The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > RECORD

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-17-2009, 01:29 PM
missouri.picker missouri.picker is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,478
Default help with editing software suggestion

hi I use the BR1600CD for live recording, it only has a USB output as opposed to each channel out. I want to get computer editing software, any ideas as to what would be the best software for editing and mastering? thanks in advance.
Donnell
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-17-2009, 06:06 PM
Herb Hunter Herb Hunter is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Maine
Posts: 18,379
Default

Will you be using a Windows based computer or a Macintosh?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-17-2009, 07:54 PM
rick-slo's Avatar
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 12,967
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by missouri.picker View Post
hi I use the BR1600CD for live recording, it only has a USB output as opposed to each channel out. I want to get computer editing software, any ideas as to what would be the best software for editing and mastering? thanks in advance.
Donnell
First off there is no "Best". People will chime in with what they have used and are familiar with be it Adobe Audition, Steinberg WaveLab, Cakewalk Sonar, freebie Reaper, etc. I like Ableton Live myself probably because it is what I started with I know my way around in it. They will all sound the same until you start messing around with changing the sound with things like compression, equalization and reverb....and talking about that they do not come with the best of these so you likely want a program that is VST plugin compatible so that you can take advantage of those. These programs often have way more features than you will ever use so the Lite versions if available may be a good buy.
__________________
Derek Coombs
Website -> Music -> Tabs -> CDs and Youtube
Guitars by Mark Blanchard, Albert&Mueller, Paul Woolson, Collings, Composite Acoustics, and Derek Coombs
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-18-2009, 08:21 AM
missouri.picker missouri.picker is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,478
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Hunter View Post
Will you be using a Windows based computer or a Macintosh?
Vista based
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-18-2009, 08:23 AM
missouri.picker missouri.picker is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,478
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
First off there is no "Best". People will chime in with what they have used and are familiar with be it Adobe Audition, Steinberg WaveLab, Cakewalk Sonar, freebie Reaper, etc. I like Ableton Live myself probably because it is what I started with I know my way around in it. They will all sound the same until you start messing around with changing the sound with things like compression, equalization and reverb....and talking about that they do not come with the best of these so you likely want a program that is VST plugin compatible so that you can take advantage of those. These programs often have way more features than you will ever use so the Lite versions if available may be a good buy.
VST ? video? yes I do want video compatibility.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-20-2009, 10:21 AM
SteveBlueenote SteveBlueenote is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South East Pa
Posts: 36
Default

I'm just learning myself, it is a VERY complex world. There are allot of good books to help you along the way. The software I found to have a good combo of power and ease of use is Ableton Live 8. I like it because it has help systems built into it. The Ableton site also has allot of tutorials, movies, and help. I tried Sonar and didn't like it. I even read a large book on it (Sonar Power), but found it a crude interface and less flexible. It's probably more suited for pros. Ableton is much more polished and consumer friendly but still powerful.

The nice thing is, you can try all this software for yourself. Most major vendors offer free demos you can download. This way you can see what suites your needs before you buy. Also, most vendors also offer different prices for different levels of features of their tools.

Plan on 10+ hours to get up to speed on either of the packages above. Also, you'll have to learn how to route the signal from your guitar through an interface, into the computer, into the interface software, into and out of the recording software, out of the interface software or out to a soundcard, and into monitors... That alone can take quite a while to learn due to all the hardware and software switches involved.

Best of luck, and hang in there while learning!

Quote:
Originally Posted by missouri.picker View Post
hi I use the BR1600CD for live recording, it only has a USB output as opposed to each channel out. I want to get computer editing software, any ideas as to what would be the best software for editing and mastering? thanks in advance.
Donnell
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-20-2009, 10:31 AM
Fran Guidry Fran Guidry is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 3,445
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by missouri.picker View Post
VST ? video? yes I do want video compatibility.
VST refers to a plugin format. An audio editor or sequencer that works as a VST host can add features in the form of .dll files. There are many great free VST plugins as well as an industry turning out commercial items.

There are other plugin formats in use as well. Check KVR http://www.kvraudio.com/ for an overview of what's out there.

Fran
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-20-2009, 10:34 AM
ljguitar's Avatar
ljguitar ljguitar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: wyoming
Posts: 38,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBlueenote View Post
...Plan on 10+ hours to get up to speed on either of the packages above.
Hi Steve...
That would be true of any recording and editing system I've ever seen/used. There is a curve, and actually 10 hours will get most people up and recording, editing basic tracks, and mixing stuff satisfactorily.

But for most of us (unless you've done audio/video editing on a regular basis before) quite a few more hours than that will be required to refine the process...

Actually, I just started out by learning enough of the basics to make some pretty good recordings. I used the tutorials and reference materials to work through log-jams, and then every 3-4 months went back & read the manuals. It was amazing how much I learned by 'hands-on' problem solving, and then understood when I read the instruction manuals later.

