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  #31  
Old 12-26-2020, 10:58 AM
Vaillant75 Vaillant75 is offline
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Great choice going for the spruce headstock, I think it will look killer. Are you going for a black backplate? Would tie up nicely with the colorations of your back.

Thanks for the detailed posts, I have been following closely.
Cheers,
Tom
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  #32  
Old 12-26-2020, 11:32 AM
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What Thomas said. That headstock is killer.
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  #33  
Old 12-26-2020, 04:06 PM
virob virob is offline
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Originally Posted by Vaillant75 View Post
Great choice going for the spruce headstock, I think it will look killer. Are you going for a black backplate? Would tie up nicely with the colorations of your back.

Yes, there will be a black backplate.

The neck closest to the camera, is the one for this build.
Thanks for following.

IMG_1609020359.481078.jpg
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  #34  
Old 12-28-2020, 11:43 AM
virob virob is offline
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Truss rod now has an access cover that is held in place with magnets.

IMG_1609175878.364194.jpg

IMG_1609175811.108023.jpg

Check out the matching bevels in the binding, rosette and head plate.
Really like how this ties everything together. Simple, elegant and a little different.

IMG_1609176045.298291.jpgIMG_1609176062.408507.jpgIMG_1609176202.936592.jpgIMG_1609176530.205924.jpg

The fitting between the neck and the body showing the elevated neck.

IMG_1609176156.713251.jpg


The end graft complimenting the access cover and fanfret angle.

IMG_1609176229.494114.jpg


The body has a Manzer wedge. At one point, I debated going with the larger JR body size, but I am starting to have some shoulder issues so going with the OMR body with the wedge seemed like a smart, long term move. I actually find bodies smaller than the OM more awkward to hold.

IMG_1609176284.626602.jpg
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  #35  
Old 12-30-2020, 11:10 AM
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Joel suggest we “ebonize” the neck. It was something I hadn’t considered and needed to think over a bit first. After seeing the last few pictures of the guitar all together, it made sense.

It takes Vaillant75 comment above on a black backplate a step further.

Here, a sealer wash has been applied in preparation for pore filling the back/sides.
IMG_1609347988.054959.jpg

Last edited by virob; 12-30-2020 at 11:13 AM. Reason: Spelling mistake
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  #36  
Old 01-01-2021, 09:00 AM
virob virob is offline
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Now for “New Year” reveal moment, I haven't been completely forthcoming, but then a little surprise can be fun. So far we have kept the color palate and inlay work to a minimum. The rationale for those decisions will now be clearer. While Joel was doing all the heavy lifting, I was doing a little experimenting at home as well, before shipping a package of materials to Joel, who then undertook a flurry of additional testing

IMG_1609513118.204561.jpg




.........Which resulted in....
















IMG_1609513143.724773.jpgIMG_1609513153.175535.jpgIMG_1609513160.513871.jpg

I am thrilled with how this is turning out!
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  #37  
Old 01-01-2021, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by virob View Post
Joel suggest we “ebonize” the neck. It was something I hadn’t considered and needed to think over a bit first. After seeing the last few pictures of the guitar all together, it made sense.

It takes Vaillant75 comment above on a black backplate a step further.

Here, a sealer wash has been applied in preparation for pore filling the back/sides.
Attachment 49182
Looking great, in particular that Honduran Rosewood and how you've minimized ornamentation around it. HRW has a special old wood look to it.
The coloring for the spruce really seems like it’s going to work well on this guitar.
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Last edited by ChuckS; 01-01-2021 at 12:01 PM.
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  #38  
Old 01-01-2021, 01:28 PM
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This is pretty interesting!

I have had some killer HRW instruments. This one should never get lost in a crowd!!!

Happy New Year

Paul
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  #39  
Old 01-01-2021, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7 View Post
Joel’s top bracing pattern actually reminds me of Florida luthier Simon Fay’s top bracing pattern. His back bracing is also derivative of Jeff Traugott’s floating beam ...

Over time, you see many luthiers evolve their approaches across their time at the bench.
To my knowledge, I was the first guy that used an upper transverse brace with a curve to compensate for the cutaway. It allows me to keep my x-brace where I want it without the upper transverse brace interfering on a cutaway build. My back bracing used to be quite similar to Jeff Traugott's but I've recently gone back to a slightly more traditional approach while still retaining a few differences. I'm pretty sure the floating back brace was his idea but the concept is not really new -- Kasha bracing has a similar but far more extravagant complexity to it.

Joel's top bracing is actually a fair bit different than mine but honestly, anything with an x-brace will bear more similarities than differences. One common denominator for those of us who build with very responsive and light tops is to make sure the bridge forces are appropriately dispersed, especially in the lower bout area. I don't think the placement and design matters all that much but rather how tight or loose you make that area with bracing height and strength. That said, I find Joel's top bracing very aesthetically pleasing and obviously, very well designed.

