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  #16  
Old 08-03-2018, 05:29 AM
mirwa mirwa is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodger Knox View Post
Actually, getting a really good finish is the hardest part of building.
That is my favourite part, I do finish work for some local builders.

Such a great feeling, making something made from wood, look and reflect like glass

Steve
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  #17  
Old 08-03-2018, 05:34 AM
mirwa mirwa is online now
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Originally Posted by ClaptonWannabe2 View Post
I'd love to start a project. I'd also love to refinish a guitar or two.
Robbie OíBrien to LMII is the same as Dan Erlewine to Stewmac.

Robbie does an awesome collection of step by step videos on how to do every stage of building a guitar, he sells his videos online vee his website.

If I was just starting out, I would purchase his videos and buy a starter kit from LMII.

Steve
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  #18  
Old 08-04-2018, 06:18 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Truckjohn View Post
He he he.... Yes... If only you spent $400 on your first guitar you would be doing a lot better than the rest of us... It could be 5x that if you have to buy all the tools and a work bench... And I assume you want tuners... This is probably the #1 best reason to do a class - access to the tools and the shop supplies.

Generally it's somewhere in between because you have some tools and some shop supplies... You will make do with what you have or can knock together on other operations, and you will buy some tools, parts, and jigs to supplement for stuff you can't live without....

$400-$600 on materials and a total budget of $1,200-$1500 counting tools and sundries is probably an honest estimate...

...
Not necessarily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
A maple tree fell down in my friends back yard - I got around 400 board feet of pretty good maple, some of which is now guitar necks, sides and backs
I am starting to feel a little resentful.

Quote:
My first top (I make archtops) was a 2X8 deck board of red cedar from Home Depot - perfectly quartersawn and straight/tight grain. It's perfectly possible to build a guitar from found wood with hand tools - resaw with a rip saw, chisels, knives, shop built circle cutters and gramils, and I build all my instruments on a Black and Decker Workmate. I have lots of other benches, but for some reason all my jigs fit on that little bench the best. You do have to buy things like frets, tuners, a few other bits and bobs, but I bet you could get away with under $100 in materials, and no more than 10 different hand tools if you wanted to really get down with it. figuring out a totally cheap side bend would be an interesting challenge...
Have I got a build thread for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by redir View Post
I built a parlor guitar for $35.50 once. The tuners were $10 bucks, the most expensive thing on the guitar.
See. It is not just me.


Now as far as the comments (some already know the story). I was on a classical luthier forum and a kid wanted to build his own guitar but he said he needed $800 in tools and then materials. I counted it us (more or less) and he was about right. Smart kid. Then I went on to build my 2x4 fence board guitar using the most basic of tools. Cheated a little using a couple of my power tools after I showed how could do it with hand tools (table saw and drum sander) but I needed surgery on my hand at the time and people gave me a little leeway. But otherwise I built a little guitar, not a great guitar mind you but one that is playable and actually enjoyable for about $40.

Cheap tuners and fret material bought online but otherwise wood from the big box home improvements store. I regret making the neck full classical width, a big jump practicing on it and then jumping to a Telecaster. I made another one, a little larger ($10 tuners and $5 rosewood bridge) but with the use of power tools and it took me two weeks to build plus one for finishing. It has sat by my side for a few years now, I took what I learned from them as far as a small guitar and have both a nylon and steel string soon to be finished that will replace them.

How hard is it to get into guitar building? Not very, but it is really hard to get out.
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  #19  
Old 08-17-2018, 07:54 PM
JLT JLT is offline
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You know, there's a forum especially for kit guitar builders:

http://www.kitguitarsforum.com/

It's moderated by John Hall of Blues Creek Guitars, but he welcomes all builders of all models. There's a ton of good stuff there.
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  #20  
Old 08-18-2018, 05:28 PM
PeteD PeteD is offline
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Here's an option...go drop $100 on a kit ukulele from Stew-Mac. I know its not a guitar, but its not a big investment and you will start to scratch the itch a little bit. You may love it and it may end up being 'meh' for you. You'll very likely end up with a cool little uke and you'll gain some great finishing experience.

If you love it, then you can spend $600 on a guitar kit from there or LMI...or find a 2nds or blemished kit on Ebay for probably $3-400.

Starting with a kit makes a lot of sense if you want to ensure some decent results. It also allows you to see if you can replicate various parts like bridges and fretboards. Then you can get some cheapo tops to practice joining and doing rosettes on.

I remember why I started building. I was too cheap to want to buy a really nice guitar out of great tonewoods. So I thought I'd build one instead for a lot less.

Ha!

After 6 or 7 guitars, I'm finally starting to get ok at it and I have spent a crap ton more than that one nice guitar I could have bought back in the day. Now, I had zero woodworking experience other than middle school wood shop boxes...so its taking me longer than others to produce something nice.

But it is really fun and people are in awe that I have built a few.

Its addicting for sure!
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  #21  
Old 08-20-2018, 09:14 AM
Truckjohn Truckjohn is offline
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Another option is to re-top and reset the neck on a cheap import beater..

Often as not - the necks, fretboards, and tuners are good enough. They just need a good leveling.

Replace the top with a good Spruce top. Install a bought bridge.

Then convert the neck to a bolt on. Properly set the neck and set the guitar up for a comfortable action....

And then finish it.

Now - you have gotten a taste of building a guitar without dropping a grand on kits, tools, and special jigs. You can decide if itís for you or if itís not.....
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