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  #16  
Old 08-27-2021, 06:49 PM
GroovyException GroovyException is offline
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You seem very focused on what you want. I think most of those 'traditional' beginner guitar courses are really geared towards people who just want to "learn to play the guitar" without having a specific style or genre in mind. I'm not suggesting they're not useful, but when you're new and everything is challenging, it's off-putting when the thing you're struggling to master is something you really have no desire to play.

Now there are a lot of online courses, song tutorials and other resources for blues and slide at all levels. Lots of good performers with lessons, but not all are good teachers. I really like Tom Feldman's teaching style, and he has a slide course and some other slide lessons on his website. I'd also suggest taking a look at Rev Robert Jones' stuff on Truefire. I can't imagine a better teacher for this style of music than him. He also offers private online lessons, but I think those are aimed at intermediate levels and upwards. Even if he doesn't teach beginners, he might be willing to take a lesson just to provide some advice to set you on the optimal path.

Finally, there's a lot to be said for face to face lessons with a good local teacher. Find one who can demonstrate their ability to play and teach the kind of music you want to learn and who shares your passion for it. I wasted months with teachers who had never heard of any of my favourite blues artists, and even one who had me playing 16th century lute pieces. My current teacher is a professional blues musician so all of our lessons work directly towards my objectives.

Hope this helps.
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  #17  
Old 08-27-2021, 06:51 PM
neilca neilca is offline
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I share the same journey as you Zoe only a little ahead. I chose to buy one of the cheap Glarry telecasters and set the action up high. I am starting with open G tuning and almost have the entrance of the slide onto the strings without sounding like a train wreck, almost. I have been watching videos and practicing. One day .....one day.....
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  #18  
Old 08-28-2021, 12:19 PM
zoe-national-0 zoe-national-0 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroovyException View Post
You seem very focused on what you want. I think most of those 'traditional' beginner guitar courses are really geared towards people who just want to "learn to play the guitar" without having a specific style or genre in mind. I'm not suggesting they're not useful, but when you're new and everything is challenging, it's off-putting when the thing you're struggling to master is something you really have no desire to play.
...

Hope this helps.
This was great, thanks for taking the time to respond to me. I'll check out some of those links. Right now I think I have a good handle on my path forward. I'm still using standard tuning but at this point in my learning curve that's not a hindrance. I do need to learn the fundamentals, become more accurate with my fingers on both hands. I'm picking the guitar up 3 or 4 times a day and doing about 15-20 mins each session. Starting with spider drills, some chord changes and for the fun part once warmed up, learning some 12 bar blue riffs. I see slow, incremental improvements and I'm good with that. This is a long term project and I'm having fun.
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  #19  
Old 08-28-2021, 12:21 PM
zoe-national-0 zoe-national-0 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neilca View Post
I share the same journey as you Zoe only a little ahead. I chose to buy one of the cheap Glarry telecasters and set the action up high. I am starting with open G tuning and almost have the entrance of the slide onto the strings without sounding like a train wreck, almost. I have been watching videos and practicing. One day .....one day.....
Open G is calling me, but probably not for a month of two. Good luck on your journey!

- Zo
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  #20  
Old 09-24-2021, 08:02 PM
DBW DBW is offline
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I recently bought a resonator (Gretsch brass body Honey Dipper). I take in person lessons but mainly electric blues stuff. For learning to play my resonator I have watched many YouTube videos. Rhett Shull has a few really good ones on how to get started. One key takeaway I learned was to keep the slide over the fret and not in between frets. Also use open tunings. I have mine in open E and it sounds really cool. I also finger strum it rather than using a pick. Rhett Shull recommended a Rock Slide. The one I got is called a Swamp Slide and it's made by a company called Songhurst. I really like it because it is beveled and has a notch so your guide finger stays with the slide rather than going all over the place. I put the slide on my third finger also. I have a smaller glass slide that I use on my pinky but that's harder for me to do. I also have a couple of ceramics but I like my brass one the best. Whatever you are more comfortable with re: the slide.
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  #21  
Old 09-24-2021, 10:51 PM
rockabilly69 rockabilly69 is offline
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Well my advice is a little different than others.

First off, too many people equate National guitars with slide guitar and open tunings. Although I play slide guitar on my National guitars, I play mostly in standard tuning, and many times I never pick up a slide piece. I just think certain songs are geared towards the sound of a National with it's beautiful midrange.

Here's a Jimi Hendrix song in Standard tuning on my National M2...


When I first learned to play slide guitar, I didn't even know about open tunings, I just played what I heard in my head. I would wait till a melody came to me. and then I would just figure out where the notes were on my guitar and play them. I started looking for pairs of strings in the chords that I was playing that lined up for my slide.

The big thing for me was learning how out to finger pick simple songs, so that I could play rudimentary bass lines with my thumb, while I played chords and simple melodies with my other fingers, and then eventually, with a slide. I just learned simple fingerpicking songs and started adding little flourishes of slide here and there.

I eventually learned how to play in open tunings, but I made up my own open tunings, and even when I play in open G, I do it different than most people, because I tune both of the top strings to G! low to high (GGDGBD)

Here's one my favorite tunings...
low to high) CGCGGC



I eventually got artist deal with National as Don Young (RIP) one of the co founders of the new National Resophonic heard what I was doing and liked it.