As the others have mentioned, this is going to be a striking guitar -- Congratulations on the build !!!
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  #40  
Old 01-01-2021, 02:42 PM
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I’m usually not into dyed wood, but that top is gorgeous. Between that and the e ebonized neck, I may have to change my position. Everything’s looking great so far!
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  #41  
Old 01-02-2021, 09:35 AM
virob virob is offline
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Originally Posted by ChuckS View Post
Looking great, in particular that Honduran Rosewood and how you've minimized ornamentation around it. HRW has a special old wood look to it.
The coloring for the spruce really seems like it’s going to work well on this guitar.

Thanks, I also think there is a good balance between the color of the HRW and coloured top. I like your description of “old wood look” for HRW, it nicely captures the HRW I have seen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitars44me View Post
This is pretty interesting!

I have had some killer HRW instruments. This one should never get lost in a crowd!!!

Happy New Year

Paul
I have yet to play a HRW guitar, and really looking forward to this one. It will obviously have a rosewood sound, but maybe a little less
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  #42  
Old 01-02-2021, 10:11 AM
virob virob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Fay View Post
To my knowledge, I was the first guy that used an upper transverse brace with a curve to compensate for the cutaway. It allows me to keep my x-brace where I want it without the upper transverse brace interfering on a cutaway build. My back bracing used to be quite similar to Jeff Traugott's but I've recently gone back to a slightly more traditional approach while still retaining a few differences. I'm pretty sure the floating back brace was his idea but the concept is not really new -- Kasha bracing has a similar but far more extravagant complexity to it.

Joel's top bracing is actually a fair bit different than mine but honestly, anything with an x-brace will bear more similarities than differences. One common denominator for those of us who build with very responsive and light tops is to make sure the bridge forces are appropriately dispersed, especially in the lower bout area. I don't think the placement and design matters all that much but rather how tight or loose you make that area with bracing height and strength. That said, I find Joel's top bracing very aesthetically pleasing and obviously, very well designed.

As the others have mentioned, this is going to be a striking guitar -- Congratulations on the build !!!
Thanks Simon. Very cool to know that you are the originator of that upper transverse curved bracing. Are you aware of others who are now using it as well?
Curious what made you step back from the floating back brace design?

I had to look up Kasha bracing. For those who are unfamiliar, it is worth looking up. Considering how long guitars have been around, most of the obvious bracing ideas have been explored over that time, but there are always new combinations and twists. For curved braces, Trevor Gore seems to have taken that to an interesting new level.
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  #43  
Old 01-02-2021, 10:50 AM
virob virob is offline
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Originally Posted by Archaic Guitars View Post
I’m usually not into dyed wood, but that top is gorgeous. Between that and the e ebonized neck, I may have to change my position. Everything’s looking great so far!
Haha! You know, I don’t disagree with you.
When I searched the internet for examples of dyed top guitars as examples I could send to Joel, there wasn’t much beyond the classic Gibson inspired burst. There were few I could find that I actually liked, but when done “right” (realizing that right is very subjective), can look amazing.

Some of the best at incorporating color seem to be those building archtop guitars. Why is that?

Last edited by virob; 01-02-2021 at 11:44 AM.
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  #44  
Old 01-02-2021, 01:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by virob View Post
Thanks Simon. Very cool to know that you are the originator of that upper transverse curved bracing. Are you aware of others who are now using it as well?
Curious what made you step back from the floating back brace design?

For curved braces, Trevor Gore seems to have taken that to an interesting new level.

I've seen a number of luthiers use it now. It's a good solution for certain bracing layouts. Regarding the floating brace, it restricted my ability to shape the back bracing the way I wanted - I prefer the sound of my guitars with my current back bracing. This isn't to say what I'm doing now is better -- guitars are systems and what works for one might not work the same way for another.

Trevor Gore is, indeed, a remarkably keen individual. To my knowledge, he is the individual who inspired a lot of luthiers to use the carbon fiber tows atop their bracing. I think his Falcate bracing has a lot of innovative ideas in it.
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  #45  
Old 01-04-2021, 12:33 PM
virob virob is offline
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The finish going on.
From what I have seen, the most commonly requested finish for Joel’s guitars is a spray on poly finish, often done by Vancouver Guitar Finishing. They do incredible work for a lot of builders, check out their website. Joel also offers a French polish finish.

In this build, Joel is applying a satin, in-wood finish. I’m not sure if he has had previous requests, or if this is the first, non-prototype, guitar with this particular finish.

I like the look and tactile feel, it begs to be touched.
IMG_1609784433.259117.jpg
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