The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-28-2017, 08:13 PM
gimme789 gimme789 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 994
Default lowering action on an 000-15M

Picked up a used Martin 000-15M. Great guitar, but the action is just a little bit high. I called Martin to ask how to lower it. They said to take out the saddle and sand it down. The action will be lowered at the twelfth fret by about two times whatever you sand off. He said no need to mess with the truss rod.

Has anyone here ever done this ? Doesn't sound too difficult, but figured I'd check here before trying it. I initially thought the truss rod would need to be tweaked.

Thanks in advance,,,,,
__________________
http://www.acousticgallery.com

MostlyElectric

Acoustic

Martin D18 (1970), Yamaha LS6

Last edited by gimme789; 11-28-2017 at 08:21 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-28-2017, 10:32 PM
tdq tdq is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,135
Default

Other more expert feel free to chime in, but I'm pretty sure that your action will go down by HALF the amount you take off the saddle. The truss rod is for relief, not action, which are two different things. Care must be taken to keep the saddle absolutely flat on the bottom. Something that I struggle with!
__________________
Composite Acoustics GX-HG
National Resophonic NRP 12 Fret
Loar LH-700-VS Archtop
Herrmann Weissenborn
Recording King RP-10
Maton 425 12-string
Stella Tenor
ESP 400 series telecaster
My Youtube
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-28-2017, 11:19 PM
StevenL StevenL is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Monroe, Louisiana
Posts: 1,326
Default

I sanded my saddle a bit and filed the nut slots to right above first fret height. The nuts on both my 000-15M an my D28 were too high. Felt much better after the adjustments.

And I did adjust my relief. The amount of relief for any particular guitar is not cut in stone. Some may want less, with plenty of room on the middle frets for hard strumming; some may want the neck as flat as possible without buzz for light playing. If you do want to adjust yours, you'll have to get one of the elongated allen wrenches since the nut is way up inside the neck. About 3-4 inches I think.

tdq is right. If you want to reduce the string height at the 12th fret by 1/32", you'll need to file off 2/32".

My 000 is a marvelously easy player now. Great guitars.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-29-2017, 12:06 AM
Tony Done Tony Done is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Toowoomba, Australia
Posts: 1,990
Default

I've done it a fair few times. My way is to mark how much I want to take off on the bass and treble sides - it is often different - then hold the saddle in a vise, using the vise jaws as a file stop. I then take off the excess with a coarse file, which takes about a minute, and finish by rubbing on a flat file or on medium abrasive paper stuck to a sheet of glass with carpet tape.

Last edited by Tony Done; 11-29-2017 at 12:23 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-29-2017, 04:03 PM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,483
Default

Quote:
I initially thought the truss rod would need to be tweaked.
It may. Check straightness of the neck with a straightedge, or by pressing the string down on the first and 12th frets. You need a tiny amount of clearance (relief) at the 5th or 6th fret. This is usually about 0.006", or the thickness of two sheets of paper.
Adjust the relief with the truss rod before modifying the saddle.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-29-2017, 04:21 PM
Ed-in-Ohio's Avatar
Ed-in-Ohio Ed-in-Ohio is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Northeast Ohio, USA, Planet Earth
Posts: 3,581
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
It may. Check straightness of the neck with a straightedge, or by pressing the string down on the first and 12th frets. You need a tiny amount of clearance (relief) at the 5th or 6th fret. This is usually about 0.006", or the thickness of two sheets of paper.
Adjust the relief with the truss rod before modifying the saddle.
^ - Bingo! Then, after setting the proper relief, as mentioned above, you'll need to remove 2X from the bottom of the saddle to reduce the string action by X.

Here's an excellent video on the process from MacNichol Guitars. FYI, Michael at MacNichol sells great replacement bone saddles through his Reverb shop. (No financial interest on my part, just a satisfied customer).

__________________
2017 Alvarez Artist AJ80CE Maple Jumbo - FOR SALE
2016 Alvarez Artist A-E Folk/OM - FOR SALE

c.1966 Regal Sovereign R235 Jumbo - Old Dollar
2009 Martin 000-15 - Brown Bella
1977 Gibson MK-35 - Apollo
2017 Fender Custom American Telecaster - Brown Sugar
1995 Fender 'David Gilmour' Stratocaster - Crazy Diamond
Think Hippie Thoughts...
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-18-2017, 08:44 PM
gimme789 gimme789 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 994
Default

I looked at the neck, and it did not seem (to my eyes) to require a truss rod tweak. After making some measurements and marks, I sanded down the saddle. Re-strung and happy to say it plays great!, with good intonation everywhere.

Thanks for all the replies. The info was helpful.
__________________
http://www.acousticgallery.com

MostlyElectric

Acoustic

Martin D18 (1970), Yamaha LS6
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=