I think too many people paint themselves into a corner by buying a resonator and then just playing slide guitar blues on it. They are guitars first, they just happen to have resonator cones in them.

Start by learning to play songs first!

Last edited by rockabilly69; 09-24-2021 at 10:57 PM.
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  #22  
Old 09-28-2021, 09:25 AM
zoe-national-0 zoe-national-0 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockabilly69 View Post
Well my advice is a little different than others.

First off, too many people equate National guitars with slide guitar and open tunings. Although I play slide guitar on my National guitars, I play mostly in standard tuning, and many times I never pick up a slide piece. I just think certain songs are geared towards the sound of a National with it's beautiful midrange.
....
I think too many people paint themselves into a corner by buying a resonator and then just playing slide guitar blues on it. They are guitars first, they just happen to have resonator cones in them.

Start by learning to play songs first!
Nice stuff.

I actually agree with you. While my long term goal is blues slide guitar, that's the genre that just rocks me, I'm keeping my Style O in standard tuning and learning to play it. I'm using a course by Lauren Bateman. I found her on Youtube and really liked her style of teaching. I bought a 2008 Tricone which I'm noodling around on with for slide work in Open G, but my focus is learning standard guitar and tunes as my fundamentals.
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  #23  
Old 10-07-2021, 12:22 PM
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blews blews is offline
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Nice guitar! Congrats! There is so much great material in Open G and D....I very rarely play standard tuning on my National....Open G is harsher and bluesier for sure.....D is sweeter.......the nice thing is fingerings for the 1-4-5 are similar and just moving down a string....

If you are going to play slide, I recommend you force yourself to play with the slide on your pinky....Trust me.....you can thank me 6 months from now....There are some great players who play with the slide on their ring finger, but you have more fingering flexibility if you can play with it on your pinky....

Dive in and have a blast! There ain't nothing better than a National in Open G with a slide....
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  #24  
Old 10-07-2021, 12:28 PM
sedandelivery sedandelivery is offline
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Quote:
If you are going to play slide, I recommend you force yourself to play with the slide on your pinky....Trust me.....you can thank me 6 months from now....There are some great players who play with the slide on their ring finger, but you have more fingering flexibility if you can play with it on your pinky....
This is very good advice, and whatever you do, do NOT look up Dave Hole and copy his technique!
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  #25  
Old 10-07-2021, 02:50 PM
zoe-national-0 zoe-national-0 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blews View Post
If you are going to play slide, I recommend you force yourself to play with the slide on your pinky....Trust me.....you can thank me 6 months from now....There are some great players who play with the slide on their ring finger, but you have more fingering flexibility if you can play with it on your pinky....
I already have that habit. It just feels weird to me on the ring finger, but right on the pinky.

Thanks!

- Zo
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  #26  
Old 10-07-2021, 02:54 PM
zoe-national-0 zoe-national-0 is offline
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Originally Posted by sedandelivery View Post
This is very good advice, and whatever you do, do NOT look up Dave Hole and copy his technique!
I couldn't resist after being told not to Wow! That is not gonna happen, but more power to him!

- Zo
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  #27  
Old 10-11-2021, 09:49 PM
Mycroft Mycroft is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoe-national-0 View Post
Open G is calling me, but probably not for a month of two. Good luck on your journey!

- Zoé
Contrary to what people have been saying, you can play more than single note lines using a slide in standard. You can play chords, using inversions.

An inversion is simply a chord, (At a minimum a chord is the 1st or root in a scale, 3rd in the scale, and 5th in the scale, or 1-3-5, a triad) when the lowest sounding (basseist) individual note is NOT the root. Look at an A chord in standard tuning. Now look at the three notes lined up at the second fret on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings, which are a C#, A and E, 2nd to 4th strings. An A chord triad is A-C#-E, so this is an inverted Amajor chord, or more specifically, a 2nd degree A chord inversion (with the lowest note being the 5th of the chord. A 1st degree inversion has the 3rd as the lowest note.

But it is an actual A chord. At the nut, these three strings are a G chord. At the 5th fret, a C chord, and so on...

But wait, there is more...

If you play the 1st, 2nd and 3rd string at, say, the 5th fret, you get and A on the first string, a C (flatted 3rd) on the second string, and an E on the third string. An A-C-E triad is an Aminor, so here we have a 2nd degree inversion on an Am. Move down to the 7th fret, we have a B, etc.

And when you go to Open G, the Major chords stay at the same frets, as you only retune the 1st, 5th and 6th strings. So an Amajor in open G is all of the strings. (just remember that you don't have to play them all.)

One last thing. From your playing dobro you might remember Open G as being tuned GBDGBD, sixth string to first. That is really a squareneck tuning and may put to much stress on your old guitars neck because of tuning UP the 5th and 6th strings. You probably should use DGDGBD, as then you are tuning down.

Sweet looking guitar. I am envious. Play it in good health.

Last edited by Mycroft; 10-12-2021 at 11:28 AM.
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