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Old 11-24-2019, 01:11 AM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Default my old Classical guitar with neck drifting into sound box PHOTOS ADDED!

Hi! SEE MY LATEST NEWS AT POST #18 ON PAGE 2 AS I WENT TO THE REPAIR SHOP TODAY. IF YOU CAN READ HERE TOO FOR ANY NEWCOMER TO MY THREAD. I FINALLY LEARNED AND ADDED PHOTOS.
I WISH IT WAS MORE DIRECT, BUT FINALLY DID IT! THANKS TO ALL!


I went to a guitar shop about 2 yrs ago and after they assessed things the repair person noted what needed to be done, yet she said the neck was migrating into the box and to correct that would involve remounting the neck and not be feasible for my old guitar at a cost of $200. I bought it used from Salvation Army Store in 1980 with the case for $10. It sounds beautiful. Others have agreed, and some joke with me that it looks like Willie Nelson's famous old guitar. I didn't wear holes in the front though.

A luthier looked at it after I played once at a jam and pointed out how the spruce top wood has grain that's very close together and makes for a better top than the newer woods that come from trees that grew very fast, wide grain. The grains on mine, quite a few, are paper thin. He said that was from a tree that was very old and grew in competition with other trees.

Anyways, I put up with the out of tune sound up around the 10th fret and above, only now I want to go back to that shop, find a different guy there, and try to convince him to give me a quote on instead of re-mounting the whole neck, to see what it would cost to remount the bridge. Wouldn't moving that cost a lot less? It's not a riveted bridge, it's just glued to the surface of the top.

What I didn't tell the other first luthier in that same shop was around 3 years ago a guy at a music store shop who once worked at Gibson acoustic mfg in I think it was Boise Idaho for quite a few years said to put a thin piece of spruce and glue it so it butted up against the neck to keep it from migrating. As fast as he said it, he grabbed a thin piece of scrap spruce, held it under the sound hole, took his ball point pen, traced about 2 inches of the curve of the sound hole, then in a flash cut it in the shop band saw. He then glued it with it butted up against the neck. It was amazing how fast he did it, a sizable piece and a great idea. It hasn't migrated any farther from what I can see, meaning the cracks don't look re-cracked etc. The strings aren't too far off the neck.

Is moving the bridge a lot easier than re-mounting the neck, plus involve a lot less shop time and cost far less? I don't have much money (the story of my life ha) and hope I can save it. To me it sounds like a $1,000 guitar. It has a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, but no brand name.

A very pro Jazz guitarist who performs paid gigs, and sells and teaches guitar, said my guitar reminded him of in the 1960's going to Mexico, some town I don't remember the name of, where many would buy cheap guitars locally made there. I think he's right. The bridge seems made of mahogany too.

It seems at the open mics that people are seriously liking my music and even got a standing ovation that I never in several years going as a listener saw happen. I always played by myself before and never thought I was all that great, but now I'm starting to wonder if I should try playing more in public and see what happens. Another guy wanted to hear me play his Martin D45 and play at their family's Thanksgiving dinner! Another guy who hosted a songwriters open mic liked my playing so much he gave me his CD and said he wanted me to play when a lot of people were there (in a bar/restaurant). I'd asked to play last at near 1AM when most were gone. So it all seems worth it in a different way now days to maybe get my guitar to sound in tune up the neck. I think, since I use a lot of the upper part of the neck too, as high as only a fret or two below the sound hole sometimes, but mainly 12th fret and below, and "finger style" picking patterns, and sustain and harmony precision is more critical in my case, that I'm hoping to hang onto this guitar and save money.

