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  #46  
Old 08-20-2023, 09:04 AM
Deliberate1 Deliberate1 is offline
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Originally Posted by phavriluk View Post
David, you're playing 'Deep River Blues' four years in??? That's my idea of magical, profound, success. I think you've done very well indeed!
Many thanks for the kind words. I will not bore you with my story, too often told here (and inappropriate thread appropriation). But I got my first guitar in 2019 just before the pandemic hit. That put an end to all my other musical outlets (I am a life-long jazz woodwinds player). So the guitar had my undivided, unexpected attention. And then, retirement came my way two years later. So, I really think of those four years of playing, as 32 - in dog years equivalents. The guitar is a jealous mistress....
Thanks again. Progress, yes. I suppose satisfaction should come from a look in the rear view mirror, rather than the windshield. As R. Frost wrote, "miles to go before I sleep." Hopefully.
Cheers.
David
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Last edited by Deliberate1; 08-20-2023 at 03:05 PM.
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  #47  
Old 08-20-2023, 09:23 AM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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Originally Posted by Tuch View Post
An acoustic guitar can be set up ''equally'' to 'play' like an electric guitar!if you know how!!!
Tell us how.
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  #48  
Old 08-20-2023, 06:59 PM
AgedPassion AgedPassion is offline
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Default I've stopped making progress and I need some ideas for how to beat this plateau

Hi HF,

I don't post much, as there are such a Large number of people here that are much more Knowledgeable & Experienced here than me in many areas of Acoustic Guitar..

Though, I believe I can fairly easily See & Feel your sense of Difficulty & Frustration, and also your Sincerity, in searching for options to help with your Playing Progress.

I hope you don't Quit.


Keep it Simple & Continue Learning!.

Try to keep on Experimenting with New Lessons & Techniques.


Take it Easy.. Have Fun!.. ..life can be short!..




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Another Strong Belief - EveryThing (& EveryOne too) Changes!..
Sooner,, or Later,,, to a Greater or Lesser Extent, or Degree...
(Shortened Version) Earl (acknowledged - mid 1970s).. ..DOB - November 1949

Last edited by AgedPassion; 08-24-2023 at 02:33 AM. Reason: edited for clarity and content
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  #49  
Old 08-21-2023, 08:58 AM
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I suppose there are people who may know a piece very well (fully memorized, have worked out any technical issues (rough spots) and are able
to be playing to phrases (able to think ahead to where they are currently playing in anticipation of the comming notes)) and still have timing problems.
However I suspect very few do when the prior mentioned things have been worked out.
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Woods hands pick by eye and ear
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  #50  
Old 08-31-2023, 02:43 PM
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
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If you're interested in learning to fingerpick, check out Steve's free site. Download some beginner tab and have 'at 'er. The longest journey starts with a single step.


https://www.stevemcwilliam.co.uk/guitar/index.htm
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  #51  
Old 09-01-2023, 01:43 AM
schmalex schmalex is offline
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I haven’t been playing guitar long enough to have reached any sort of height, let alone a plateau…

But I do have experience with that kind of thing with my piano playing and I always found the best things to get over that mental hurdle were to slow down and focus on specific fundamentals like techniques, counting, etc and probably most importantly to reward yourself for your time spent learning difficult pieces by playing easier pieces now and then. Sometimes you just need that break doing something else but still practice related.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseflesh View Post
I actually have a couple of electrics. I stopped playing with them when I got an acoustic. "This is so much harder, it must be better for me," I told myself. Maybe I should dust them off.
Also, what kind of acoustic guitar to you have? And have you taken it to a guitar shop / luthier for a setup? My guitar was much more difficult to play before I took in for a setup. I had actually given up on it for a long time before that due to my complete inability to play any sort of barre chord without my finger just muting the strings. Once I got the setup done, it felt like a completely different guitar.

Last edited by schmalex; 09-01-2023 at 02:03 AM.
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  #52  
Old 09-19-2023, 09:30 PM
Horseflesh Horseflesh is offline
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I haven't replied to the thread in a while but I owe y'all an update for your thoughtful replies. I have been pondering this a lot and I have read every reply thoughtfully even if I don't reply to each of you.

You may be happy to hear that I have not thrown my guitar into the forest. While the feeling may return I have gotten over it for now and rediscovered some of the fun. I picked up the electric guitar again, learning melodic lines there was a nice change from acoustic rhythm guitar.

My instructor (who is also a friend) is helping me to adjust my attitude. It's my nature to be picky and hard on myself... Not great qualities when learning a difficult skill.

I know that playing with other people is one of the best, or the best thing I can do to improve. It's the top answer in countless threads much like this which I have stumbled on. It's the top advice from my instructor buddy. It's just a very difficult thing to take on. I only know a handful of players and they are all good players. Gigging players. Real players. Being the absolute worst person in the group is never fun, even if it's good for you. It would just feel like the Pity Circle (band name?) and not a jam. I gotta find an "old guys who suck at guitar" group to jam with.

