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  #16  
Old 01-02-2021, 03:20 AM
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Wrighty Wrighty is offline
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Default Classical guitar - is it a good idea to have one around for steel string players?

I am a recent convert to nylon, from being a dyed in the wool fingerstyle steel string player. I was drawn by the tone and the variety of new music available that I love to listen to (Andrew York for example)

Having made the transition I can certainly concur with the view that they are very different instruments and that playing nylon well requires a firm commitment. I have however noticed a positive crossover in my steel string playing - particularly in my right hand.

I appreciate the focus and attention to detail that nylon players dedicate to tone production and enjoy this process.

I can see me playing more nylon than steel for the foreseeable future, as I learn the instrument, but imagine it will re-balance after a time.
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2021, 09:17 AM
FrankHS FrankHS is offline
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Default Edit....

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankHS View Post
An oft-quoted reference in (sometimes inaccurrate) American pop-culture is, "If you have to inquire the price, then (maybe)
"You cannot afford it."

PS, I added word "maybe," because throughout life, we often change our minds about what a reasonable price ought to be.
Need to walk back my own comments. OP said "Classical guitar" which I took to include "classical guitar technique." However, i now see OP maybe only meant "a nylon string sound" which may have nothing to do with new learning committment. So-called crossover nylon seems to not require a technique overhaul. And maybe Willie Nelson has earned a $1 million with a flatpick on nylon string. (I mean, just on flatpicked nylon solos, subtracting out the rest, if possible.)
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  #18  
Old 01-02-2021, 09:17 PM
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Cecil6243 Cecil6243 is offline
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Doesn't Willy Nelson strum a classical guitar hence the damage due to a lack of a pick guard?

Last edited by Cecil6243; 01-03-2021 at 02:50 PM.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2021, 06:36 AM
FrankHS FrankHS is offline
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Originally Posted by Cecil6243 View Post
Doesn't Willy Nelson strum a classical guitar hence the damage to a lack of a pick guard?
Is it really "damage" to have made it a part of one's legend? (Including semi-famous repairs!)
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2021, 07:02 AM
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Dak's comments about piano are spot on.

I stared in 2005, and at this point, I can hold my own on 88 keys. It forced me to read music, which I was really never keen on spending the time doing properly.

as for nylons I would never be without one. I love what can be done on them. They are not the same as steel string.
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  #21  
Old 01-03-2021, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
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Is it really "damage" to have made it a part of one's legend? (Including semi-famous repairs!)
I see your point but it's still damage.
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2021, 03:05 AM
ObiWanSymbian ObiWanSymbian is offline
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Changes and new impulses will definitely improve you as a musician.

Should you go for piano/classical/crossover, I cannot tell you that.

It very much depends on what you are looking for.

The crossovers have radiused fingerboard and are mostly used plugged-in, hence tone production is not as important. Often they are 14-fret instruments and lack the sweetness of a typical classical guitar.

Classical guitar will give you a whole new spectrum of repertoire to choose from. And may want you to dive deeper into its own domain. More so than a crossover.

As for prices... my first classical was ca $500 , all solid instrument. Good enough to let me develop my skills and reward me for the time invested.

Definitely go all-solid and an instrument that can handle hard tension strings. Have it set up properly, so that tone production can really be made.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2021, 06:47 AM
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I took classical 50 years ago long enough to realize that true classical was just not me. However, it was time well spent to learn technique.
I still play my classical frequently. There are songs, particularly Christmas songs, that just sound better on nylon.
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2021, 02:55 PM
whvick whvick is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cecil6243 View Post
Doesn't Willy Nelson strum a classical guitar hence the damage due to a lack of a pick guard?


Willie likes what Willie likes
He wanted a gypsy jazz sound
It is even more interesting than you can imagine. I thought like you for years, but then had some time to kill and listed to some YouTube about Willie and trigger.
Willie, who is in his 80s, says when Trigger dies he retires.
I have now listened enough to know that Willie is no hacker or just strummer. He can play!
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2021, 05:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whvick View Post
...
Willie, who is in his 80s, says when Trigger dies he retires....
I claim "Or vice versa." And agree with you "Willie is no hack." To me, the more interesting thing is how he surrepticiously blended his love for Django into some of his guitar licks, and the country music world is no worse for the wear.
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Last edited by FrankHS; 01-04-2021 at 06:00 PM. Reason: Who cares?
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  #26  
Old 01-04-2021, 09:54 PM
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I play both classical and steel string guitars. When I first went to the classical in the early 1990’s it took me a couple of years to get the tone I wanted,,definitely takes a different stroke of the fingers. However, it gave me a better tone on my steel string, so I’m happy it all worked out. I also play 5 string banjo bluegrass style with finger picks & thumb pick, so switching back & forth between the 3 used to be difficult, but no more. Chet Atkins played on both classical and steel string guitars.
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  #27  
Old 01-05-2021, 09:50 PM
starchase starchase is offline
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Default Playing Again

