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  #1  
Old 12-13-2013, 10:46 AM
Dogsnax Dogsnax is offline
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Default John Williams reflects on Segovia

Good for John Williams, setting the record straight.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/201...s-segovia-snob
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Old 12-13-2013, 04:30 PM
ZippyChip ZippyChip is offline
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Default Segovia

This is as good a time as ever to admit something I rarely mention. I never liked Segovias' playing. I thought his style was too stiff.
I thought his treatment of Chapdelain (in video) was rough.
I did take the time to see him play though--got to see the legends when you can. I saw him perform in Milwaukee when he was 80'ish.
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Old 12-13-2013, 04:34 PM
bfloyd6969 bfloyd6969 is offline
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I hope I can still play when I'm in my 80's.
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Old 12-13-2013, 05:17 PM
Dogsnax Dogsnax is offline
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I think Segovia's significance comes from his elevation of the classical guitar to a more significant classical instrument and repertoire. I've never been too impressed with his recordings and I agree about the Chapdelaine master class video. It's absolutely painful to watch. Michael just happens to be one of the contemporary classical guitars who makes classical guitar "cool" - he doesn't worry about tradition or classical expectations. He's a fine steel-string player as well.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:30 PM
Malty Malty is offline
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Thanks for the interesting link. I was aware of the claim by Williams that Barrios was the greatest who ever lived but was not aware of some of the backstory involving him and Segovia.

I am far from knowledgeable on these guys but I am not surprised that a great player can be a mediocre teacher. Such a scenario get repeated constantly in the world of professional sports.
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Old 12-14-2013, 08:13 PM
Paikon Paikon is offline
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From my experience I will say that teachers that are not pleasing produce good students and vice versa....excuse my English

I don't know who are John Williams students to compare With Segovia students but if we are gonna do this we must know that they lived in different eras

..Williams continues what Segovia started

its like comparing 30s music with 80s
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:50 PM
KenW KenW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bfloyd6969 View Post
I hope I can still play when I'm in my 80's.
Not only that.....at 76 he married a 23 year old and fathered a son.
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Old 12-14-2013, 10:30 PM
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Bern Bern is offline
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My question is, why would anyone want to get instructions from Segovia and not adhere to his methods ?
Personally, I think, creativity starts after having had instructions from an experienced refined teacher. A teacher can never teach creativity.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:22 PM
Will Kirk Will Kirk is offline
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There's a certain balance to be had in teaching. With kids today in my 6 years of teaching I never had good luck getting them to "sound like this" but rather they seem more responsive to things like "sound like you" if that makes sense.

I can understand where Segovia was coming from but in all honesty having read and watched his interviews, he was quite the snob even in that era. Williams just confirms what I already thought.

We have snobs even today, the issue is not what they think of the music though, remember we don't play guitar to make critics happy.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:29 PM
donh donh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenW View Post
Not only that.....at 76 he married a 23 year old and fathered a son.
I weep for anyone that considers this a positive.

That kid has a rough way to go.
.
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Old 12-15-2013, 01:03 AM
Paikon Paikon is offline
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Will Kirk @ Virtuosos of any instrument don't teach kids!
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Old 12-15-2013, 08:42 AM
KenW KenW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donh View Post
I weep for anyone that considers this a positive.

That kid has a rough way to go.
.
Looks like it turned out alright for him:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Andr%C3%A9s_Segovia
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Old 12-15-2013, 09:04 AM
ecguitar44 ecguitar44 is offline
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Interesting.

I wonder how much of that was just sensationalism on the part of John to "sell more books"...

Segovia's impact can not be underestimated.

However, I've never been a fan of his playing. It never spoke to me. Mostly, I think, because I felt it lacked dynamics and "breath".
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:04 PM
sausgirl sausgirl is offline
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Hey all,
This "declaration" doesn't surprise me at all.If you watch the Christopher Nupen films (Allegro Films) of Segovia, you see his over the top style. Nupen, was a student of Segovia and good friend of Williams also . Often times, innovators are raised to the lofty heights of Gods,and aren't particularly good teachers. I felt that was about Segovia and Casals too.Too much ego, not enough self awareness.
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:02 PM
VictorS VictorS is offline
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I realize Segovia elevated the classical guitar in the twentieth century as an important instrument. Like most others in this thread I find his recordings and performances stodgy and uninspiring. When I listen to John Williams I feel emotion, passion and most importantly awe inspiring drop your jaw excitement and amazement. His rendition of Asturias decimates Segovia's sloppy lackluster attempt both from an inspiration level and a technical performance level.
He simply doesn't appear to be human in this performance and every time I watch it I want to shoot my hand!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDAHl54V0CU
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Last edited by VictorS; 12-17-2013 at 08:12 PM.
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