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  #31  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:43 AM
markm2553 markm2553 is offline
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I wish some of the places I have played put in half the thought you have already! Looks like they asked the right guy.
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  #32  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:48 AM
KevWind KevWind is offline
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Originally Posted by Marty C View Post
Please tell me you guys are joking about this group ASCAP. Most all of us sing some covers. You mean this is an issue? How is it that 100+ venues in Nashville do the 16 hours per day?
First there is a lot of misunderstanding and a fair amount of non objective thinking, often with a hint of unrealized hypocrisy, associated with this "issue"

PRO's (Performing Rights Organizations) are not a "joke"
Nore is the notion of protecting the intellectual property rights of songwriters and publishers .


When businesses or organizations utilize music in any fashion, that has copyrights attached to it, they are legally obligated to pay the fees associated with the use of that music. Unless and until they can qualify or negotiate an exemption'
So most likely The 100 + venues in Nashville you speak of , simply pay those fees as part of their operating business expenses.

And yes it is an "issue" when they do not, and yes it has been widely abused in the past .
Not to mention PRO's have a fiduciary responsibility to their members to attempt to collect copyright fees.

With some exception, most open mic's are taking place in a business establishment or organization facility and in objective practical terms the function serves to create awareness of, and or, bring traffic to that establishment (much like any other form of advertizing) even if they don't much or any profit from the Open Mic itself.

Most people who complain about performing rights fees, would never consider not getting paid themselves , to do whatever it is they do, to make a living. Yet hypocritically think that copyright holders should just exactly that, not get paid.
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Last edited by KevWind; 12-06-2017 at 10:24 AM.
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  #33  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:54 AM
RustyAxe RustyAxe is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmsstrider View Post
1. Should I place the Bose on the ground and use the tower or raise up on a table. I am afraid the base will get lost at floor level. I don't have access to a raised platform.
No, leave it on the floor. You might even get some coupling with the "stage" that would accentuate the bass. Really, you'd be better off to run the bass through a small bass combo amp.

Quote:
2. Which mic?. I am thinking the E835 might be best.the Shure could be too Hot?
Try them both.

Quote:
3. Should I eliminate all the pedals and just go straight to the mixer?
Yes

Quote:
4. Should I provide a stool for those that like to play seated?
5. Anything else?
Yes, supply a stool or seat of some sort. You should also expect to handle duos (and maybe trios) on vocals. See how it goes and who shows up.

ASCAP, BMI, SESAC ... these performance rights are the responsibility of the venue. I'd not worry about it unless they come after the venue, in which case the owner either pays up or shuts down the music.

Performers who need a preamp/DI (most will not) should bring their own. That's how it works around here, except at those "open jam" things where an entire band plays and brings the entire kit.

Remember, it's an open mic. Keep it simple. It doesn't have to be studio quality ... and in my experience, never is.
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  #34  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:55 AM
MikeBmusic MikeBmusic is offline
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Good advice from everyone so far. Especially 'keep it simple'. Remember that many people that show up at an open mic are inexperienced performers are they'll be expecting you to help and encourage them.

Make sure you have a regular 1/4"-1/4" guitar cable (and a spare) to plug people in (they won't bring their own), and a spare mic cable, just in case one of yours fails.

A stool for the performer to sit - and a chair, too, because sometimes shorter people are not comfortable with their feet off the floor!

A music stand - and a small light that clamps onto it, unless the overhead lights are good in this store. Many OM performers need one.

When I was running my first OM, I quickly realized that one thing I needed was a DI combo pedal that let me mute the guitar signal quickly, rather than having to run over to the PA board and mute the channel (which didn't mute the monitor, you wont' have one, so not a concern). That's why I got my Radial PZ-Pre - it'll accommodate an active or passive pickup - actually 1 or 2 guitars at one time, and provides a quick way to mute before players unplug themselves.

Seating 70-80? Unless this is a great 'listening venue' that others know about, expect a rather small turnout as you start. Give the performers 15 minutes or 3 or 4 songs, even if you only have a few players show up, then rotate, and restart the rotation to fill the time. Greet everyone who comes in, get them signed up (I prefer going in sign-in order, rather than set times).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty C View Post
Please tell me you guys are joking about this group ASCAP. Most all of us sing some covers. You mean this is an issue? How is it that 100+ venues in Nashville do the 16 hours per day?
Those Nashville venues all pay for their PRO license (BMI/ASCAP/SESAC).

If this OM continues as a regular thing and you do any 'advertising' (facebook, social media, etc), the PRO guys will find you eventually.
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  #35  
Old 12-06-2017, 09:09 AM
rmsstrider rmsstrider is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBmusic View Post
Good advice from everyone so far. Especially 'keep it simple'. Remember that many people that show up at an open mic are inexperienced performers are they'll be expecting you to help and encourage them.

Make sure you have a regular 1/4"-1/4" guitar cable (and a spare) to plug people in (they won't bring their own), and a spare mic cable, just in case one of yours fails.

A stool for the performer to sit - and a chair, too, because sometimes shorter people are not comfortable with their feet off the floor!

A music stand - and a small light that clamps onto it, unless the overhead lights are good in this store. Many OM performers need one.

When I was running my first OM, I quickly realized that one thing I needed was a DI combo pedal that let me mute the guitar signal quickly, rather than having to run over to the PA board and mute the channel (which didn't mute the monitor, you wont' have one, so not a concern). That's why I got my Radial PZ-Pre - it'll accommodate an active or passive pickup - actually 1 or 2 guitars at one time, and provides a quick way to mute before players unplug themselves.

