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  #16  
Old 03-05-2018, 08:58 PM
KarenB KarenB is offline
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Originally Posted by godfreydaniel View Post
I’m a steel string player, and my biggest problem is the extra wear to my index fingernail from all the contact with the wound strings. The Mavala Nail Shield greatly protects the nail from wear. I apply it only to the top 1/8” of my nails making sure to coat the top, the edge and the underside of the nails. I touch up the edge every few days.
I like the idea of using it only to the top 1/8" of my nails. I use my index and middle finger also to play banjo in a frailing style, and that's tough on nails too. I also do that downward stroke with the top of my nail in guitar playing sometimes too. I'm concerned about damage. Think I'll give the mavala nail shield a try.

Can you file it like a normal nail?
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  #17  
Old 03-05-2018, 09:57 PM
godfreydaniel godfreydaniel is offline
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It’s a fairly thin coating if you apply it lightly. I usually just buff it a bit. If I need to shorten my nails, I’ll take it off with nail polish remover, trim, file and buff the nails then reapply the Nail Shield. I do that about once a month.

Last edited by godfreydaniel; 03-05-2018 at 10:12 PM.
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  #18  
Old 03-06-2018, 08:38 AM
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I've been using mavala scientifique nail hardener. it just goes on the tip of the nails. works much better than nothing and is easy to apply but probably nowhere near as effective as acrylic nails.
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  #19  
Old 03-06-2018, 09:29 AM
KarenB KarenB is offline
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Originally Posted by godfreydaniel View Post
It’s a fairly thin coating if you apply it lightly. I usually just buff it a bit. If I need to shorten my nails, I’ll take it off with nail polish remover, trim, file and buff the nails then reapply the Nail Shield. I do that about once a month.
I'd use acetone free nail polish remover. Like just about everything else in life, some people say acetone is safe, and others say no. I'd go with the no.
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When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down, “happy.” They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life. —John Lennon
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  #20  
Old 03-07-2018, 09:30 AM
ameriken ameriken is offline
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Look up Guitar Player nails and Rico nails. A little pricy but they get the job done. I've used Guitar Player nails in the past and they are pretty close to natural feeling.
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  #21  
Old 03-07-2018, 07:55 PM
godfreydaniel godfreydaniel is offline
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Originally Posted by Antaren View Post
I'd use acetone free nail polish remover. Like just about everything else in life, some people say acetone is safe, and others say no. I'd go with the no.
I didn’t know there are safer alternatives. Thanks.
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  #22  
Old 03-09-2018, 07:31 PM
jaybones jaybones is offline
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My problem is that my nails tend to be weak and brittle. When they've gotten too long they'd shatter or split. (talk about pain when the split goes into the nail bed. I can understand why torturers use slivers under the fingernails!)

I started taking vitamin D (hereditary deficiency) and keratin supplements (as part of a hair loss prevention regimen) and now my nails are strong.

There's also a product called Hard as Hooves that gets brushed on. Tried it but never had any luck with it, but that was before I was taking the supplements.

When I first started playing acoustic, I would tap my left fingertips against a hard surface. I'd heard it would stimulate the nails to grow.

But another thing to consider is hydration. I also suffer from dry skin, and use generic Eucerin. Pay special attention to rubbing it into your cuticles.
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  #23  
Old 03-10-2018, 09:59 PM
Rapido Eduwardo Rapido Eduwardo is offline
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Default Rico Nails

Have the same nail problem, especially with my thumb nail. It has not grown enough to notice since this past July (2017). Anyway, I am using RICO Nails and they work fairly well. They sell various sizes to fit all your fingers + thumb. They are attached to your real nail by 'Glue Dots', which I found at Wal Mart. I use the 1/2 " ones in the Red/Green box. They can easily be removed with no side effects. Also there are video's on line that I found to be helpful.
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  #24  
Old 03-22-2018, 01:09 PM
Wimmo Wimmo is offline
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Default Nail Salon Fixed Things Permanently

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Originally Posted by Bob Womack View Post
I do all sorts of work around the house and my work sometimes involved physical labor as well. As I matured my nails became thin and brittle. Keeping a set of nails for any length of time became nigh-on impossible. Of course, with gigging that imposed challenges. Eventually as one important gig approached and my nails began coming apart.

My wife grabbed my by the scruff of my neck, dragged me to her nail salon, and introduced me to her nail tech. I ended up with a two-part acrylic cap applied to my nails that in indistinguishable from my regular nails. Every two weeks or so I go back in and get a "fill-in" behind the area that has grown out. If I break a nail it can be repaired. It's been about twenty years and I still have 'em. If I break one when I work on the car they can be repaired. More HERE.

Bob
I had nearly the same experience. My wife pestered me for a month before I finally worked up the nerve to go with her. The guy at the salon told me they deal with nail problems like this (splitting, ends curling downward, breaking) every day.

20 minutes later all 4 nails were fixed and (in my case) lengthened. Repair lasts as long as it takes grow out. Hardly ever have to sand them either, much less file them, except to control length. The acrylic is far more durable than fingernail tissue.

I'd urge anyone who's dealing with chronic nail issues to give a nail salon a try before giving up on nails altogether. Be sure to get a recommendation, to ensure a clean, quality job.
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  #25  
Old 03-26-2018, 05:53 PM
AgedAngel AgedAngel is offline
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Originally Posted by m-thirty-great View Post
I too keep my nails relatively short. The tips of my nails are about even with the flesh at the tip of my finger. I like the tone and control/feel I get this way, as well as the reduced likelihood of breaking nails.
+1 on that.

