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  #16  
Old 01-19-2019, 06:11 AM
llew llew is offline
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Seems Martin/Gibson/Taylor are all fighting for that price point in their respective lineups. I did hear the G-45 (don't know id it was the Studio or Standard) on a video from Music Villa and I thought it sounded great. Of course the guy who demos the guitars there is a fine player so that didn't hurt either?
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Last edited by llew; 01-20-2019 at 05:35 PM.
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  #17  
Old 01-19-2019, 07:00 AM
AndrewG AndrewG is offline
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They certainly look interesting, but so did the Gibson-branded Garrison Songmakers when Gibson attempted the cheap guitar thing. Sadly the looks didn't match the reality. Still, one hopes for the best with these announcements.
The problem I see is that there's already a wealth of similarly priced and really high quality offshore stuff that will doubtless out-spec these stripped down Gibson offerings, so we'll have to see how they fare against the competition.
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  #18  
Old 01-19-2019, 07:22 AM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade Hampton View Post
Gibson has a long and honorable history of using high quality laminates in professional level guitars: the J-160E’s that the Beatles used onstage and off were built completely out of laminates, including their tops. So if these new Gibsons have laminated backs and sides, as I suspect, they’ll be very good quality laminates, not cheapo plywood with mysterious, spongy softwood cores like entry level Asian-made guitars.


whm
Not to mention the J-200s from 1955 on. At the time Gibson made their own laminate claiming that it cost them more in labor and material than building with sold wood. Hard to tell if the laminate back and rim made any appreciable difference as the guitars also saw a return to the pre-1940 bracing footprint. So nothing to compare them with.
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Last edited by zombywoof; 01-19-2019 at 07:32 AM.
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  #19  
Old 01-19-2019, 08:05 AM
rwmct rwmct is offline
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Originally Posted by Rmz76 View Post
There's a lot more that goes into tone than just back and side wood material. Too much focus is put on the importance of the back and side material being solid. The body shape, bracing pattern, nut width, neck radius, scale length. I believe all these things play their part in tone in a direct or indirect way.

If the G-45 is indeed laminate a interesting comparison bound to eventually show up on YouTube would be to compare the Epiphone Masterbuild AJ45ME to the G-45. The AJ45ME is all solid, but has a shorter nut width and smaller body depth. The bracing pattern is based on the J-45 but it is unique to Epiphone so it's actually a very different guitar tone wise. Assuming the G-45 (Standard) uses the same body mold, bracing pattern and nut width as a J-45 Standard, it should produce a much closer tone and feel to the J-45 than even the all solid AJ45ME. It would give players with enough budget for an AJ45ME, Blueridge or Eastman an option to own a USA built Gibson branded slope shoulder, crafted in the Bozeman factory. A guitar with a solid Sitka Spruce top where the wood is sourced and conditioned the same as for the other Gibson USA models. If that's the guitar they are releasing, I think it will be a big hit for them.
I know there is more to tone than solid back and sides. FWIW, I was not very impressed with the one Epi Masterbuilt and one Fender Paramount I have seen (not much of a sample size, I know). I don't doubt some laminate guitars sound better.

OTH, I am hardly alone in preferring solid back and sides if I have the choice. When you get into the $600 to $700 range, you are getting close to the price range of some very good all solid imports.

(I also recognize that, truth be told, some "laminate" back and sides could fairly be characterized as "solid poplar" with a thin layer of something else on either side). I agree that characterizing that as "plywood" is unfair. )
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  #20  
Old 01-19-2019, 08:35 AM
jaymarsch jaymarsch is offline
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I wonder if these are being debuted at NAMM as we speak? Maybe one of the AGF members in attendance can give a report if they are indeed available there.

Best,
Jayne
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  #21  
Old 01-19-2019, 08:47 AM
gr81dorn gr81dorn is offline
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Originally Posted by jaymarsch View Post
I wonder if these are being debuted at NAMM as we speak? Maybe one of the AGF members in attendance can give a report if they are indeed available there.

Best,
Jayne
NAMM doesn’t start til the end of this coming week, but you know we’ll hear all about everything new and cool. One of my favorite weeks!
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  #22  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:14 AM
Triumph1050 Triumph1050 is offline
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Im not super thrilled...
Im a HUGE Gibson fan and one of the things I appreciate is the highendness(is that a word? lol) or exclusivity of a top production guitar. If you want "Gibson" on your headstock, save your pennies and earn one. Once thats achieved you'll appreciate ownership all that much more.
Not trying to sound like a guitarist snob because I really am not. Its just the market is flooded with $1000 and under guitars, Ive owned plenty of them. Id just like to continue to see Gibson stay "Gibson"... if you know what I mean.
Could just be me...
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  #23  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:20 AM
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Photojeep Photojeep is offline
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I would be very interested in hearing how these sound. After all, that really is what I interested in and listen for. (YMMV of course)

As for Gibson making a lam b/s guitar, don't forget that several upper level boutique luthiers make "laminated" b/s guitars and people gush over them all the time.