All in all, recording and producing music is a lot of fun!
__________________
Larry J

Baby #01
Baby #02
Baby #03
Baby #04
Full-size Full-Scale Baby #4

Larry's songs...

…Just because you've argued till a discussion turns silent doesn't mean you have convinced anyone…
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-20-2009, 11:04 AM
SteveBlueenote SteveBlueenote is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South East Pa
Posts: 36
Default

I agree, LJ, the whole process of fiddling with software and listening to the results is allot of fun (once you get over the frustration). It also does require allot of time and commitment.

I guess I should have mentioned, I work with computers 8 hours a day (systems designer and programmer). I should also mention about the guitar/computer signal routing, took me over 8 hours in and of itself to learn well enough to quickly trouble shoot (I'm using a Motu 828MK3 with it's complex iface sofware). I have about 30 hours into fiddling, learning, & recording to date but only know about 10% of what I need to learn to make a good recording. It does take a long time, no doubt. What helped me the most, was getting over the expectation that it was going to be easy. My expectation of ease kept hitting the reality of NOT SO EASY and my innate laziness struggled with that for quite a while ;-)



Quote:
Originally Posted by ljguitar View Post
Hi Steve...
But for most of us (unless you've done audio/video editing on a regular basis before) quite a few more hours than that will be required to refine the process...
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-20-2009, 12:37 PM
ljguitar's Avatar
ljguitar ljguitar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: wyoming
Posts: 38,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBlueenote View Post
...My expectation of ease kept hitting the reality of NOT SO EASY and my innate laziness struggled with that for quite a while ;-)
Hi Steve...
Discussion forums often bring quicker answers - they are a great resource these days...

Never heard of iFace software - MOTUs default is Audio Desk. Is there another package out there now?
__________________
Larry J

Baby #01
Baby #02
Baby #03
Baby #04
Full-size Full-Scale Baby #4

Larry's songs...

…Just because you've argued till a discussion turns silent doesn't mean you have convinced anyone…
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-20-2009, 01:17 PM
SteveBlueenote SteveBlueenote is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South East Pa
Posts: 36
Default

Sorry about that, iFace abbreviation for Interface. The Interface software for the 828 is CueMix FX which has more ways to route a signal than you can shake a stick at. I think the CueMix io options kept me busy for 4 hours before I even got static through a monitor. Motu should really include CueMix for dummies, to make it easier for beginners to begin learning their devices.

While we are talking about recording, what mic would you recommend to get the most natural sound of a guitar into a computer? Let's say, best for less than $100 and best for less than $300? I know I need a new mic, I'm using a $50 sorry old Audio Technia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljguitar View Post
Hi Steve...
Discussion forums often bring quicker answers - they are a great resource these days...

Never heard of iFace software - MOTUs default is Audio Desk. Is there another package out there now?

Last edited by SteveBlueenote; 06-20-2009 at 01:47 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-20-2009, 09:45 PM
ljguitar's Avatar
ljguitar ljguitar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: wyoming
Posts: 38,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBlueenote View Post
Sorry about that, iFace abbreviation for Interface. The Interface software for the 828 is CueMix FX which has more ways to route a signal than you can shake a stick at. I think the CueMix io options kept me busy for 4 hours before I even got static through a monitor. Motu should really include CueMix for dummies, to make it easier for beginners to begin learning their devices.

While we are talking about recording, what mic would you recommend to get the most natural sound of a guitar into a computer? Let's say, best for less than $100 and best for less than $300? I know I need a new mic, I'm using a $50 sorry old Audio Technia.
Hi Steve...
Oh I get it Interface - ok.

I don't use CueMix, but the built in mixer in Audio Desk - which as simpler to setup. I'm going to have to re-wade these waters as my MOTU UltraLite will be delivered next week.

Hopefully I can adapt to it more quickly than you did - moving from Mac OS 9 to OS-X (have not had our old studio in operation for a couple years now).

I like the 3/4'' capsule mics for guitars best, and I used Rode NT-3s for about 6 years, and then moved to a pair of matched Peluso CEMC6 with interchangeable capsules. It was an improvement or refinement, and for not that much of a cost upgrade.

The Rodes have a lot of high end presence; the Peluso are smoother. The Rode NT-3 are around $250-ish, the Peluso $350-ish. Also, I like the sound of the Octavas I've heard used by Edward (Zenpicker) here in the forum for his recording.

The Behringer B-2 (large diaphragm) and B-5 (.7'' med-sm diaphragm) are the bargin mics which surprised me on a friend's rig.
__________________
Larry J

Baby #01
Baby #02
Baby #03
Baby #04
Full-size Full-Scale Baby #4

Larry's songs...

