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  #16  
Old 01-13-2020, 09:32 AM
redir redir is offline
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I do bolt on conversions just like Stormin does but that's going to cost you quite a bit too. In fact it's easier to reset a Martin neck, especially an older HHG one, then it is to do a bolt on conversion. For me bolt on conversions are pretty much only done for sentimental guitars with unknown neck joints and or AMG joints.
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  #17  
Old 01-13-2020, 11:10 AM
hat hat is offline
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Another low to no cost option is to loosen and separate the back from the neck and sides just on the upper end, ( about 5 inches either side of the neck) then just re-glue that joint, but pull the heel of the neck towards the tail end of the guitar just a small bit ( 1/8" is probably more than enough) . The idea is to angle the neck back just a few degrees, just enough to get the playing height back to where it should be. Make sure the neck is straight in line with the bridge when you do this, and glue it back together. This method doesn't require removing the bridge, or the neck. This was the normal way to adjust a neck set prior to Luthier's figuring out that the neck joint could be steamed loose and re-set.
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Last edited by hat; 01-14-2020 at 06:52 AM. Reason: correction
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  #18  
Old 01-13-2020, 02:07 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packocrayons View Post
My understanding is the notches are actually there to do the cutting, and you're supposed to jam-nut the insert onto a screw to get it in
It also help to use epoxy for this step in case the hole gets stripped.
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  #19  
Old 01-13-2020, 03:28 PM
redir redir is offline
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I think the notches are ther to do the cutting but it does'nt really matter, as long as it goes in. I always made them a bit more loose and epoxied them in. Now I use the steel ones that you can drive in with an Allen key. Much easier imho.
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  #20  
Old 01-13-2020, 05:59 PM
stormin1155 stormin1155 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packocrayons View Post
My understanding is the notches are actually there to do the cutting, and you're supposed to jam-nut the insert onto a screw to get it in
They are tapered on the other end, so that didn't seem like what they were for, but you may be right.
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  #21  
Old 01-13-2020, 07:49 PM
jricc jricc is offline
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You guys are all awesome! Thank you! While I wouldnt attempt this myself, I can try to find a qualified person who can...thank you all again!
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  #22  
Old 01-13-2020, 08:10 PM
JLT JLT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packocrayons View Post
My understanding is the notches are actually there to do the cutting, and you're supposed to jam-nut the insert onto a screw to get it in
I don't think so ...

Woodcraft sells a tool for not much money:

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/t...1-4-20-inserts

I've also installed them with a simple eye-bolt with two nuts threaded on to it. The nuts are tightened against each other, and the insert is threaded on next. The whole schmutz goes into the hole in the neck, and then I loosen one of the threaded-on nuts, allowing the other nut to loosen. But the Woodcraft tool is easier to use.

In all other respects, your write-up is right on. And there are two advantages to the bolt-on approach:

1. It eliminates the need to steam the dovetail joint open, which is a major PITA, and even more so with the "mystery" glues that were used in Japan around that time.

2. In twenty years, when the neck again needs a reset (and it probably will), the tech's job is that much easier.
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