Several years ago two music stores turned my guitar back with their sub-hired luthiers telling them it's not worth fixing. I ended up fixing the loose back myself with the coaching of that guy who worked for Gibson. I think he left on uneasy terms as the owner of that music store, when I asked about him, was very obstinate when I mentioned his name. He had wanted a "community bench" where one could repair their own guitars and I think the owner didn't. Anyways, any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Oh, about how much would it cost to re-position a bridge? Is that a feasible or okay idea in my case? Also, is it a lot to maybe have them use an even better wood than mahogany for the bridge? Maybe for a little more they could use an even harder wood. Is that a good idea? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Winfred
1. https://i.imgur.com/yzqFDcT.jpg
2. https://i.imgur.com/XXDtrCV.jpg
3. https://i.imgur.com/uqdK9Js.jpg
4. https://i.imgur.com/2hqS92E.jpg
5. https://i.imgur.com/MocBob8.jpg
6. https://i.imgur.com/7lBLsdf.jpg
7. https://i.imgur.com/AAyGvZ8.jpg
8. https://i.imgur.com/PuhXU10.jpg

Last edited by Winfred; 01-19-2020 at 10:26 PM. Reason: NOTICE OF MY REPAIR SHOP VISIT AT POST #18 ON PAGE 2
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  #2  
Old 11-24-2019, 02:43 AM
Bax Burgess Bax Burgess is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winfred View Post

I went to a guitar shop...and after they assessed things the repair person noted what needed to be done, yet she said the neck was migrating into the box and to correct that would involve remounting the neck...at a cost of $200.

I put up with the out of tune sound up around the 10th fret and above, only now I want to go back to that shop, find a different guy there...to see what it would cost to remount the bridge...It's not a riveted bridge, it's just glued to the surface of the top.

...around 3 years ago a guy at a music store shop...said to put a thin piece of spruce and glue it so it butted up against the neck to keep it from migrating. ...he grabbed a thin piece of scrap spruce, held it under the sound hole, took his ball point pen, traced about 2 inches of the curve of the sound hole, then ...cut it in the shop band saw. He then glued it with it butted up against the neck...It hasn't migrated any farther from what I can see, meaning the cracks don't look re-cracked etc. The strings aren't too far off the neck.

Is moving the bridge a lot easier than re-mounting the neck, plus involve a lot less shop time and cost far less?...To me it sounds like a $1,000 guitar. It has a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, but no brand name.
Changing the location of the bridge will change the intonation on all of the frets. The strings aren't too high? They are progressively rising from the 10th fret to the soundhole, and the fingerboard has been dipping into the body (my understanding), which means that 'Trigger' needs a neck reset and possibly a little more, if the issue is to be adequately resolved. Your dime, your choice.
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Old 11-24-2019, 03:54 AM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bax Burgess View Post
Changing the location of the bridge will change the intonation on all of the frets. The strings aren't too high? They are progressively rising from the 10th fret to the soundhole, and the fingerboard has been dipping into the body (my understanding), which means that 'Trigger' needs a neck reset and possibly a little more, if the issue is to be adequately resolved. Your dime, your choice.
Hi Bax!

Thanks very much for taking the time to read and respond!

What happened was the neck or fingerboard didn't bend inwards in relation to the fingerboard being parallel to the face of the body. The neck migrated forward meaning toward the bridge and the spruce top. The fingerboard comes right up to the sound hole. It shifted toward or advanced into the sound hole about 1/32 of an inch. That offset is not there anymore. I think the last luthier, to be nice, did something, yet maybe all he did was sand it even. My fingerboard comes right up to the sound hole and is cut to match the edge of the sound hole.

Really in effect I think, because that the other luthier glued the piece of wood that he butted up against the neck brace inside the body, that he actually stopped the migration. That's a lot of glued surface to surface area that would take a tremendous amount of shear force to cause more cracking and the neck advancing. Also I changed to normal tension rather than high tension strings. So under those conditions, wouldn't it be cheapest to relocate the bridge so that the notes are to pitch once I get above the 10th fret? Isn't that a lot easier and less expensive than remounting the neck? My bridge is not riveted, just glued to the surface of the face.

About how much does it cost to move a bridge, or maybe even put in a harder wood than mahogany? They wouldn't have to refinish my top as I don't care about looks, just the quality of sound... so it would be less labor intensive that way too. I know ebony is very expensive, but is there another wood even harder than mahogany? Would a different bridge transmit the sound even better into the top?

