The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #16  
Old 10-21-2018, 08:31 AM
Mbroady's Avatar
Mbroady Mbroady is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Asheville via NYC
Posts: 3,515
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vibrolucky View Post
Thanks very much - yes I'm very proud of it. I actually played it a few days before adding the pickguard, can't tell any difference in tone. Its a 'tor-tis' from LMII. Wanted something a little different from a generic teardrop shape, and the lines of this (small body Gibson style) seemed to look better to my eye.
That is great that you had the opportunity to compare pre and post pick guard.
Not hearimg a difference seems to align with what most builders say.

I have a guitar that has a clear pick guard on it and will be switching to a more traditional style. The Tor-tis was recommended. Very little mass is what I was told.
__________________
Furch D25SR,
Furch D34SR For Sale https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/...d.php?t=519406
Furch D32LM
Voyage Air VAD-2
Rainsong H-WS1000N2T
Tacoma Papoose
72 Fender Strat
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-21-2018, 08:43 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 5,696
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vibrolucky View Post
... once you start on the rosette & bracing its too late to make the top thinner.
Many makers will do additional, selective thinning of the top, particularly around the edges of the lower bout, after the body has been assembled - usually before rabbeting for the binding. How much to remove, and where, is determined by whatever method(s) a maker chooses, be it deflection testing with weights or thumb pressure, tapping or vibration analysis (e.g. Chladni testing).

Many makers will plane one side of the top, install the rosette, then thickness the top from the underside/inside, prior to cutting out the sound hole.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-21-2018, 03:06 PM
Will Kirk Will Kirk is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vibrolucky View Post
Yes, but after screwing up two others 😌I left it as is. Action turned out perfect, and the sound was great so I just gave up. Took me 4 pieces of bone on the Nut as well, but hey I learned from this and hopefully can make some improvements!
Itís pretty solid under string pressure so Iím not sweating it. Iíve also added a heal cap since I took this photo.

Thanks for all the comments everyone!
Makes sense. Sometimes you just have to roll with it. Good job for keeping at it and getting it done.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-30-2018, 11:11 AM
WaddyT's Avatar
WaddyT WaddyT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 681
Default

That is a nice job for a first! Expectations for a first guitar are usually far beyond capabilities to produce a great sounding guitar. Most first guitars are a complicated woodworking project alone. Great sound comes with experience and knowledge. That said, most first guitars will sound better than most off the shelf production guitars.
__________________
Waddy
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=