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  #16  
Old 01-06-2021, 03:53 PM
nickv6 nickv6 is offline
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There's a tuition video on Travis picking by that French guitarist who was brilliant but sadly died young.
He states quite clearly that you'll have to learn to do it to get that Travis sound.
I've seen Thom bresh talk about it too.
Marcel something was the French chaps name.
Generally, I've seen lots of people do it and learned to do it myself too.
Nick
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  #17  
Old 01-06-2021, 04:32 PM
sam.spoons sam.spoons is offline
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Originally Posted by eisemann View Post
I couldn't find the interview of Tommy Emmanuel I've watched some time ago. He was talking about it and now that i try to play the style I realized the need of that, it really makes your playing economy better but then again you dont really have to depend on this, I was just asking. But i can find many instances of this technique. Especially in gypsy jazz they play chords structured like that. Not that you have to play the chords like that but to get a fuller sound they add one extra bass note. With that you obtain more freedom for one finger. Hence, it makes this technique really important to work on, cause you know freedom is everything, especially on your fingers.
IME Gypsy Jazz players don't play two bass notes with one finger but often mute the A string with the finger that is fretting the low E. They do play the D and G strings with a flattened ring finger on some chords, echoing the technique developed by Django to take account of his damaged fingers* but I don't think that is what you are suggesting is it?

* Django's ring and little fingers were badly burned and partially fused together so he played lead with just his first and second fingers but could use the others to play chords. He played mostly three note chord voicings but did have some four note chords.
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  #18  
Old 01-07-2021, 06:57 AM
eisemann eisemann is offline
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Originally Posted by sam.spoons View Post
IME Gypsy Jazz players don't play two bass notes with one finger but often mute the A string with the finger that is fretting the low E. They do play the D and G strings with a flattened ring finger on some chords, echoing the technique developed by Django to take account of his damaged fingers* but I don't think that is what you are suggesting is it?

* Django's ring and little fingers were badly burned and partially fused together so he played lead with just his first and second fingers but could use the others to play chords. He played mostly three note chord voicings but did have some four note chords.
I'm not sure but I've found a guy that talks about it, not explaining thoroughly sadly. Check the minute 2:27
Now thats the only thing i could find but i've seen tommy emmanuel do it and talk about it. Anyway i dont think there is really a way to do it other than working hard on it.
I'm sure you dont have to be conservative about the forum.
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2021, 07:24 AM
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srick srick is offline
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Originally Posted by nickv6 View Post
There's a tuition video on Travis picking by that French guitarist who was brilliant but sadly died young.
He states quite clearly that you'll have to learn to do it to get that Travis sound.
I've seen Thom bresh talk about it too.
Marcel something was the French chaps name.
Generally, I've seen lots of people do it and learned to do it myself too.
Nick
Marcel Dadi - Guitarvideos.com. Sadly, he was killed in the Flight 800 explosion over Long Island in 1996.

Very good video, but I find it difficult to listen through Marcel's accent.

I believe the closest lesson to Merle Travis' style is Thom Bresh's video from Homespun - "Like Father, Like Son" As you may know, Bresh is Travis' son. Bresh shows Merle's style to be very loose and free, you just have to know Travis' unique fingering. His techniques show it can be a lot easier than the tab makes it appear to be once you see the tricks that Merle used.

best,

Rick
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Last edited by srick; 01-07-2021 at 07:42 AM.
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