Thanks!
Winfred
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Old 11-24-2019, 10:22 AM
Bax Burgess Bax Burgess is offline
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I get it now. Moving the bridge to match the degree of neck movement, I wonder if there's a risk of tonal change, and would the changing of the bridge wood add to that? You're a good player, so your talent will doubtless express itself well with another guitar. I just think that your guitar has to be rebuilt to return to its former self.
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Old 11-24-2019, 12:49 PM
Drak Drak is offline
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What I see happening here is cognitive dissonance.
You're confusing yourself and muddying the waters when the answer is actually pretty clear.

Let me explain:
The guitar obviously means a great deal to you.
That's all that matters really, that is the operating directive here.

However, you're allowing it to be devalued right in front of you.
By yourself, by the current market, by stories, by luthiers, by market value.
All of which mean absolutely nothing except the value you place on those things above the guitar.

You're creating confusion where there doesn't need to be any.
This guitar is your Experience, and you're cheapening it and devaluing it.
Stop doing that and realize the worth and value this guitar has for you and problem solved.

One one hand, you love this guitar, that is obvious.
OTOH, you're believing it's a piece of crap.
That is dissonance, that creates internal confusion.
So, which one is it?
It's either the one or the other.
Make the call, it's a cheap POS or its very valuable.
In which case you will have it repaired properly as if it was worth a Lot.

Willie keeps Trigger maintained to a very high degree, tho it may not look like it.
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Old 11-26-2019, 11:43 AM
Sardara Sardara is offline
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Moving the bridge might be a case of two wrongs trying to make a right. Perhaps if you could post a picture someone might recognise the make or model of your guitar which could help you look for a direct replacement on Ebay etc. This would let you still use your old guitar for anything below 10th fret
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Old 11-26-2019, 12:19 PM
Edgar Poe Edgar Poe is offline
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NOT WORTH IT...

I really have a hard time with others opinion of a item that they have no stake in.

Regardless of what it cost you, are you willing to just hang it up. Has the experience with that guitar not been worth $200.00 ?

I have a Shetland Sheepdog that is about 12 years old. Last year she developed Pyometrea, she had to have a total hysterectomy, it cost $2,000.00. She has recently developed bleeding again. The Vet said this may happen. So I have two choices, Get her fixed, and pay for it, or have her put down. IS SHE WORTH IT ?
Worth is a personal evaluation, not based on what an item costs or it's monetary value. It is worth what ever a person feels it's value is.

In 1957 my Dad bought a transistor radio for my Mom. It was Crown, and cost maybe $50.00. it used a 22.5 volt battery.
Well my Dad passed away in 1989. When my Mom was cleaning out his stuff, she ran across the radio, and because she could not find a battery to make it work, she threw out.

That radio right now, is a very collectible model, and is worth north of $3,000.00.

I wish I had that radio.

NEVER ASK SOMEONE ELSE, IF SOMETHING YOU HAVE IS WORTH IT. Only you know that.



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Old 11-29-2019, 04:51 PM
casualmusic casualmusic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winfred View Post
Hi Bax!


What happened was the neck or fingerboard didn't bend inwards in relation to the fingerboard being parallel to the face of the body. The neck migrated forward meaning toward the bridge and the spruce top. The fingerboard comes right up to the sound hole. It shifted toward or advanced into the sound hole about 1/32 of an inch. That offset is not there anymore. I think the last luthier, to be nice, did something, yet maybe all he did was sand it even. My fingerboard comes right up to the sound hole and is cut to match the edge of the sound hole.
their website at.

Really in effect I think, because that the other luthier glued the piece of wood that he butted up against the neck brace inside the body, that he actually stopped the migration. That's a lot of glued surface to surface area that would take a tremendous amount of shear force to cause more cracking and the neck advancing. Also I changed to normal tension rather than high tension strings.

So under those conditions, wouldn't it be cheapest to relocate the bridge so that the notes are to pitch once I get above the 10th fret? Isn't that a lot easier and less expensive than remounting the neck? My bridge is not riveted, just glued to the surface of the face.