I play with extremely short nails. They barely reach the tips of my fingers, and they're filed to match the contour of the fingertip.

Back when I started classical guitar (many, many years ago), there was not so much discussion about nail shape. In fact, as I recall, the nail shape that was taught (or at least inferred) followed my current practice, albeit the "proper" length was somewhat longer than I use now. When I left guitar to concentrate on harp (Medieval and wire-strung technique: using nails still, but on both hands), I shortened my nails, particularly when I got a regular gig and a broken nail would be a major disaster. In fact, it was nail breakage that caused me to give up the long nails and play with my very short nails.

I should mention that, regarding wire-strung harp technique, the current orthodoxy specifies *long* nails, filed slantwise: much the same as I'm seeing in some of the nail discussions about classical guitar. Honestly, I mostly don't care for the sound produced by these harpers, and I shudder to think what their nail-upkeep routine must be.

But I played wire-strung harp with short nails for years and never had much of a problem either with length or with tone.

I don't really feel that, even with my very short nails, I'm having much of a tonal problem with classical guitar. (I accept the fact that others may disagree.) One of the advantages of short nails is that breakage becomes less of a problem. In fact, the only time I really cause damage to my nails is when I'm working the heavy bag: my bag gloves compress the outside (pinky finger) corner of my index fingernail and cause a whitened stress fracture. (I just file off the damaged part.) Another advantage is that I don't have as many problems executing daily tasks...such as the typing I'm doing now. In fact, I can tell when my nails need shortening when I start to feel them impact on the bezel surrounding my "Chiclet-style" keyboard keys.

So maybe I'm wrong, but this nail length appears to work for me.

I mention all of this for the sake of those who, like me, have problems with "tracing paper" and/or hooked nails.

Re acrylic nails: I fear them. Since you've now got something like fiberglass superglued to your nail, if you catch your nail hard on something, I'm afraid you don't get a broken nail: you get the nail torn off the nail bed. I shudder. (If it works for you and you're careful, more power to you.) An additional concern: I have a friend who is a cosmetologist, and acrylic nails not only have to be re-based as the natural nail grows out, but if you're not careful, fungus can start growing between the acrylic and your nail. Nasty stuff. Her recommendation was to pay a lot of attention to the condition of the acrylics, and, to avoid infections, to go so far as to have your own personal set of nail tools that you yourself make sure are clean and sterile. When you go in for acrylic work, you bring your own tools.

Just my paranoid two cents.

AA
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  #26  
Old 09-11-2018, 08:34 PM
Rapido Eduwardo Rapido Eduwardo is offline
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This has been a problem for me since I started about 1 year ago. I am now taking 3 pills/ day of gelatin to help grow nails (this is helping) and I use fake nails on my thumb and index finger since these are my current problem. Bought these from Rico nails on the web. They are held on by glue dots (buy from lots of places, but get mine from Wal Mart). .They hold really well and can be removed easily and reused many many times.
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  #27  
Old 09-12-2018, 05:54 AM
ericj ericj is offline
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Default Alternatives to Long Nails

I'm pretty happy with no nails . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB_NBJbYJZo

I think, prior to 1900, it was pretty common.

I have terrible nails so this approach works for me.

Eric
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  #28  
Old 09-12-2018, 09:06 PM
ceciltguitar ceciltguitar is offline
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Lots of discussion on topic of nails on Delcamp forum:

https://www.classicalguitardelcamp.c...forum.php?f=87

Here are a couple other threads from another part of this forum with a similar but slightly different topic, but includes many responses (including mine) about various products and techniques used for nail care:

http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=452910

http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...90#post5182590

https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/...d.php?t=483110
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  #29  
Old 09-13-2018, 12:46 AM
nightflight nightflight is offline
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I have something called "polygel" applied to my p, i, m and a fingers. It is kind of a cross between gel (which is a bit soft) and acrylic (which is hard). Acrylic nails aren't bad, but they do click on the strings a little... but mainly they don't stay on my nails. And they damage my nails, which are on the thin side any way. My hands are in water a lot which doesn't help, but I can't change that.

The polygel hasn't been out more than a year or two, so not many salons use it. I love it. It stays put and I only have it done once a month. I use a light pink which looks like a natural nail. It does wear a bit, and might not do well with steel strings (I play mostly nylon).

But I'm sold.
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  #30  
Old 09-13-2018, 07:37 AM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgedAngel View Post
Re acrylic nails: I fear them. Since you've now got something like fiberglass superglued to your nail, if you catch your nail hard on something, I'm afraid you don't get a broken nail: you get the nail torn off the nail bed. I shudder. (If it works for you and you're careful, more power to you.) An additional concern: I have a friend who is a cosmetologist, and acrylic nails not only have to be re-based as the natural nail grows out, but if you're not careful, fungus can start growing between the acrylic and your nail. Nasty stuff. Her recommendation was to pay a lot of attention to the condition of the acrylics, and, to avoid infections, to go so far as to have your own personal set of nail tools that you yourself make sure are clean and sterile. When you go in for acrylic work, you bring your own tools.
Just my paranoid two cents.
AA
Be of good cheer! I've never had an acrylic and nail lift off the bed. The worst I've had is having the acrylic shatter when I hit something end on. Ten minutes with the tech and it was fixed. The thing is, the benefits outweigh the liabilities and most casualties can be fixed. Twenty years of acrylic nails and only one infection, and it wasn't the fault of my nail tech. I let them go too long and they lifted and an infection started. You need to find a good tech and stick with him or her.


YMMV


Bob
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