Seating 70-80? Unless this is a great 'listening venue' that others know about, expect a rather small turnout as you start. Give the performers 15 minutes or 3 or 4 songs, even if you only have a few players show up, then rotate, and restart the rotation to fill the time. Greet everyone who comes in, get them signed up (I prefer going in sign-in order, rather than set times).


Those Nashville venues all pay for their PRO license (BMI/ASCAP/SESAC).

If this OM continues as a regular thing and you do any 'advertising' (facebook, social media, etc), the PRO guys will find you eventually.
We have yet to have under 50 at any of our seminars, so I am hoping for the best.
My mic stand has a music/tablet holder and clip on light.
I have plenty of spare cables
I like the PZ-Pre, but can't invest in one now. I will have to just make everyone aware to let me know before they unplug and stand by the board for muting.
I like sitting myself, so will have a bar stool on hand.
What could possibly go wrong LOL!
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  #36  
Old 12-06-2017, 09:28 AM
varmonter varmonter is offline
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You have a wealth of ideas and suggestions here.
I too second the use of a di box.
Organization is key to a successful om.
You will always have late arrivers you should strive to get them on.
I agree get a sign up sheet. This allows performers
to look ahead an know when there time is near.
Save you from chasing them down( which you may
Want to do despite the list) and saves setup time.
It also gives performers a sense of order and helps
with the "oh let him go now .,I'll go later"
Be respectful of everyone . Dont bump folks
for better players. Try your best to get everyone
Up there. Post a sign up time say 7pm. This may
Discourage late arriving people but it helps
You know how to manage the time. If you start
With let's say 2 hrs and 4 people that's 1/2 he
Per performer so the first hour goes by and
Six more Musician's show up wanting to play.
So now you have 8 folks to fill an hr That's now
2 songs each. You see how this can get out
Of hand. I always tried to be fair and equal to
My performers. Regardless of ability ..It keep them coming back.

Last edited by varmonter; 12-06-2017 at 09:35 AM.
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  #37  
Old 12-06-2017, 06:20 PM
jseth jseth is offline
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I would suggest you definitely err on the side of "keeping it simple"...

-The Bose on the floor (bass frequencies s p r e a d and are non-directional, so the bass will move through the room!) and ONLY use the two inputs on the Compact whenever possible.

-Have the ability (with the set-up) to accommodate folks who need a 1/4" high impedance input for their guitars, as the VAST majority of acoustic guitars with pickups will want this! If you can do this with your mixer, great... if not, just use the two inputs on the Bose and the performer will have to "make do' with that... they will sound just fine through the Bose rig.

-Have one vocal mic, and it should be decent, but not one you'd be heartbroken were it damaged... have a second mic as a back-up, as well for a second singer. I don't think you even need reverb on the vocal or guitar, not for one or two songs each... but, if you MUST have FX, then you should dial them in PRIOR to the performers getting up there. If you let THEM decide what they want, you will never get much music played!

-A good Open Mic is the epitome of "plug in and play", and you should do everything you can to facilitate that experience! The more streamlined you get the set-up, the faster folks can just walk up and play...

I don't even think you need the "lighted music stand"... for just a couple songs, remembering the ones you're playing is a good litmus test/requirement for the fledgling Open Mic participant... THEY should know their material, it's part of being/learning to be, a performer!

(Believe me, I still remember when it was a really BIG deal for me to have three songs I could play, without looking at any sort of lyric or chord sheet... folks who want to get out and play will get into learning their songs well enough to come play your OM...)

I believe that with very little work beforehand, anyone who sits down will sound wonderful through the Bose Compact. Do you remember how good it sounded when YOU first played through one? They are surprisingly easy to work with and achieve a great sound...

Good luck! Let us know how it goes...

As a few of these events go by, you may have a few "special" performers. I think it's fine to give a bit of "special treatment" to them, but not at the exclusion of the others that want to play... you're running the show, so you get to decide...
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  #38  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:25 PM
lweb10 lweb10 is offline
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I would strongly recommend not trying to use the meridian mic in this setting. I like mine but it needs way too much fiddling around (which takes up too much time) to use in an open mic setting. Open mic performers can be tough on equipment and my meridian doesn’t strike me as the most robust piece of equipment I own. Use one of the other mics on a boom - fewer ways it can go haywire and much easier to adjust from one player to another.
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  #39  
Old 12-09-2017, 12:02 PM
Gordon Currie Gordon Currie is online now
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I was surprised, when I played open mikes again after decades out of the scene, that almost everyone who shows up has a pickup of some sort in their acoustic guitar. In fact, it's more likely that you have TWO guitars needing to be plugged in than ONE needing a microphone.
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  #40  
Old 12-09-2017, 03:44 PM
troggg troggg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Currie View Post
I was surprised, when I played open mikes again after decades out of the scene, that almost everyone who shows up has a pickup of some sort in their acoustic guitar. In fact, it's more likely that you have TWO guitars needing to be plugged in than ONE needing a microphone.
Yeah but pickups and batteries fail which is why you need mic backup.
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  #41  
Old 12-09-2017, 04:03 PM
guitaniac guitaniac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg View Post
Yeah but pickups and batteries fail which is why you need mic backup.
And you need a mic because some folks are still miking their instrument(s). I've only heard of pickups being mandatory in certain Nashville open mics or "writers nights" where they apparently are so swamped with acts that they need to minimize setup time.
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