@schmalex you need only be an inch up to find a plateau, I assure you!

My acoustic guitar is a Yamaha AC1M and unfortunately, I cannot blame the setup. It's fine. Low action, strung with 11s. No issues. Checked by a real guitarist, too. I can't blame the equipment, though I AM really curious to try a guitar with a wider nut.
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  #53  
Old 09-24-2023, 06:27 PM
Arapaho G Arapaho G is offline
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You will be sorrier if you quit than you are with your current playing ability. It takes what it takes. Everyone is different. If you know someone that is at about your same level or a little higher play together. Even strumming chords with someone else will make you better at it. Don't quit unless you feel it's just not what you want and can walk away with no regret.
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  #54  
Old 09-24-2023, 08:01 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseflesh View Post
My instructor (who is also a friend) is helping me to adjust my attitude. It's my nature to be picky and hard on myself... Not great qualities when learning a difficult skill.

I know that playing with other people is one of the best, or the best thing I can do to improve. It's the top answer in countless threads much like this which I have stumbled on. It's the top advice from my instructor buddy. It's just a very difficult thing to take on. I only know a handful of players and they are all good players. Gigging players. Real players. Being the absolute worst person in the group is never fun, even if it's good for you. It would just feel like the Pity Circle (band name?) and not a jam. I gotta find an "old guys who suck at guitar" group to jam with.
Your instructor has got to know some old-ish folks at/near your playing level. Have you asked them? I live in a small town and we have 3 acoustic jams a week to attend.
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  #55  
Old 09-27-2023, 08:10 AM
Charlie Bernstein Charlie Bernstein is offline
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Get a mandolin. It's amazing what it'll teach you.
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  #56  
Old 09-27-2023, 10:48 AM
Horseflesh Horseflesh is offline
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> Your instructor has got to know some old-ish folks at/near your playing level. Have you asked them? I live in a small town and we have 3 acoustic jams a week to attend.

She has looked but can't find beginner-appropriate jams in our area, and is actually trying to find a venue to host one. (Most of her students are a lot younger, too.)

> Get a mandolin. It's amazing what it'll teach you.

In what way? With different fingerings for everything I figured it would just be disruptive.
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  #57  
Old 09-27-2023, 11:23 AM
Ryan51 Ryan51 is offline
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Ideally when going from chord to chord you want to do it smoothly with little or no gap between chords. Until getting to that point practice chord changes slowly at first. Initially finger the lowest notes of the chord first and let the rest of your fingers follow across the strings. Since most chord changes start with a down strum you will be hitting the lowest note of the chord first so when that note needs to be fingered it is necessary to have it in place first. Let the rest of your fingers fall into place as quickly as possible going from the lowest to highest strings. With practice the fingers will fall into place very quickly and then in time pretty much simultaneously. I see so many beginner guitarists randomly.positioning their fingers on a chord in no real order. Another thing beginners often do is strum all six strings no matter what chord they are playing. If you play an E, G, or F chord that is fine. When playing an A or C chord you want to begin your strum from the 5th string and avoid hitting the low E. Target the 4th string when playing a D chord. While you can sometimes play a low G or E note in a C chord, low E in an A chord, or add the open A to a D chord initially practice these chords targeting the root note first.

Btw, I currently have a self-taught older student who tries to cheat by cutting off a chord early and then positioning her fingers on the next chord ahead of the beat. Hopefully I can break her of this habit.

Last edited by Ryan51; 09-27-2023 at 11:42 AM.
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  #58  
Old 09-27-2023, 06:31 PM
JackC1 JackC1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan51 View Post
Btw, I currently have a self-taught older student who tries to cheat by cutting off a chord early and then positioning her fingers on the next chord ahead of the beat. Hopefully I can break her of this habit.
If one doesn't move before the beat, then how can one hit it on the beat?

I've always thought that it is more important to get the strum on the beat than late; even if I have to cut the previous chord shorter than I want (e.g. on some more difficult chord changes).
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  #59  
Old 09-27-2023, 06:33 PM
JackC1 JackC1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseflesh View Post
> Get a mandolin. It's amazing what it'll teach you.

In what way? With different fingerings for everything I figured it would just be disruptive.
Have you considered an ukulele? There are many newbie ukulele jams around me and zero guitar ones. That might be a possibility to find playing partners. (Also, the skills transfer pretty easily between the uke and guitar.)
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  #60  
Old 09-27-2023, 06:38 PM
Horseflesh Horseflesh is offline
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> If one doesn't move before the beat, then how can one hit it on the beat?

That's what I was thinking. You have to move a little ahead... right?

> Have you considered an ukulele? There are many newbie ukulele jams around me and zero guitar ones.

I do have a uke but never thought about that, thanks.
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