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  #16  
Old 02-10-2019, 01:58 PM
frankmcr frankmcr is offline
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Just my understanding, based only on having been around a few years, but - Two different things … There's being unhappy when, for example, your wife runs off with your best friend and your pickup truck (cue steel guitar).

Then there's being unhappy even though things are going pretty good. Feelings of why bother, who cares, what's the point . . . "clinical depression". I think that has to be regarded and treated as an illness.

I wouldn't put any weight on the influence of conditions in general on either kind of "depression". Check out the 20th century: a whole series of small wars, constant international tension, then a big war with horrific casualties, followed by a devastating pandemic, then maybe a few okay years, then the 1930s & 40s, then the Cold War with the constant threat of nuclear attacks . . . Are things worse now?

As to an increase in depression, I think it's likely always been the same. Just underreported, either because people didn't know there was such a thing as clinical depression, or put it under the general rubric of "being crazy" and refused to consider that they had it.
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  #17  
Old 02-10-2019, 02:06 PM
buddyhu buddyhu is offline
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“Depression” merely suggests that certain symptoms are present. Some of those symptoms are physical (sleep disturbance, loss of appetite), some are psychological (feeling sad, lowered self-esteem), some are social (withdrawal from others, feeling lonely or isolated even without a change in the social network), some are cognitive (experience a slowing of the flow of thought, problems concentrating), and some could be considered spiritual (feeling cursed). The symptoms mentioned are only illustrative examples...there are many more that could fit in each category

Thus, in point of fact there are MANY different types of depression, and many different causes have already identified in the professional research.

It is also very important to know that anything that can truly be considered “depression” is fundamentally and importantly different from “everyday unhappiness” and “ordinary discontent”; these may have some similarity to depression, but also some crucial differences.

Some types of depression might well be increasing because of various societal challenges. In my opinion, the US is facing a crisis in purposefulness of work which spawns some depressions. And, the US is also facing a crisis about the meaningfulness of modern life, which gives rise to some depressions and some substance abuse disorders. Other cultures with developed economies may be facing similar crises.

Then again, the world has always “been mad”, so it would be hard to claim that the current madness is more depressing than the madness of previous generations. For example, I would regard the era of US Civil War (with the decades immediately before and after) to have been more depressing than now.

Certainly all types of depression have lost much of their stigma, and will therefore be diagnosed more often. And, because there are many treatments for depression that are successful (i .e. the treatments each provide relief or “cure” for certain range of depressive symptoms), people are more likely to seek treatment and therefore will be diagnosed.

It will be interesting to read other posts to this thread.
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  #18  
Old 02-10-2019, 02:19 PM
Nyghthawk Nyghthawk is offline
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For the the lower 3 quintiles of the population the economy is stagnant or moving backwards.

Opportunities for advancement are seriously curtailed.

Many of the near-retirement age folks are starting to realize they have no pension, not enough in their IRA, and Social Security won't alone allow for retirement.

Our children and grandchildren are inheriting the mess no matter who one blames for it.

Medical care, preventative, maintenance, and emergent care is all but prohibitively expensive.

On top of that there is the isolation associated with our increasingly electronic lives.
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  #19  
Old 02-10-2019, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankmcr View Post
Just my understanding, based only on having been around a few years, but - Two different things Ö There's being unhappy when, for example, your wife runs off with your best friend and your pickup truck (cue steel guitar).

Then there's being unhappy even though things are going pretty good. Feelings of why bother, who cares, what's the point . . . "clinical depression". I think that has to be regarded and treated as an illness....
Exactly. What I call Big D (clinical depression) and little d depression (feeling down with good cause)....
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  #20  
Old 02-10-2019, 03:17 PM
Kerbie Kerbie is offline
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We need to adhere to the rules in this thread, just like any other. Thanks.
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  #21  
Old 02-10-2019, 03:38 PM
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As mentioned above - there is deep seeded, lifelong depression, which can be genetic in some cases, and then there's a more "environmental" version.

I've seen how both can be something not to be ignored, and can certainly understand how the elderly population has been on the increase. Most of them were on the early years of the baby boomers and were small children during the end of the depression. They've never experienced the chaos we are experiencing in our world for so many reasons...up to and including the fact they've seen world population more than double in their lifetime.

For four years now, I've been living with my elderly parents - taking care of my Dad with dementia who passed a year ago. Mom has lifelong anxiety and depression issues and it's been harder to deal with by a long shot than my Dad's dememtia (who we kept at home much longer than we should have) There are times when I can feel her "attitudes" rubbing off on me - thank goodness for my music, exercise and golf to keep me centered. It's especially hard during the winter months to keep sane.

Individuals like my Mom will likely never find help unless they can get a great therapist who can help change the way they think and see things. There is no medication that is going to help that much, especially without major side effects.

So, in answer to the OP - depression takes on many forms. Some are possible to get through - others are much, much harder.
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  #22  
Old 02-10-2019, 03:41 PM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
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Is it increasing in incidence, or are more cases being diagnosed and reported ... ie; more people seeking treatment because of changing attitudes towards mental illness and treatment?
I think that this is a very reasonable observation.

When having my cancer treatment, I was told by one of the care nurses that it is now estimated that 50% of the population will get cancer.

