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  #16  
Old 12-26-2021, 12:57 PM
RRuskin RRuskin is online now
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I go direct nearly all the time with any of my electrics - single coil or humbuckers. If I decide I want the sound of an amp, I'll re-amp at mixdown.
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  #17  
Old 12-26-2021, 12:58 PM
Guavadude Guavadude is offline
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I go direct on a lot of sessions for that Prince clean funk sound. A Tele into a compressor pedal direct is a great sound and entirely different than using an amp. A lot of current pop tracks use this technique.
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  #18  
Old 12-26-2021, 01:00 PM
FrankHudson FrankHudson is offline
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Glennwillow points out some key advantages: you aren't locked in to the one, original, sound of a guitar part. Instead you can decide when the piece is in the mixing stage how much gain, reverb, what EQ or other effects to apply.

In my "Studio B" small home office I use an IK Multimedia Axe I/O and their Amplitube modeling software along with the stuff in Apple Logic. Not only can I record completely silently, and sync time-based effects to a track's tempo if I want to, I can change my mind about the final sound later. The Axe I/O is particularly nice for this in that it has an adjustable impedance knob that seems to help a bit as well as a JFET setting that fattens up direct in electric bass in a nice way.

My understanding of direct to the mixing desk electric guitar recording was more common in the LP era than many realized. Studio compressors and preamps were adding the gain and attack profile we seek to emulate with guitar amps and stomp boxes.

"What amp to use to get the distorted lead sound of the Beatles "Revolution" single or the powerful Byrds 12-string lead, etc?" In Real Life was direct to the board with studio compression. And a less effected direct in sound is nice for some rhythm parts, think Nile Rodgers style.
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  #19  
Old 12-26-2021, 07:28 PM
Paleolith54 Paleolith54 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankHudson View Post
Glennwillow points out some key advantages: you aren't locked in to the one, original, sound of a guitar part. Instead you can decide when the piece is in the mixing stage how much gain, reverb, what EQ or other effects to apply.

In my "Studio B" small home office I use an IK Multimedia Axe I/O and their Amplitube modeling software along with the stuff in Apple Logic. Not only can I record completely silently, and sync time-based effects to a track's tempo if I want to, I can change my mind about the final sound later. The Axe I/O is particularly nice for this in that it has an adjustable impedance knob that seems to help a bit as well as a JFET setting that fattens up direct in electric bass in a nice way.

My understanding of direct to the mixing desk electric guitar recording was more common in the LP era than many realized. Studio compressors and preamps were adding the gain and attack profile we seek to emulate with guitar amps and stomp boxes.

"What amp to use to get the distorted lead sound of the Beatles "Revolution" single or the powerful Byrds 12-string lead, etc?" In Real Life was direct to the board with studio compression. And a less effected direct in sound is nice for some rhythm parts, think Nile Rodgers style.
"According to Geoff Emerick (the studio engineer for that session), he had John Lennon and George Harrison running their guitars directly into the mixing desk. The guitar tone is a result of one channel on the mixing desk being run into another. Both of these channels were driven well beyond their normal operating capacity. Bad news for the desk (it could have overheated and caused permanent damage), good news for guitar tone history!"
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  #20  
Old 12-27-2021, 07:23 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is offline
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Adding to the comments from Frank Hudson and Paleolith, when Roger McGuinn recorded with the Byrds, songs like Mr Tambourine Man were recorded with his Rickenbacker 12-string direct to the board and with a great deal of compression on the guitar track.

- Glenn
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2022, 02:20 PM
sharkydude50 sharkydude50 is offline
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Default Electric DI to PA

I was asked to run my electrics (an Epi LP & Tele) thru a DI to the soundboard at church. For me there was too much reliance on the sound person getting me up to the right spot in the mix, so I now run an amp on stage to control my level.
I have a multi effects pedal (Zoom G3Xn) that is in front of the DI, so I do add a lot of effects before sending my signal to the house.
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2022, 04:39 PM
PetesaHut PetesaHut is offline
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I play only play my guitars at home.

I connect to my computer via Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 and Eris-series E3.5 studio monitor speakers.

I have a Fender Tonemaster Deluxe Reverb which is great but rarely use it.

I'm have everything from a Gretch to Strats and Teles. A clean sound which is fine by me.
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  #23  
Old 01-08-2022, 10:16 PM
Scott of the Sa Scott of the Sa is offline
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When I play electric guitar, it is ALWAYS through an amp. Period.
I had a line 6 Pod that had great amp sims and effects.... I sold it, I didn't like it at all. When I am recording, I would rather play through an amp and get my sound even if it is clean, then add effects later.
When playing live, I like to use amps for Guitar and Bass and use the PA for vocals and acoustic guitar. If it is a big venue, they can mic the amp or get a direct signal from my effects preamp.
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