…Just because you've argued till a discussion turns silent doesn't mean you have convinced anyone…
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-20-2009, 10:04 PM
SteveBlueenote SteveBlueenote is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: South East Pa
Posts: 36
Default

Cool, thanks for the info on the mics, there are so many choices out there this info will be valuable when I buy a new mic! If you get a chance, here's a video on CueMix
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jz5OBEcNw7s
It's a concise video, but will give you an idea of what is going on with it.

PS: If you record @ 192, you can't use the effects such as echo etc... That's the fine print Motu doesn't advertise too loudly. But, when your UltraLite arrives, get ready for some pristine, clear, & quite recording. Also, play with the latency if you use firewire. Depending on your system, you can get it down to about 30ms or so, which is almost 0. You should have an easier go at it than I, I'm using Windows XP and totaly new to audio recording ;-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljguitar View Post
Hi Steve...
Oh I get it Interface - ok.

I don't use CueMix, but the built in mixer in Audio Desk - which as simpler to setup. I'm going to have to re-wade these waters as my MOTU UltraLite will be delivered next week.

Hopefully I can adapt to it more quickly than you did - moving from Mac OS 9 to OS-X (have not had our old studio in operation for a couple years now).

I like the 3/4'' capsule mics for guitars best, and I used Rode NT-3s for about 6 years, and then moved to a pair of matched Peluso CEMC6 with interchangeable capsules. It was an improvement or refinement, and for not that much of a cost upgrade.

The Rodes have a lot of high end presence; the Peluso are smoother. The Rode NT-3 are around $250-ish, the Peluso $350-ish. Also, I like the sound of the Octavas I've heard used by Edward (Zenpicker) here in the forum for his recording.

The Behringer B-2 (large diaphragm) and B-5 (.7'' med-sm diaphragm) are the bargin mics which surprised me on a friend's rig.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-21-2009, 12:26 AM
ljguitar's Avatar
ljguitar ljguitar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: wyoming
Posts: 38,542
Default

Sorry MP...
I got mixed up and thought Steve started the thread...after this post I'll end the dialogue on MOTU hardware/software and let the thread return to normal...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveBlueenote View Post
...when your UltraLite arrives, get ready for some pristine, clear, & quite recording. Also, play with the latency if you use firewire. Depending on your system, you can get it down to about 30ms or so, which is almost 0. You should have an easier go at it than I, I'm using Windows XP and totaly new to audio recording ;-)
Hi Steve...
I used MOTU 2408 Firewire interfaces for 8 years in studio, and they are why I returned to the MOTU UltraLite after not doing any recording in a couple years.

The MOTU gear is top-shelf. The UltraLite does more than my 2408 rigs did, and costs half what they cost!

Thanks for the video on CueMix. I'll have time to check it out on the other side of Sunday...

I never record above 44.1kHz, nor do I plan to.

I tried recording initially with and without CueMix, and ultimately decided to record without it for the sake of simplicity, and for running a lean system to create a non-latency environment (taxing the system produces problems as well as latency).

We recorded to external drives for similar reasons...it seems like a lot to expect the computer to run the system, operate the recording software and record all to the same drive simultaneously. Recording to an external firewire drive relieved pressure from the System drive...it also makes it possible to record on one machine and edit on another.

I was using what would now be considered primitive gear...(OS 9 on a dedicated Mac G4/G5 500mhz). It was never hooked to the internet and the computer was only loaded with software to record, mix or burn CDs. We had the latency virtually undetectable...so I'm expecting the new 'box' to be as good or better in all regards.

It only crashed once in 8 years, and that was when someone in the other room popped the cable out of an active firewire drive while we were in session on the other side of the wall. We plugged it back in, rebooted and had not lost anything, so we carried on...

__________________
Larry J

Baby #01
Baby #02
Baby #03
Baby #04
Full-size Full-Scale Baby #4

Larry's songs...

…Just because you've argued till a discussion turns silent doesn't mean you have convinced anyone…
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-21-2009, 07:15 AM
rmyAddison rmyAddison is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Addison, TX
Posts: 19,014
Default

As mentioned there are tons of producst out there.

I use ProTools LE on a dedicated PC, and Sony Vegas Movie Studio when I want to do Youtube videos.

Bottom line is it can be as simple or complex as you want and as inexpensive or expensive as you want, choose your poison, have fun!
__________________
Rich - rmyAddison

Rich Macklin Soundclick Website
http://www.youtube.com/rmyaddison

Martin OM-18 Authentic '33 Adirondack/Mahogany
Martin CS OM-28 Alpine/Madagascar
Martin CS 00-42 Adirondack/Madagascar
Martin OM-45TB (2005) Engelmann/Tasmanian Blackwood (#23 of 29)
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > RECORD

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=