I guess this is as good a time/place as any for a first post. Yesterday I threw off my laziness and pulled my 2 guitars out of the corner where they've been collecting dust (inside their cases) and string corrosion. I hadn't even opened the cases in a few years and its been much longer since I've played them. But dang-it its stupid to let a Martin D28 (1969) lie fallow, and a Guild Mark II (1977 for $251 incl. hardshell case) whimper for attention. I decided to play the Guild and actually learn some beginner classic guitar pieces. I found some of my old books and am determined if I dedicate playing time each day I think I can get used to playing again.

I've been playing for my own enjoyment since late 1960s. I bought the Martin from my brother for $300 or $350 so he could go hitchhiking around the US. But the neck now has such a bad warp, the strings are just too high off the neck starting around the 10th fret its pretty much unplayable. The nylon string however sounds great and feels fine.

So wish me luck in what I call basically starting over with an old love. I'll enjoy reading posts on the forums. And I still have the Guild price list from 1977 that I made into PDF form; some Guild fans may be interested for history.

John
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  #28  
Old 01-06-2021, 12:30 AM
ObiWanSymbian ObiWanSymbian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starchase View Post
I guess this is as good a time/place as any for a first post. Yesterday I threw off my laziness and pulled my 2 guitars out of the corner where they've been collecting dust (inside their cases) and string corrosion. I hadn't even opened the cases in a few years and its been much longer since I've played them. But dang-it its stupid to let a Martin D28 (1969) lie fallow, and a Guild Mark II (1977 for $251 incl. hardshell case) whimper for attention. I decided to play the Guild and actually learn some beginner classic guitar pieces. I found some of my old books and am determined if I dedicate playing time each day I think I can get used to playing again.

I've been playing for my own enjoyment since late 1960s. I bought the Martin from my brother for $300 or $350 so he could go hitchhiking around the US. But the neck now has such a bad warp, the strings are just too high off the neck starting around the 10th fret its pretty much unplayable. The nylon string however sounds great and feels fine.

So wish me luck in what I call basically starting over with an old love. I'll enjoy reading posts on the forums. And I still have the Guild price list from 1977 that I made into PDF form; some Guild fans may be interested for history.

John

All the best in your journey!!!
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  #29  
Old 01-06-2021, 05:43 AM
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I have both. I love them both for different reasons. My classical is a modern style with a ton of volume but a sweeter treble register. For South American music it presses all the right buttons. The steel string is perfect for blues and folk arrangements. They are different tools for your tool box.

Cincy
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  #30  
Old 01-06-2021, 09:21 AM
Don W Don W is offline
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I bought an entry level classical last year. It was reccomended to me by my fingerstyle (steel string) mentor and teacher of many years. It is really a nice guitar for cheap money (Yamaha CG142 $275...hard to believe the quality - solid Engleman spruce top and Nato wood back and sides). The reason for his suggestion was that my shoulder was getting bad and I needed to play off of my left leg instead of the right. My steel string guitar is almost a dreadnaught size and it is difficult to manage between my legs. The full size classical is smaller and works well. I really liked the tone and got used to the new classical sitting position..so I took the opportunity to learn standard notation and some classical pieces...it has been wonderful. So what was originally a reaction to shoulder pain turned into a new passion. Now I still play a lot of steel string but when I want to or if my shoulder starts to act up again I just switch to the classical for a while. My instructor uses this same classical for all of his lessons and some song writing to save his hands and arm from further damage from more than 50 years as a professional guitarist. It is great to have a classical around as it reinforces good hand position. I use liquid gel nails done at the local salon for steel string and classical. If I were only playing classical I would probably be using a different type of nail that allows for the flesh and the nail to strike the string at the same time. For steel string I like a little longer and harder nail thus the liquid gel rounded correctly and polished smooth.
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