About how much does it cost to move a bridge, or maybe even put in a harder wood than mahogany?

They wouldn't have to refinish my top as I don't care about looks, just the quality of sound... so it would be less labor intensive that way too. I know ebony is very expensive, but is there another wood even harder than mahogany? Would a different bridge transmit the sound even better into the top?

Thanks!
Winfred

Hi Winfred

guitar tech will charge $50-100 to clean out the old glue, and reglue the bridge.

Search the Internet for "reglue guitar bridge" for typical prices and descriptions of work.

When done, the distance from nut to 12th fret and the distance from 12th fret to saddle should be approx the same.

Guitar guy will calculate the exact distance needed to get the best intonation. For best results you'll want a tech or builder who knows how to calculate this. (And clean off all the old glue and finish under the bridge).

You're saying that the neck shifted towards the soundhole but the tilt is still OK?

Since you really like this guitar and want to get the high notes back in range it's probably worthwhile to get the bridge moved back (even though some folks may not agree).


Cheers

.
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Old 11-29-2019, 10:55 PM
dosland dosland is offline
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I'm not sure I fully understand how the neck can have moved toward the soundhole/bridge without some buckling or other neck issues, assuming it's a Spanish heel. You mention cracks somewhere, it would be useful to see those. In my view, if you're really committed to getting the guitar back up to it's original glory, a full neck reset makes more sense than moving the bridge - moving the bridge and making a new one will probably cost about the same as a neck reset, and the neck reset will allow you to tweak everything else just like it's supposed to be done. You may also be better served by a fingerboard reset/replacement, depending on what the actual issue is. A good luthier who can be convinced you think the guitar is worth the investment will also offer the best advice on how to proceed. But it may also be very difficult to convince a good luthier that the instrument is sufficiently sound, structurally, to warrant all the work/investment required.
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Old 12-03-2019, 03:16 PM
redir redir is offline
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Ah yes Paracho Mexico. I have been there and there are lots of cheap guitars and some of them are even pretty darn nice. As far as I could tell though they were all made outside in what ever weather conditions they have there so if you bring one back to your home country it might have issues.

Anyway, hate to say it but that's life. The life of a guitar anyway. They eventually fold up on themselves. Though classical guitars tend to do it a lot slower.

It sounds to me like htat one has reached the end of it's life cycle but of course if you truly love the thing then some amount of money can probably fix it. You just have to make some decisions.
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Old 12-14-2019, 10:46 PM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Default Just maybe possible still after what I add to this?

Hi Casualmusic, and All!

There are a lot of members very devoted to respond to here. It's Saturday evening and Monday it's my plan to take it to a luthier shop for an appraisal on repair. It's the only day of the week another luthier isn't there, a long story, so I can talk to the one other luthier about my guitar without hurting the feelings of the other luthier. It's a good shop as they even repaired for a very famous musician I won't name because then they might feel bad I'm second guessing them. I went to them about 2 yrs ago and they cleaned my fretboard of old layers of varnish and flipped the insert in the bridge around as it was in bevel backwards and causing the A string to repeatedly break on its own. It was then one of the luthiers said $200 to reset the neck. At a small cheap shop I did other repairs with their "community bench" with the coaching of a pro luthier.

I'm very low budget where for me $100 is like $1,000. My guitar sounds beautiful, but looks terrible. I think it sounds like a $1,000 guitar. I can't even afford a $400 guitar. So I'm hoping like you quoted, maybe $100 I can have the bridge reset. What is the change in tone they're talking about? Just moving the bridge I thought would correct the out of tune sound in the upper frets but not the tone. Maybe the strings are a little high off the frets in the upper frets, but it's okay with me, and not so much I don't think it's causing the out of tune sound. Maybe it is and the luthier will tell me so.

I don't know how to post photos here. I have an old camera someone gave me that only works for 60 seconds when it's first turned on and not sure how to post photos here. I think the bridge is made of mahogany, like the back and sides. I wonder how much it would be for a harder wood bridge that might make it sound like a $2,000 guitar. I can't afford an ebony bridge, but maybe some other cheaper wood yet better than mahogany. I just figure maybe for $100 I can still save money and keep this guitar... yet most say it's not worth it.

