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  #1  
Old 09-22-2020, 03:20 PM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Default Archtop bridge hunt for Cromwell

I have some feelers out locally, but in case they don't produce, I'm looking for a bridge for a newly acquired Cromwell G4. It came with a bridge that's clearly smaller than the original, based on pictures online, and, well, take a look:



It doesn't have to be vintage, or even faux-vintage. But ideally it would be 5 1/4 by 3/4 inches, and make contact with the top along the length of its base. No feet (or whatever they're called) as the current bridge sports.

PS...the FON stamped on the inside back is 799B. Can any of you experts date --- Edit: according to reverb.com, it's a 1936.

Last edited by upsidedown; 09-23-2020 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 09-22-2020, 07:24 PM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
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It may look funny but if the feet are making good solid contact and the tone is good, its doing its job. My bridges for my Eastman meet the desired length but are more like 3/8" wide vs your desired 3/4". That's pretty wide. I would have a luthier carve that desired base dimension and place the posts to match the existing saddle.

You'll have to fit any bridge base you get or make anyway.
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Old 09-22-2020, 08:47 PM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandobart View Post
It may look funny but if the feet are making good solid contact and the tone is good, its doing its job. My bridges for my Eastman meet the desired length but are more like 3/8" wide vs your desired 3/4". That's pretty wide. I would have a luthier carve that desired base dimension and place the posts to match the existing saddle.

You'll have to fit any bridge base you get or make anyway.
Thanks.

I'm not against bridges with the feet, it's more that the tan line on my guitar suggests that the original didn't have them.
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Old 09-22-2020, 09:03 PM
sunra sunra is offline
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This will give you an idea of what the brisge should look like https://jakewildwood.blogspot.com/20...chtop.html?m=1. If you search sited like eBay for vintage Gibson bridges (Gibson made the Cromwells) you might find one. You could also try looking for a Kalamazoo bridge.
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Old 09-23-2020, 11:01 AM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunra View Post
This will give you an idea of what the brisge should look like https://jakewildwood.blogspot.com/20...chtop.html?m=1. If you search sited like eBay for vintage Gibson bridges (Gibson made the Cromwells) you might find one. You could also try looking for a Kalamazoo bridge.
Yes, I read and watched that carefully before going to check out the Cromwell. It was good advertising!

Slightly deeper dive into Internetland produced this source, which I'll look at:

https://www.guitarpartsresource.com/gbridge_wood.htm

Last edited by upsidedown; 09-23-2020 at 03:16 PM.
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Old 10-21-2020, 12:51 PM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Default Found, acquired, installed..

Following up on this thread with a photo and a question.

In discussions with seller, specified that I wanted a bridge with 2 1/4" string spacing, and was pointed in the direction of the one I bought. It was "custom trimmed and slotted" and shipped.

Here's where I'm looking for opinions. See picture below.

Yes, its spacing is 2 1/4", but I was under the impression I'd be getting a bridge made specifically for that spacing; whereby the strings would be slotted in the center of each - tooth(?) - and not pushed over to the outside edges of the E's.

Yes, it works fine and as far as I know, makes no difference to the overall functioning of the guitar. But, I'm curious; did I ask/pay for a specific bridge and receive a "utility" tool that was slotted to fit?

In the scheme of things, not a big issue. I'm not incensed or anything. Just wondering what your take would be.


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Old 10-21-2020, 08:51 PM
Dave Richard Dave Richard is offline
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Unless, by chance, you find a vintage correct one, you can have one made by a competent luthier, familiar with archtops(especially Kalamazoos).
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Old 10-22-2020, 07:27 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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I looked at the bridge on the Cromwell in Jake's blog (which I follow regularly), and was struck by two things. It's as wide as it is because the screws that support the saddle are offset to create the compensation angle, and the saddle topper has no compensation built in (except for the ramp to compensate the B string that Jake always puts in everything). That is a unique and distinct configuration, and I would personally make a bridge to duplicate that if I owned the OP's vintage Cromwell. I normally have other ideas about the right way to do an archtop bridge, but in this case I would go the distance for as close to original as I could get.
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Old 10-22-2020, 02:54 PM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
I looked at the bridge on the Cromwell in Jake's blog (which I follow regularly), and was struck by two things. It's as wide as it is because the screws that support the saddle are offset to create the compensation angle, and the saddle topper has no compensation built in (except for the ramp to compensate the B string that Jake always puts in everything). That is a unique and distinct configuration, and I would personally make a bridge to duplicate that if I owned the OP's vintage Cromwell. I normally have other ideas about the right way to do an archtop bridge, but in this case I would go the distance for as close to original as I could get.
Good call on the offset. I didnít catch that at first and yes, if I were to do it over again I might try to get a bridge that replicated that design.
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Old 10-27-2020, 11:28 AM
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ArchtopLover ArchtopLover is online now
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Default A few KG-32 bridge photos to share

I have a 1930's era Kalamazoo KG-32 with the original bridge. I have attached a few close up photo's that may help if you ever decide to have a more accurate vintage replacement bridge fabricated. The original, vintage bridge foot, measures 5.4 inches long x 0.88 inches wide. It is very important that whichever bridge you use, the foot must be carefully profiled and mated to the soundboard top to prevent any buzzing and for maximum volume and tone. In other words, if you were to shine a light behind the bridge foot, you should not see any light passing through any gaps between the bridge foot and the soundboard top. Stew-Mac sells an archtop bridge profiling tool that works very well. This tool is very expensive if it's only needed for one job, but it is a simple design that can be copied with only moderate skills and very little in the way of tools or hardware.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:40 AM
upsidedown upsidedown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchtopLover View Post
I have a 1930's era Kalamazoo KG-32 with the original bridge. I have attached a few close up photo's that may help if you ever decide to have a more accurate vintage replacement bridge fabricated. The original, vintage bridge foot, measures 5.4 inches long x 0.88 inches wide. It is very important that whichever bridge you use, the foot must be carefully profiled and mated to the soundboard top to prevent any buzzing and for maximum volume and tone. In other words, if you were to shine a light behind the bridge foot, you should not see any light passing through any gaps between the bridge foot and the soundboard top. Stew-Mac sells an archtop bridge profiling tool that works very well. This tool is very expensive if it's only needed for one job, but it is a simple design that can be copied with only moderate skills and very little in the way of tools or hardware.
Thanks for the info, specs and advice. Much appreciated. As are the pics; nice looking top!

I hadn't considered getting a custom-built bridge, though I'm certainly open to the possibility. For now, my new one - while not quite as big as the original - is positioned snugly on the top. I'm not seeing any light under the foot.

What currently interests me most is whether or not I got the right replacement bridge - in terms of the spacing. Again, I asked for one with 2 1/4" string spacing and it appears that the one I received is for 2 1/8" (or 2 5/32"), but slotted to be 2 1/4". It looks a little funky, which I could get over. But I wonder if there's any physics(?) related reason for me to replace it.

Last edited by upsidedown; 10-28-2020 at 11:47 AM.
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