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  #1  
Old 08-31-2018, 04:30 PM
lacatedral lacatedral is offline
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Arrow Recommendations for an electric classical guitar.

Greetings, I'm interested in buying an electric classical guitar or classical guitar.

I don't have a very high budget: between 815 to 950 american dollars. I was thinking of a Takamine G Series EG128SC.
I really like Igor Presnyakov's sound, although I can't find Presnyakov model or brand (I don't know which guitar he's using, and I doubt I can afford the money):



So the questions:

1) Recommendations of a specific brand and model:
>The main use for it would be for recording audio for fingerstyle and some classical guitar pieces. I've been using a 100 dollars generic classical guitar for recording and studying so basically almost any guitar would turn better. I just want to make the most out of the deal.

2) Is an electric classical guitar worth the price of the electronics? Or should I get only a classical guitar?:
>Another fact is that I don't know if the electronics included in a classical guitar are worth the price. Generally I've been recording with a large diaphragm condenser mic (AT2020) and sometimes with a stereo pair small diaphragm (RODE M5) without much complication. I was thinking that maybe if I recorded with the condenser mic and also with the direct in line it would enhance the sound.

Also, when performing live, do you use only condenser mics or only the direct in line, or both...?


Thanks.
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-Generic classical guitar, no electronics (Medium tension strings)
-Taylor GS Mini-E Walnut (0.13 strings)
Mics: Rode M5, match pair, small diaphragm. Also AT2020, large diaphragm.
PC: Win 8, Netbook, 4GB RAM
DAW: Ableton Live 9 Suite
Interface: TASCAM Us-144 MK II
Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Last edited by Kerbie; 09-05-2018 at 03:40 AM. Reason: Removed details
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  #2  
Old 08-31-2018, 04:54 PM
DownUpDave DownUpDave is offline
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Maybe I misunderstand your question but the guitar being played in the video is a steel string guitar. It would be hard to get his sound with a nylon string instrument.

To answer your question you will get a much truer more natural sound recording with microphones then with a pick up. A Cordoba C9 or C10 is with in your budget, both are all solid woods. You can always have a K&K pick up installed later on if you like. Plug and play does have it's advantages when playing live on stage.
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Taylor 512e 12 fret,
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  #3  
Old 08-31-2018, 07:16 PM
lacatedral lacatedral is offline
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Oh Cordoba, always heard good reviews about them from people. I swear I thought it was an electric classical guitar as Igor sometimes use them... I also showed the video to one of my teachers and told me it was an acoustic, I denied it to him that time, lol.

I'm not saying I'll be recording only with direct in or only with microphones, I was thinking in using both at the same time. Adam Rafferty uses both, mostly condenser mics but some sound comes from direct in line. So does Sungha Jung I think.
Also, when one is playing live, should one use micorphones or the direct in line?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
Maybe I misunderstand your question but the guitar being played in the video is a steel string guitar. It would be hard to get his sound with a nylon string instrument.

To answer your question you will get a much truer more natural sound recording with microphones then with a pick up. A Cordoba C9 or C10 is with in your budget, both are all solid woods. You can always have a K&K pick up installed later on if you like. Plug and play does have it's advantages when playing live on stage.
__________________

-Generic classical guitar, no electronics (Medium tension strings)
-Taylor GS Mini-E Walnut (0.13 strings)
Mics: Rode M5, match pair, small diaphragm. Also AT2020, large diaphragm.
PC: Win 8, Netbook, 4GB RAM
DAW: Ableton Live 9 Suite
Interface: TASCAM Us-144 MK II
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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  #4  
Old 08-31-2018, 07:36 PM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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It's valid to mix in some pick-up signal when recording, if that sounds good to you. But a good microphone will give dramatically better and more natural tone than any pickup system. Performing live, it can be tricky to use mics for guitar in a noisy setting, or playing with others in a group. That is where the pickup option shines.

The video looks like a steel string guitar to me, but there could be a lot of processing involved - EQ, effects, etc. You would have to know more about how that video was recorded to judge accurately.