Of course all of this could be a moot point as none of us knows AT ALL if these are solid or lam b/s. It's all just speculation on our part...

Just sayin,
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  #24  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Triumph1050 View Post
one of the things I appreciate is the highendness(is that a word? lol) or exclusivity of a top production guitar. If you want "Gibson" on your headstock, save your pennies and earn one.
I generally agree with this, although in the electric world Fender has certainly done the opposite, with great success. Instead of relegating all their non-USA-made models exclusively to "Squier" status (as Gibson has done with Epiphone), Fender has a few tiers of "Fender"-branded guitars, including Mexico and PacRim-produced models. The American-built ones are still very much in demand, and folks still save their pennies for them.

At least these new Gibsons are going to be made in the USA, and to me that justifies the higher prices than Epiphone, Taylor's 100 & 200s, etc., while still being within reach of the budget-minded buyer.

While I'll probably never buy one, it makes me wonder what took them so long!
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  #25  
Old 01-19-2019, 10:45 AM
RussL30 RussL30 is offline
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I own a solid mahogany Gibson and a laminated mahogany back Gibson and love them both. The Gospel cost under $1000 about 23 or 24 years ago and I got my LG2 for around $1200 used. I love the fact that you can get a nice Bozeman made solid wood Gibson for around a grand or a little more (speaking used J15, LG2. J35, J30).

It’s also pretty awesome that someone who can’t pay over a $1000 can get a Bozeman made Gibson that although it has laminated back and sides is still topped and braced like other Gibsons. If that can inspire someone to play and make music who’s always wanted a Gibson but can’t yet afford it, the. I’m all for it.

The price isn’t out of line with Taylors laminated models and it’s a better value being made in the US in the same factory as J45’s and hummingbirds. I’m not knocking Mexican Taylors as I really like my GS mini and several of the MIM Taylors that I’ve played, but being US made does add value. I also think it’s a better value than a $600 Martin X series model with the stratabond necks.

I like the direction Gibson is going so far with new management.
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  #26  
Old 01-19-2019, 11:53 AM
AndrewG AndrewG is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RussL30 View Post
I own a solid mahogany Gibson and a laminated mahogany back Gibson and love them both. The Gospel cost under $1000 about 23 or 24 years ago and I got my LG2 for around $1200 used. I love the fact that you can get a nice Bozeman made solid wood Gibson for around a grand or a little more (speaking used J15, LG2. J35, J30).

It’s also pretty awesome that someone who can’t pay over a $1000 can get a Bozeman made Gibson that although it has laminated back and sides is still topped and braced like other Gibsons. If that can inspire someone to play and make music who’s always wanted a Gibson but can’t yet afford it, the. I’m all for it.

The price isn’t out of line with Taylors laminated models and it’s a better value being made in the US in the same factory as J45’s and hummingbirds. I’m not knocking Mexican Taylors as I really like my GS mini and several of the MIM Taylors that I’ve played, but being US made does add value. I also think it’s a better value than a $600 Martin X series model with the stratabond necks.

I like the direction Gibson is going so far with new management.
I hear what you say, but who made a guitar and where, added value, a name on a headstock are things I can't hear. My experience with previous lower cost Gibsons (notably a J35 I kept for a week and swapped back for a Yamaha), was less than edifying. I'm not overly optimistic about this new line, because I can guarantee 100% that I'll be able to buy a far better instrument made outside the US for a similar cost, but I remain open-minded until I can play one

Last edited by AndrewG; 01-19-2019 at 12:00 PM.
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  #27  
Old 01-19-2019, 12:03 PM
ataylor ataylor is offline
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I like companies that are willing to put their name on more affordable models — Taylor, Martin, Fender come to mind.

I’d rather see Gibson guitars based off classic Gibson designs in this price range than Epiphone guitars based off classic Gibson designs.
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  #28  
Old 01-19-2019, 12:11 PM
AndrewG AndrewG is offline
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Originally Posted by ataylor View Post
I like companies that are willing to put their name on more affordable models — Taylor, Martin, Fender come to mind.

I’d rather see Gibson guitars based off classic Gibson designs in this price range than Epiphone guitars based off classic Gibson designs.
Yes, I can't argue with that. I've played a few decent Epiphones, but the Gibson copies just look wrong with that headstock. Of course Texans, Casinos, Broadways, Coronets etc., look just fine being original US Epiphone models.
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  #29  
Old 01-19-2019, 12:47 PM
ataylor ataylor is offline
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Originally Posted by AndrewG View Post
Yes, I can't argue with that. I've played a few decent Epiphones, but the Gibson copies just look wrong with that headstock. Of course Texans, Casinos, Broadways, Coronets etc., look just fine being original US Epiphone models.
Agreed on all points. I really like my Lennon reissue Epiphone Casino. Wouldn’t trade it for a 330
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  #30  
Old 01-19-2019, 03:33 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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I'm looking forward to trying one out. Let's see and hear what they are.

I applaud the effort.
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