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  #1  
Old 01-10-2020, 04:40 PM
larryb larryb is offline
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Default Tone and technique

I am curious to how much people on here feel that technique affects tone on a good nylon string guitar. Open to hearing discussions of all sorts about this topic.
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Old 01-10-2020, 06:28 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Itís a given. A lot of oneís tone depends on oneís technique.
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Old 01-11-2020, 08:41 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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Classical guitarists (which are not the exclusive players of nylon string guitars) spend years learning and perfecting technique to sound "right" on their instrument. It's astounding to me to hear a great player with dynamics, volume, clarity that far exceed what I can produce from the same instrument. I always thought of nylon strung guitars as "quiet" until I heard a professional classical guitarist completely fill a room with their sound.
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Old Yesterday, 01:35 PM
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I was thinking about this today.

I have steel string guitars of various types and cost. They start at about $340 and end up at around $3,000. You can literally hear the difference with just a simple strum.

Not so with classical guitars I have found. I strummed a few over $1,000 last year and they did sound very nice, but when I played the trebles using my steel string finger style fingers, I got "plunk plunk." The same thing happened this year when I played several between $340 and $900.

"Plunk plunk."

Now at home, on my Cordoba I get an awful lot of "plunk plunk" but every so often I hear something besides a "plunk" as I struggle through some beginner stuff. Nylon is all technique.
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Old Yesterday, 01:42 PM
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Yep, it took me almost a year of work to fix my right hand technique. What worked great on steel string guitars, sounded like junk on nylons.

Plink plunk is about right.
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Old Yesterday, 05:48 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBman View Post
Nylon is all technique.
So is steel string once you know what to listen for.
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Old Today, 12:45 AM
Carey Carey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryb View Post
I am curious to how much people on here feel that technique affects tone on a good nylon string guitar. Open to hearing discussions of all sorts about this topic.
You could check out William Kanengiser's two instructional DVDs; and/or Charles Duncan's book 'The Art of Classical Guitar Playing'. Neither are recent,
but both are very good.

Nail shape and macro-smoothness can make a big difference, and "pushing"
the string inward, toward the soundboard, is essential to getting a good sound,
IMO. For me the acid test is playing on the open high 'e' string: if you can get
the sound you're looking for there, you can get it anywhere. I like to start
with the a-i-m-i RH pattern.
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