The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Classical

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:35 AM
imc2111 imc2111 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 340
Default Classical guitar - is it a good idea to have one around for steel string players?

I like the way classical guitars sound, and the idea of having a guitar with a very different tonal palette to steel string is quite alluring.

However, I find that it takes a bigger effort to switch from metal strings to nylon, as the attack and feel is very different. Going from an electric guitar to steel string acoustic is a very easy transition, but nylon strings are different.

Iíve been interested in having a nylon string for a while, but I sometimes think it wouldnít be a good investment of my practice time to be switching between two very different feeling instruments.

As a most here are steel string players, what do you think about nylon string guitars?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:43 AM
Emil Emil is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Gothenburg Sweden
Posts: 423
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by imc2111 View Post
I like the way classical guitars sound, and the idea of having a guitar with a very different tonal palette to steel string is quite alluring.

However, I find that it takes a bigger effort to switch from metal strings to nylon, as the attack and feel is very different. Going from an electric guitar to steel string acoustic is a very easy transition, but nylon strings are different.

Iíve been interested in having a nylon string for a while, but I sometimes think it wouldnít be a good investment of my practice time to be switching between two very different feeling instruments.

As a most here are steel string players, what do you think about nylon string guitars?
It does not interest me at all.
I dont care for how they sound, how the play and i dont listen to any music that involves classical/Spanish guitars so it does not trigger me to play or learn tunes on them either.
But they look nice
__________________
Just a dumb swede
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:46 AM
cmac cmac is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Scotland
Posts: 401
Default

I had one for a number of years but recently sold it due to lack of use. You could always buy a used one and if it doesn't work out then you won't lose much.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:51 AM
GTRGUY005 GTRGUY005 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: UES, NYC, USA
Posts: 659
Default

I just bought a nylon for the reasons you are thinking about it. Itís a whole new world of sound, feel, technique and material to play. I didnít spend much on it so if it doesnít stick....oh well.

So far I am enjoying feeling like a beginner again.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:54 AM
The Bard Rocks The Bard Rocks is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Mohawk Valley
Posts: 6,292
Default

For my first 16-17 years I had a classical one for most all the time. I played it less than 30-some years later, I was given a very high quality one - and found I had difficulty playing it. I loved the sound but found little use for it with what I was playing, so a few years later sold it. I think I am cured... but still like the sound.
__________________
The Bard Rocks

Kinnaird 000 Adk/Ziricote
Sexauer L00 Adk/Magnolia
Hatcher Jumbo Bearclaw/"Bacon" Padauk
Leach "Arctos" OM Millenium Sequioa/Macassar Ebony
Goodall Jumbo POC/flamed Mahogany
McAlister baritone Adk/Bubinga
Appollonio 12 POC/Myrtle
MJ Franks Resonator, all Australian Blackwood
'31 National Duolian
banjos of all kinds, mandolin, autoharp, tiple...
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-01-2021, 06:56 AM
Kerbie Kerbie is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 24,573
Default

I love classical... guitars and music. I started on a classical a hundred years ago, so the change isn't much of a leap. I love the tone. I find it easy to listen to and easy to play. I see no downside. I think playing a classical can make a steel-string player better at drawing out the desired tone.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-01-2021, 07:42 AM
pieterh pieterh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Near Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,455
Default

I have an old beginner Landola classical that I rescued from a container. It needed a new saddle and new tuners.

As you and others have said, itís a different tonal palette and a different feel. That said, classical technique is always worth working on as it will cross over and benefit steel string playing. I go back every now and then and work through some Carcassi ťtudes - the wider string spacing becomes obvious when doing some of the exercises!

Iíd say go for it and see how it goes. If your budget stretches to it go for one of the modern takes on the nylon, like Taylor or Furch, where the difference in fingerboard width isnít as extreme as a ďregularĒ classical. At some point I want to get one of these to add to my collection. The Landola is ok to practice on but not much else.
__________________
Gibson ES-335 Studio 2016; Furch OM34sr 2015; Fender MiJ Geddy Lee Jazz bass, 2009; Taylor 414CE 2005; Guild D35 NT 1976; Fender MIM Classic 60s Tele 2008; Fender US Standard Strat 1992; G&L ASAT classic hollowbody 2005; Ibanez RG350MDX 2010(?); Ibanez Musician fretless, 1980s; Seymour Duncan Tube 84-40; Vox AC4TV;

Ex-pat Brit in Sweden
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-01-2021, 08:27 AM
AndreF AndreF is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,137
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by imc2111 View Post
I like the way classical guitars sound, and the idea of having a guitar with a very different tonal palette to steel string is quite alluring.

However, I find that it takes a bigger effort to switch from metal strings to nylon, as the attack and feel is very different. Going from an electric guitar to steel string acoustic is a very easy transition, but nylon strings are different.

Iíve been interested in having a nylon string for a while, but I sometimes think it wouldnít be a good investment of my practice time to be switching between two very different feeling instruments.