I can live with it as it is, only I play all over the neck. I use subtle harmonic overlays at times where all can hear it magnified when they mic me up at an open mic. The out of tune sound bothers me. I play at times what they call "finger style". I'll play and sing a verse, then do an instrumental interlude. My tuner, made in Denmark, cost $50, five times as much as I originally paid for my guitar ha! Sounding in tune in my case means a lot to me.

It came with an old ship board case, very old. I had to finally, after duct taping it etc, owning it for 34 years (case probably from the 50's) have to throw it out. I bought a styrofoam structured case, a nice and very light one with shoulder straps so I can carry it while riding my bike. 8 days ago I went to a paid gig this musican was playing at. He said over the mic that I should play a couple of songs. I thought he was kidding until I noticed he was angry with me and didn't talk to me after during his break. I had said it in a nice way too. I realized he was serious. I also had a year ago a standing ovation I've never seen happen going just to listen to that open mic. At another one a guy was in tears over my original song, and two others giving me a hug, I mean seriously moved. Another open mic a guy said he noticed how the audience was riveted etc. when I played. I'm bragging, but just thinking I am taking myself more seriously now. People asked me too who my influences have been, or when I started playing etc. I started thinking I might, with a place that has a sound system, maybe see if I could play part of an evening. I can play for about 1 1/2 hrs, yet can't take requests. I'm saying all of this and wonder if you might, or anyone here, might have other thoughts about my guitar and the direction I'm going now I've mentioned more. Thanks too all! I'll let you all know what the pro says on Monday 12-16-19.
Carpe Diem!
Winfred

Quote:
Originally Posted by casualmusic View Post
Hi Winfred

guitar tech will charge $50-100 to clean out the old glue, and reglue the bridge.

Search the Internet for "reglue guitar bridge" for typical prices and descriptions of work.

When done, the distance from nut to 12th fret and the distance from 12th fret to saddle should be approx the same.

Guitar guy will calculate the exact distance needed to get the best intonation. For best results you'll want a tech or builder who knows how to calculate this. (And clean off all the old glue and finish under the bridge).

You're saying that the neck shifted towards the soundhole but the tilt is still OK?

Since you really like this guitar and want to get the high notes back in range it's probably worthwhile to get the bridge moved back (even though some folks may not agree).


Cheers

.
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Old 12-14-2019, 11:01 PM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Hi!
If I ever see that guy again, and he's a pro jazz guitarist I hope to attend one of his performances, I'll mention what you said. I think I'll try to go there on my journey I'm planning via hitchhiking and second class buses... my budget ha! This luthier looked at my guitar and said I was lucky the spruce top, the wood, the grain is not much more than paper thin! He said it was from a very slow growing tree and the best wood just by chance! It has mahogany back and sides, and a mahogany bridge. I might ask the guitar tech on Monday 12-16-19 of any type of other hardwood that's maybe harder than the mahogany. I can't afford an ebony bridge. He'll probably tell me what most say here, it's not worth it, but I'm keeping my fingers crossed as it "sounds" much better than it looks -- like a very expensive guitar.

I bought it used in 1981 for $10, and with the case. Even the owner of a store who at one time sold to Bob Dylan, even played on it and said, "You know, this is a good guitar." and he said "good" with emphasis. The reason he played on it was because his tech called him from a back room to listen to my guitar. I was at a pub that has a circle jam and a pro guitarist, he plays all kinds of music yet his specialty is flamenco, asked to play on it. He said the same thing that other guy said 33 years ago. Still though, about 3 yrs ago two luthiers with 2 other shops said they wouldn't work on it, only this more pro shop did, pro meaning they repaired a guitar for a world renowned guitarist, but I can't mention his name as then they'd know I'm kind of second guessing them etc. and don't want them to feel bad. Thanks for all!
Carpe Diem!
Winfred

Quote:
Originally Posted by redir View Post
Ah yes Paracho Mexico. I have been there and there are lots of cheap guitars and some of them are even pretty darn nice. As far as I could tell though they were all made outside in what ever weather conditions they have there so if you bring one back to your home country it might have issues.