I don't have a lot of direct experience with Cordoba guitars, but read good things about them consistently. There is a big difference between a GS Mini (1-11/16" / 43 mm nut width, 597 mm / 23.5" scale length) and a classical guitar (2" / 50 mm nut width, 25.6" / 650 mm scale length). And that does not include the major differences between nylon tone and steel string tone, both acoustically and amplified. And I simply do not know what else is available to you in Argentina, or what prices are like versus the US.
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  #5  
Old 09-01-2018, 09:02 AM
lacatedral lacatedral is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl49 View Post
It's valid to mix in some pick-up signal when recording, if that sounds good to you. But a good microphone will give dramatically better and more natural tone than any pickup system. Performing live, it can be tricky to use mics for guitar in a noisy setting, or playing with others in a group. That is where the pickup option shines.

The video looks like a steel string guitar to me, but there could be a lot of processing involved - EQ, effects, etc. You would have to know more about how that video was recorded to judge accurately.

I don't have a lot of direct experience with Cordoba guitars, but read good things about them consistently. There is a big difference between a GS Mini (1-11/16" / 43 mm nut width, 597 mm / 23.5" scale length) and a classical guitar (2" / 50 mm nut width, 25.6" / 650 mm scale length). And that does not include the major differences between nylon tone and steel string tone, both acoustically and amplified. And I simply do not know what else is available to you in Argentina, or what prices are like versus the US.
There's no problem in the size difference, I study with a classical guitar instead not with the taylor
__________________

-Generic classical guitar, no electronics (Medium tension strings)
-Taylor GS Mini-E Walnut (0.13 strings)
Mics: Rode M5, match pair, small diaphragm. Also AT2020, large diaphragm.
PC: Win 8, Netbook, 4GB RAM
DAW: Ableton Live 9 Suite
Interface: TASCAM Us-144 MK II
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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  #6  
Old 09-01-2018, 09:21 AM
rgregg48 rgregg48 is offline
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If you're going to play mostly plugged in, a Godin an multiac might be the answer.
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  #7  
Old 09-01-2018, 11:59 AM
zeboma zeboma is offline
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I have a Córdoba GK Pro Negra that is a fantastic guitar—more of a flamenco than pure classical, but that is good in my case. It can handle all kinds of playing. Highly recommended—and comes with good pickup in it
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  #8  
Old 09-01-2018, 04:35 PM
Jabberwocky Jabberwocky is offline
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If you are going to play amplified most of the time and proper technique is not important to you the Yamaha Silent Guitar SLG200NW is worth a look. A classical teacher will frown on it. For that amped nylon tone it works beautifully but it is bad for learning proper technique.

I like Ibanez and Yamaha classical guitars. Can't go wrong with them.

The Mexican luthiers from Paracho make good classical and flamenco guitars. Francisco Navarro is the most highly rated of them all. This is his student classical guitar http://www.francisconavarro.com/studentclassical.html .

I like Tom Prisloe's Pavan range of guitars. The Pavan TP20 is good value.

Consider buying a used guitar. You can stretch your money and get a better guitar in the bargain.
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  #9  
Old 09-01-2018, 05:39 PM
lacatedral lacatedral is offline
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Proper technique is very important as I'm about to graduate from my major in classical guitar, so it needs to be a guitar proper for studying, playing live and recording.

I'll try Yamaha classical guitar, with electronics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
If you are going to play amplified most of the time and proper technique is not important to you the Yamaha Silent Guitar SLG200NW is worth a look. A classical teacher will frown on it. For that amped nylon tone it works beautifully but it is bad for learning proper technique.

I like Ibanez and Yamaha classical guitars. Can't go wrong with them.

The Mexican luthiers from Paracho make good classical and flamenco guitars. Francisco Navarro is the most highly rated of them all. This is his student classical guitar http://www.francisconavarro.com/studentclassical.html .

I like Tom Prisloe's Pavan range of guitars. The Pavan TP20 is good value.

Consider buying a used guitar. You can stretch your money and get a better guitar in the bargain.
__________________

-Generic classical guitar, no electronics (Medium tension strings)
-Taylor GS Mini-E Walnut (0.13 strings)
Mics: Rode M5, match pair, small diaphragm. Also AT2020, large diaphragm.
PC: Win 8, Netbook, 4GB RAM
DAW: Ableton Live 9 Suite
Interface: TASCAM Us-144 MK II
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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  #10  
Old 09-01-2018, 09:52 PM
Skip Ellis Skip Ellis is offline
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I highly recommend the Cordoba GK Studio. I had the cypress one and I think the 'negra' is even better. Great guitar for a great price.
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  #11  
Old 09-01-2018, 11:08 PM
JohnW63 JohnW63 is offline
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Quote:
but it is bad for learning proper technique.
It would keep your from resting any part of your hand on the top, since it has none.