As a most here are steel string players, what do you think about nylon string guitars?
You make some very insightful points imo.
I think thatís the basic reason steel stringers will get a nylon string guitar, i.e. they like the sound of it, but then give up on it because they wonít commit the time and effort it takes to reproduce the sound which attracted them to it in the first place.
This applies mostly to fingerstyle players.
Itís not a knock. To produce good, pleasing tone out of a nylon string guitar requires a different technique, or at least a modified one, which anyone can learn. But you have to commit to it.
If you just go from steel to nylon without that change, chances are good it will not sound nearly as good as what you liked about it in the first place. And then the interest fades.

Ironically, I think youíd be better off not being a finger style player and thinking about it so much, and just play the thing with picks or electrically, or whatever. Because they do sound different and can be a lot of fun. Just get Segovia out of your mind and go for your own unique nylon sound. Then chances are the guitar will get a lot more play.
__________________
Best regards,
Andre
Golf is pretty simple. It's just not that easy.
- Paul Azinger

http://www.youtube.com/user/Gitfiddlemann
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-01-2021, 08:49 AM
Ozarkpicker's Avatar
Ozarkpicker Ozarkpicker is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 1,133
Default

Iíve heard several great players say they took lessons from classical teachers to develop proper chord fingering & keep a classical guitar around to keep their fingers trained.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-01-2021, 09:18 AM
rllink's Avatar
rllink rllink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Midwest
Posts: 876
Default

I bought one in Spain in the seventies. I played it two years and didn't know it was a classical guitar. I thought it was just a cool guitar with a slotted head and nylon strings.
__________________
If I'm wrong, please correct me. I'm still learning.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-01-2021, 09:42 AM
TBman's Avatar
TBman TBman is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 29,004
Default

I got bit by the classical bug last year. I always wanted a halfway decent one so my wife got me a Cordoba. The problem for me was that I don't like having nails so I play with flesh only and that just doesn't really cut it for the classical tone.
__________________

Barry


Marble Halls {William Coulter}:


Celtic covers - videos

https://soundcloud.com/barry329


Avalon L2-320C, Guild D-55, Guild D-120C, Gibson J-45, Larrivee OM-05, Martin D-16GT

Alvarez ap66sb, Cordoba C5, Seagull Folk, Washburn D-10S

Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-01-2021, 10:23 AM
Dak Dak is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 15
Default

If your interest is not in the results of playing the nylon string guitar but in cross-training to improve your skill and understanding of music, I don't think you are going nearly far enough.

A nylon string guitar isn't that different from a steel string. I suggest you take up the piano. The piano allows you to play 2 independent voices with ease, one or both of them can be full chords. The layout aids with understanding theory. It's easier to learn/improve reading skills on it. Probably almost every person in the last 300 years who composed any kind of music for other people to play did it on a keyboard.

I bought a digital piano less than 2 yrs ago and am already amazed with what I can do, and how much I learned beyond where I would be if I had just continued only playing guitar.

Probably the most signficant cross-training effect I've noticed on guitar is time compression. On piano, I have learned to pay attention to melody on one hand, chords on the other, making decisions about what to do with both at the same time. When I go back to guitar, doing basically only one thing at a time with both hands, it seems like time is slowed, and I have plenty of time to look ahead, focus on sound and technique details, etc...
__________________
La Patrie Presentation
Yamaha P121 Digital Piano
Simon & Patrick Natural Elements Amber Trail Folk
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-01-2021, 12:57 PM
FrankHS FrankHS is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 466
Default It depends...

An oft-quoted reference in (sometimes inaccurrate) American pop-culture is, "If you have to inquire the price, then (maybe)
"You cannot afford it."

PS, I added word "maybe," because throughout life, we often change our minds about what a reasonable price ought to be.
__________________
Cordoba C10 Cd/In (2014)
Mossman '73 Flint Hills (dreadnaught)
Ryoji Matsuoka M30 classical
https://m.soundcloud.com/frank-hoops...ad-a-brain-arr

Last edited by FrankHS; 01-01-2021 at 01:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-01-2021, 02:11 PM
BoneDigger's Avatar
BoneDigger BoneDigger is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 5,999
Default

I have found that classical guitar is quite useful for me in many ways. I record my own music and sometimes a classical guitar can give you a tone that you simply cannot get anywhere else. My nylon/classical is more of a folk classical and is built a bit more sturdy and robust than a typical classical guitar.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-01-2021, 04:06 PM
Villamarzia Villamarzia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 877
Default

If you are currently playing fingerstyle on steel, a classical is a very nice addition to your palette and will push your technique into new territories. I am daily switching between steel and nylon. I own 3 guitars: a steel which I keep in dadgad, a classical in drop D and a flamenco in standard tuning. I think classical technique helped me to achieve a bigger tone also on steel, better finger articulation and posture (which is fundamental for good tone and good technique).
__________________
Marco
"If want to be happy, be." (L.Tolstoj)
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Classical

Thread Tools





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=