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  #76  
Old 11-11-2023, 01:10 PM
kizz kizz is offline
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Originally Posted by grinningfool View Post
Each time I steamed the guitar was approximately a minute. Obviously the naysayers would claim this did nothing. But I assure you, steam is freaking HOT. I held my left hand on the guitar top near the neck, and held the steamer with my right hand. The wood got quite hot each time.
I firmly believe that if I had clamped the guitar cold and not steamed it, when it was strung up to full tension it would have reverted back where it was when I started.
I just rechecked the string height today after being strung to full tension for 11 days. It hasnít budged. Will it pull back up over time ? Maybe. Probably.
Iím not going to spend 6-7 hundred dollars for a pro neck reset on a guitar that is only worth 6-7 hundred dollars.
Iím not advocating this procedure for someone with a valuable vintage instrument. Iím only documenting my experience. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Iím happy with the result that I got.
Completely understandable. As I wrote earlier, I also tried an old Yairi with a result and I also only steamed very briefly which made the wood very hot, but I don't know if I did it enough. I would also never do it on an expensive guitar where a traditional neck reset was not difficult.
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  #77  
Old 11-11-2023, 01:30 PM
kizz kizz is offline
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Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
That is absolute rubbish, you have a few views happening, those who wish to do it on their own instruments which is a hey go for it from my point of view, but not lets advocate this as the be all end all way of doing it. Thats just dreaming on most peoples parts.

those who do this on a daily basis 40hrs a week and get paid to do it and must warrant their work, will have a differing view than hey lets see if this works and how long will it hold for, my point of contention is having spoken to john is he claims to be a luthier and this is what he does to customers guitars, if this is what he does to customers guitars, then he is no luthier

You tend to come in and say hey there is another proof it works and drop my name in your response so hence the replies.

As far as an agreed method for epoxied necks etc, far from it, epoxied neck resets can be done by slipping the back, or removing the fretboard and planing a new one etc, converting to a bolt on neck etc there are many ways to do it, clamping and cold bending is not one of them
I just have to say that at no time have I seen this method as anything other than an alternative fix on a cheap guitar where a troublesome neck reset could be avoided. It never occurred to me that a serious luthier would use this method. But when people, including me, have written that they have done the experiment successfully, why sit and contradict it and claim that it doesn't work? It makes no sense because regardless of how many years you have worked in a certain area, you have to respect that some things that don't make sense to one person might work for another. So take this for what it is, it's not about what other options there are, we're discussing this method and only that, try to relate to it.
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  #78  
Old 11-11-2023, 06:28 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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why sit and contradict it and claim that it doesn't work? It makes no sense because regardless of how many years you have worked in a certain area, you have to respect that some things that don't make sense to one person might work for another. So take this for what it is.
It is clear I cannot convince you, that fine.

Driving down the highway a check engine light comes up on my dash, I have a choice, one get the codes checked by a mechanic or someone who does mechanical work or option two I can put a sticker over the dashlight so I can no longer see the problem, both options require work and a choice, now people swear that the sticker over the check engine light works and they have done it, then sold their car straight after doing it or kept driving their car for the next year, but a mechanic will argue with that person regardless as it makes no sense to do that repair.

With that, enjoy.
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  #79  
Old 11-12-2023, 02:04 AM
kizz kizz is offline
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Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
It is clear I cannot convince you, that fine.
Actually no, you had a few good points, that's fine, but I'd rather deal with the results presented here in the thread.
I've tried the method, it was fun, it worked and I learned something, probably not something I have the patience to do again and then there's nothing more to it, have a good day!
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  #80  
Old 11-12-2023, 12:44 PM
Robin, Wales Robin, Wales is offline
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I look inside my D-18 and go "Where's the beef?".

So, as I understand it, a neck reset is "required" when the neck pulls up because the guitar's sides, top north of the sound hole, number 1 brace and fretboard extension can't stop the neck block rotating over time. The top collapses in and the neck effectively "pulls up".

A neck reset may also be "required" because the top bracing can't stop the top pulling up or bridge rotating.

A standard neck reset doesn't cure either of these issues it "compensates" for them.

This system described in this thread is a correction for the twisting neck block and collapsing top. It takes the neck block back to its original position. And perhaps it will then be a good while before the slow collapse happens again. It doesn't however solve the belly problem, if there is one. But you can steam and clamp a belly flatter too.

Overall however, wouldn't it just be better to alter the design a little so that neither of these issues (neck block rotation or excess bellying) happened in the first place?

I look inside my D-18 and go "Where's the beef?".

On my cheap A&L the neck block is never likely to rotate, because of its neck extension into a receiving socket in the body and laminated No 1 brace. Other manufacturers have also come up with design solutions.

Folks are in praise of guitars on which a neck reset is "straightforward". But I don't hear much about guitars that are designed so that you won't need to ever have one done?
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  #81  
Old 11-12-2023, 06:15 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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Robin, I think you're right about having enough structural integrity so as to avoid body deformation; Godin (Seagull) has practiced this for years, to their everlasting credit. But a whole lot of the guitar-consuming public worships at the altar of 'tone' and will not abide any other definition of excellemce.
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  #82  
Old 11-13-2023, 03:48 PM
Robin, Wales Robin, Wales is offline
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Originally Posted by phavriluk View Post
Robin, I think you're right about having enough structural integrity so as to avoid body deformation; Godin (Seagull) has practiced this for years, to their everlasting credit. But a whole lot of the guitar-consuming public worships at the altar of 'tone' and will not abide any other definition of excellemce.
Mmmm... There's a lot of "Emperor's new clothes" and "tradition" masquerading as "tone". All I can say is that, as 000s go, my A&L Legacy has a lot of character, and is very much alive. And folks like it when I play it.... even guitar folks!

I thought that I'd found somewhere secluded to play and sing a couple of days ago... The deck of an ocean going ferry crossing the Bay of Biscay chasing an autumn storm. I was just fingerpicking that A&L and singing a couple of songs to get ready for a concert spot later this week. I finished "Speed of the Sound of Loneliness" and got a round of applause from the promonading passengers. You can't ask more than that from a guitar - to be able to survive the journeyman's environment, and still sound and play good.

It's not rocket science to build good sounding guitars that aren't going to fold themselves in half at the first hint of a change in the seasons.

As far as serendipity goes. I guy came up to chat with me while I was playing on the boat deck. A guitarist as it turned out. We got chatting and as he listed the guitars he had I realised that I had sold him one of them 15 years ago. We had a good laugh about that!
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I'm learning to flatpick and fingerpick guitar to accompany songs.

I've played and studied traditional noter/drone mountain dulcimer for many years. And I used to play dobro in a bluegrass band.



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