I really have a great time with mine. More jazz stuff than anything. But, you MUST have an amp to be heard, for the most part. Probably frowned on by hard core music instructors.
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  #12  
Old 09-02-2018, 05:22 AM
Jabberwocky Jabberwocky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnW63 View Post
It would keep your from resting any part of your hand on the top, since it has none.

I really have a great time with mine. More jazz stuff than anything. But, you MUST have an amp to be heard, for the most part. Probably frowned on by hard core music instructors.
It has a pickguard aka finger rest...just as bad for adopting bad technique.
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  #13  
Old 09-03-2018, 05:35 AM
DownUpDave DownUpDave is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lacatedral View Post
Oh Cordoba, always heard good reviews about them from people. I swear I thought it was an electric classical guitar as Igor sometimes use them... I also showed the video to one of my teachers and told me it was an acoustic, I denied it to him that time, lol.

I'm not saying I'll be recording only with direct in or only with microphones, I was thinking in using both at the same time. Adam Rafferty uses both, mostly condenser mics but some sound comes from direct in line. So does Sungha Jung I think.
Also, when one is playing live, should one use micorphones or the direct in line?
I watched a few of Igors other video where he was playing the same guitar. It is a steel string, there were bridge pins, also look at the nut width, you can also see the radius of the fretwires. He really is a good wonderful player and gets a great sound.
__________________
Taylor 512e 12 fret,
Martin 000-15M,
Eastman E100-LTD, 12 fret
Larrivee L-01
Taylor GS Mini walnut
Cordoba C10 crossover
Cordoba Cadete
Ukuleles....way too many to list
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  #14  
Old 09-03-2018, 11:15 AM
Red_Label Red_Label is offline
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Look for a used Cordoba GK Pro Negra or Takamine TC132SC. I've owned 4 GK Pros and they are my favorite nylon guitars ever. The Fishman electronics on the GK Pros are my favorite pickup/preamp systems bar none. I owned the Takamine many years ago, but it was one of my favorite classical guitars as well. The Yamaha NTX series sounds great plugged-in as well... but doesn't come close to the Cordoba or Takamine unplugged.

If you find a pure acoustic classical that you really like, the K&K Pure Mini pickup is very natural sounding. I put one in my Cordoba F10 flamenco and it sounds great. But of course your tonal/volume options are nil, since it's a passive system.
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  #15  
Old 09-03-2018, 08:19 PM
lacatedral lacatedral is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Label View Post
Look for a used Cordoba GK Pro Negra or Takamine TC132SC. I've owned 4 GK Pros and they are my favorite nylon guitars ever. The Fishman electronics on the GK Pros are my favorite pickup/preamp systems bar none. I owned the Takamine many years ago, but it was one of my favorite classical guitars as well. The Yamaha NTX series sounds great plugged-in as well... but doesn't come close to the Cordoba or Takamine unplugged.

If you find a pure acoustic classical that you really like, the K&K Pure Mini pickup is very natural sounding. I put one in my Cordoba F10 flamenco and it sounds great. But of course your tonal/volume options are nil, since it's a passive system.

Yes honestly I'm that dichotomy. Whether if I should get a classical guitar (no electronics) and the a K&K Pure mini; or if I should get an electric classical guitar... Way too many combinatios possible actually.

Maybe I could get a classical guitar from an argentine luthier (I'm from Argentina) and then get the K&K. Or maybe the tone knob from electric classical guitars is actually necessary...
__________________

-Generic classical guitar, no electronics (Medium tension strings)
-Taylor GS Mini-E Walnut (0.13 strings)
Mics: Rode M5, match pair, small diaphragm. Also AT2020, large diaphragm.
PC: Win 8, Netbook, 4GB RAM
DAW: Ableton Live 9 Suite
Interface: TASCAM Us-144 MK II
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Reply With Quote
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electric classical guitar, fingerstyle, recommendations

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