Anyway, hate to say it but that's life. The life of a guitar anyway. They eventually fold up on themselves. Though classical guitars tend to do it a lot slower.

It sounds to me like htat one has reached the end of it's life cycle but of course if you truly love the thing then some amount of money can probably fix it. You just have to make some decisions.
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Old 12-14-2019, 11:30 PM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Hi Dosland!

You make a very good point about the buckling, and I realize the strings are a little bit higher but not much, tolerable. I have interludes when I sing, to where I play just instrumental variations with subtle harmonic overlays and chiming at times where an "in-tune" sound is important to me, especially at open mics where I try out my original songs and my guitar is amplified 10 times as loud and they hear every little thing.

I don't know what a "Spanish heel" is but the bridge is the same color as the back and sides which is mahogany. Do you mean by "heel" the bridge? Oh, it also needs a new nut as the old one my wound fatter strings "slip" as I try to re-tune. It makes a slip sound and suddenly the string lowers quite a ways and makes it a hassle to re-tune. Maybe that's expensive too. The highest I decided to go, the very highest, is $150.

I was surprised as a guy even came up to me after I played and said, "if you ever record I'll do bass backup." I couldn't believe it and said I couldn't afford to do that and he said, "I'll back you up for free. That's what I do for others." and he plays a huge upright bass and both plucks and bows. Not many bow too. I think he said he'd played symphony too. Wow to have him with my harmonic overlays! Another musician had me for Thanksgiving and big family and brought out his guitar, but I was too nervous and too loud with so many people in high pitched conversations at once. So I am taking myself more seriously, but really careful as I don't want to get false delusions or think along some pipe-dream lines.

I might ask the tech on Monday where I plan to go for an appraisal etc if there's a better wood for my bridge too. I can't afford ebony, so something in between -- if you can think of any good wood that's cheaper yet better than mahogany. He could say like most here, it's not worth it. $100 is like $1,000 to me and hoping for $100 I can keep it as it sounds like a much more expensive guitar. See the other replies and you'll know what I mean. It's risky as I don't own a car and can't afford to take a taxi to open mics where I've been trying out my original songs. I have to go through very cold weather, yet I take a hand warmer, the kind that is a small bag of I think iron filings, disposable one-time use warmers.... I wrap it in a moist wash cloth and put that in my case.

I'm realizing things about myself more with my playing. Last week a guy was in tears and two others I didn't know giving me hugs etc and another coffeehouse I got a standing ovation I've never seen happen there and other happenings so that I'm now taking myself more seriously. I live on a very low income so trying to make this guitar survive yet most here say otherwise, which I appreciate. Maybe if you can see what I just said in the other replies too as maybe you have some additional advice. Thanks so much for responding! I'm going to come back to comment after I visit the pro luthier or repair shop. They repaired for a world renowned guitarist, yet I don't name him as all here would know him and I don't want that shop to think I'm second guessing them or whatever should they browse at this nice forum. Thanks so much for all!

Kindest Regards,
Winfred


Quote:
Originally Posted by dosland View Post
I'm not sure I fully understand how the neck can have moved toward the soundhole/bridge without some buckling or other neck issues, assuming it's a Spanish heel. You mention cracks somewhere, it would be useful to see those. In my view, if you're really committed to getting the guitar back up to it's original glory, a full neck reset makes more sense than moving the bridge - moving the bridge and making a new one will probably cost about the same as a neck reset, and the neck reset will allow you to tweak everything else just like it's supposed to be done. You may also be better served by a fingerboard reset/replacement, depending on what the actual issue is. A good luthier who can be convinced you think the guitar is worth the investment will also offer the best advice on how to proceed. But it may also be very difficult to convince a good luthier that the instrument is sufficiently sound, structurally, to warrant all the work/investment required.
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Old 12-14-2019, 11:36 PM
Winfred Winfred is offline
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Hi Ed!

