and found some similar but they all had the center spline and all had a decorative inlay running down the back and those that didn't did not match up.And most were made with Rosewood so it helps narrow down things.
And couldn't find anything similar to the Regal family so I would look at Stewart as I couldn't see anything in the Lyon & Healy that was like this especially with the bridge description so doesn't leave a lot does it Also tried to see if Tonk had anything similar but alas nothing there either that jumped out at me.
18 fret guitars are mostly made at around 1880's to 1900 but like all things there were some exceptions so it makes it even more difficult.Also are there other pics as someone mentioned glue showing and do we have actually measurements unfortunate for me have no Larson another question does it have any tailpiece holes on the bottom.
I noticed that spline on washburns too. I'm going to get more/better pics from my friend. I'm surprised the serial #s on the block didn't look familiar. Thanks for the thoughtfulness. This guy also has an original '68 Tele, not a collector but hangs on to stuff. See if he will email some more pics or bring it over again. I'll try to get more info on the original bridge too.
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:23 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is offline
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I agree with Ship (and his little buddy, Rowboat,) that it could be a Stewart. The Fairbanks company also made guitars in addition to banjos, and this might be one.

Wadeboy, I sure hope those are either silk and steel or else extra lights on that guitar: many of the guitars that we now think of as “parlor” guitars were actually designed for gut strings, not steel. Pin bridges were originally used for gut strings: the player would tie a knot in the end of the gut string and use a bridge pin to hold it in place. Steel strings with ball ends that can be used with pinned bridges were a later adaptation.

Given the likely vintage of that guitar, there’s at least a 50/50 chance that it was braced for gut strings, not steel.

Anyway, it’s a nice little guitar. Back when I was a starving young musician, I had a chance to buy a cherry condition Lyon & Healy gut string parlor for $50 that played and sounded like a dream. But I knew that for the music I was playing a steel string guitar would be more suitable, so I bought a solid wood Harmony Triple O copy for the same money.

The Harmony was the correct choice, much more practical for what I was doing, but I’ve never forgotten that sweet little Lyon & Healy gut string.


Wade Hampton Miller
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:37 PM
wade63 wade63 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade Hampton View Post
I agree with Ship (and his little buddy, Rowboat,) that it could be a Stewart. The Fairbanks company also made guitars in addition to banjos, and this might be one.

Wadeboy, I sure hope those are either silk and steel or else extra lights on that guitar: many of the guitars that we now think of as “parlor” guitars were actually designed for gut strings, not steel. Pin bridges were originally used for gut strings: the player would tie a knot in the end of the gut string and use a bridge pin to hold it in place. Steel strings with ball ends that can be used with pinned bridges were a later adaptation.

Given the likely vintage of that guitar, there’s at least a 50/50 chance that it was braced for gut strings, not steel.

Anyway, it’s a nice little guitar. Back when I was a starving young musician, I had a chance to buy a cherry condition Lyon & Healy gut string parlor for $50 that played and sounded like a dream. But I knew that for the music I was playing a steel string guitar would be more suitable, so I bought a solid wood Harmony Triple O copy for the same money.

The Harmony was the correct choice, much more practical for what I was doing, but I’ve never forgotten that sweet little Lyon & Healy gut string.


Wade Hampton Miller
Thanks Wade I was wondering about gut strings myself. He does have steel strings on there. I'll get some more info and keep posting. The good thing is hes a guitar lover and not a seller, just interested in the origins of the guitar and yeah if it was a special guitar does make one prize it more.
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  #12  
Old 03-09-2018, 08:06 AM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ship of fools View Post
It is not a Washburn almost all had a center spline running down the center back and I went through all of my pictures and descriptions and found some similar but they all had the center spline and all had a decorative inlay running down the back and those that didn't did not match up.And most were made with Rosewood so it helps narrow down things.
And couldn't find anything similar to the Regal family so I would look at Stewart as I couldn't see anything in the Lyon & Healy that was like this especially with the bridge description so doesn't leave a lot does it Also tried to see if Tonk had anything similar but alas nothing there either that jumped out at me.
18 fret guitars are mostly made at around 1880's to 1900 but like all things there were some exceptions so it makes it even more difficult.Also are there other pics as someone mentioned glue showing and do we have actually measurements unfortunate for me have no Larson another question does it have any tailpiece holes on the bottom.

As you note, the problem is there are way too many exceptions to any rule when it comes to these guitars. I own a 1930s Regal with 18 frets and no center spline. Although there is nothing to ID the guitar, in this case, the headstock is a dead giveaway. I do agree though, based on the guitars I have owned, that the lack of a center spline seems to be more commonly associated with guitars built with maple, birch and oak bodies than those with mahogany bodies.
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