Whilst no-one can say whether this is an increase, but certainly, far less people seem to die of "natural causes" any more.

Of course depression has long had a stigma - men were regarded as weak, and women ... foolish (?)

Thankfully, there is more , and informed help available from my country's health system and hopefully less drug and ECT usage.
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  #23  
Old 02-10-2019, 03:49 PM
leew3 leew3 is offline
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a quick note of appreciation for this thread, the tone and sensitivity displayed thus far. As others have noted Clinical Depression does indeed have underlying medical implications, yet the term is very complex and multifaceted. Those struggling with Clinical Depression are typically not depressed 'about' something, so the search for environmental causes or triggers will not be very fruitful.

I would submit that the increase is related to better identification and reduced stigma and celebrate both of these improvements.
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  #24  
Old 02-10-2019, 07:23 PM
Jaden Jaden is offline
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Originally Posted by fitness1 View Post
As mentioned above - there is deep seeded, lifelong depression, which can be genetic in some cases, and then there's a more "environmental" version.

I've seen how both can be something not to be ignored, and can certainly understand how the elderly population has been on the increase. Most of them were on the early years of the baby boomers and were small children during the end of the depression. They've never experienced the chaos we are experiencing in our world for so many reasons...up to and including the fact they've seen world population more than double in their lifetime.

For four years now, I've been living with my elderly parents - taking care of my Dad with dementia who passed a year ago. Mom has lifelong anxiety and depression issues and it's been harder to deal with by a long shot than my Dad's dememtia (who we kept at home much longer than we should have) There are times when I can feel her "attitudes" rubbing off on me - thank goodness for my music, exercise and golf to keep me centered. It's especially hard during the winter months to keep sane.

Individuals like my Mom will likely never find help unless they can get a great therapist who can help change the way they think and see things. There is no medication that is going to help that much, especially without major side effects.

So, in answer to the OP - depression takes on many forms. Some are possible to get through - others are much, much harder.
Thatís a tough situation doing in-home care; your momís condition is basically exactly like my mom her whole life, anxiety and depression, clinical, and for my brother and I and the in-home care workers it was a very tough and exhausting situation for all of us.

She has since passed away and I only wish it had been easier for her.

Nice to have you on the forum, Iíll keep you in my prayers.
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  #25  
Old 02-10-2019, 08:00 PM
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Exclamation Is depression an illness or a reaction to a world gone mad?

It is a never ending reminder of your part in the uneasy balance of a vast world of uncertainty. I'm surprised the subject of Veterans with depression hasn't seeped into this conversation...a huge contributor to the modern statistics of depression.
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  #26  
Old 02-10-2019, 09:14 PM
Staredge Staredge is offline
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Remember when the news was an hour long at dinner? One, maybe two newspapers a day? The world hasn't gotten any less crazy, we're just able to immerse ourselves in it 24/7. It's no wonder people are more stressed out.....we hear about everything that happens at the moment it happens, and then get to watch it live.
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  #27  
Old 02-10-2019, 11:41 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is offline
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Hi Davis,

The world has always been a mad place. Plenty of folks in the past suffered from depression but we just didn't have a name for it.

I do think that the interconnected world tends to feed on itself and over exaggerate the world's problems. Not that there aren't plenty of problems. But the Great Depression and World War II were pretty big events for my parents' generation to deal with. Some people are fighters, some conclude, What's the use? Some people can go through a Nazi death camp, lose their entire families, and still fight to survive.

I have provided music for a fair number of funerals for suicides. They are incredibly sad events. I always end up deeply affected over these services and the damage done to their families. It may be that a higher percentage of people today are more prone to depression compared to those of previous generations, but I am hardly an expert.

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  #28  
Old 02-11-2019, 07:02 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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I've been on both sides of the depression fence, and feel that it's largely misunderstood. Depression with a Big D is different from depression with a little d as I like to make the distinction. If you encounter a loss in your life, and you feel down temporarily, that might be depression with a small d. If everything is going well in your life, but you feel consistently sad, then you might be Depressed with a big D....
I agree with you, RP. Both small and big D can be overwhelming but the small gets better (or it becomes the big D). Sometimes Big D has nothing to do with a world gone mad or even our environment - it comes from within.
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  #29  
Old 02-11-2019, 07:19 AM
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...Sometimes Big D has nothing to do with a world gone mad or even our environment - it comes from within.
Exactly, and that's probably the distinction between the two. The original question positing that depression could be a reaction to a "world gone mad" suggests to me that it's not really Clinical (Big D) Depression. In my mind (and experience), true Clinical Depression persists during both good and bad times. Imagine seeing the world wearing dark glasses, hearing the world with fairly constant negative self-talk and navigating the world with bricks tied to your hands and feet. IMO Clinical Depression has an internal source....
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  #30  
Old 02-11-2019, 10:01 AM
Davis Webb Davis Webb is offline
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I wonder how much is generalized anxiety....

The data show disturbing increases...33% over 10 years is nasty if this were to be a trend.

Could it be also that our philosophy of life is changing and people are feeling less optimism or as we age, we are more prone to helpless feelings?

I teach seniors a lot and a few have said they have no reason to get up in the morning. Could it be that aging needs support, that the psychology of aging is such that increasing helplessness and poverty contribute?

But the alarming increase in kids....is this a trend or unmasking what was there?
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