Wow! What an analogy with sharing about your dog! That's very kind of you to take the time, and to share such a story, a good analogy as it might not be pleasant to tell another that their guitar isn't worth it. It's okay with me. I've even been told that twice via 2 other music stores that hire out their repairs. They both said once their repair person came and looked, and 2 separate stores, the luthier said it wasn't even worth fixing! That was about 3 yrs ago. I'm taking my music more seriously as you might see some of the happenings I mention after I play at some of the open mics. I'm caring more about my playing now days and also want to finally get rid of that out of tune sound. If you might read the other responses maybe you might think of something, yet so nice of you to respond. It's late now and wanted to reply to others too as I'm very appreciative only my head is nodding ha! I'm going to a very pro repair shop on Monday, and I'll report back here what happens. Thanks for all!!!

Carpe Diem!
Winfred

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgar Poe View Post
NOT WORTH IT...

I really have a hard time with others opinion of a item that they have no stake in.

Regardless of what it cost you, are you willing to just hang it up. Has the experience with that guitar not been worth $200.00 ?

I have a Shetland Sheepdog that is about 12 years old. Last year she developed Pyometrea, she had to have a total hysterectomy, it cost $2,000.00. She has recently developed bleeding again. The Vet said this may happen. So I have two choices, Get her fixed, and pay for it, or have her put down. IS SHE WORTH IT ?
Worth is a personal evaluation, not based on what an item costs or it's monetary value. It is worth what ever a person feels it's value is.

In 1957 my Dad bought a transistor radio for my Mom. It was Crown, and cost maybe $50.00. it used a 22.5 volt battery.
Well my Dad passed away in 1989. When my Mom was cleaning out his stuff, she ran across the radio, and because she could not find a battery to make it work, she threw out.

That radio right now, is a very collectible model, and is worth north of $3,000.00.

I wish I had that radio.

NEVER ASK SOMEONE ELSE, IF SOMETHING YOU HAVE IS WORTH IT. Only you know that.



Ed
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  #15  
Old 12-15-2019, 12:19 PM
Skip Ellis Skip Ellis is offline
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It's impossible to answer you or give an opinion without pictures as some of the terms you use don't make sense. Maybe you could find someone with a camera? Also, classical guitar bridges are almost always rosewood and rarely ebony - I've never in 60 years of repairing and building seen a mahogany bridge and an ebony bridge shouldn't cost much more than rosewood. anyway. Guitars tend to fold themselves in the middle with the neck staying straight - sounds like what may be happening here, especially with the instrument not be in a climate controlled environment. And another point: I would disregard any 'appraisal' that is free - they're worth what you pay for them. Go to someone who is an expert and pay them a fee to give you a written appraisal of the instrument, then decide if it's worth repairing. Gruhn Guitars in Nashville will do an appraisal based on photos - you can find them online. You haven't mentioned the brand of guitar - that's very important - does it have a label? As you describe it, I'm guessing the fingerboard is rosewood which denotes a lower priced instrument - most pro level guitars will have ebony fingerboards - again, mahogany fingerboards are not the norm - I don't think I've ever seen or even heard of one. If it's a Spanish 'slipper foot' neck connection, it is very very difficult to repair as the sides are actually tenoned into the neck. Some of the lower priced classical guitars of the 60s and 70s (and maybe even later) like Yamaha were made with dovetail neck joints which were easier to manufacture and some were even 'butt-jointed' to the body with only a couple wooden dowels and some glue.

Another point: I would never take a classical guitar to a big box music store for any reason. These people are not 'luthiers' - they are repair techs who don't know much more than restringing electric guitars for rock players and doing the occasional neck adjustment - they, as a rule, know nothing about classical guitars.

Personally, I don't connect much emotion to instruments - they're just tools and if they can no longer do the job, they have to make way for something that can.

Good Luck!!
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  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Classical

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bridge, feasibility, guitar repair, prices, wood type

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