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  #46  
Old 10-01-2023, 08:48 AM
YamaYairi YamaYairi is offline
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Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
Any steam that is introduced that is possible to soften the wood structure enough to straighten it out, is also more than sufficient to pop every glue joint in the neck socket, top, bottom and sides. These will release way before the lignen in sides or tops is soft enough to all ow the wood fibres to be repositioned.

the steam that he is introducing is inconsequential to the job, it is doing nothing, what is making it appear straight again is the forced clamping for a one month period (cold bending), again none of this deals with the core issue, so it will revert back to how it was originally over time again.

His process would possibly work long term on a guitar that had been left strung up in a hot car, not a guitar that over time has succumbed to failure from string tension

Traditional neck resets deal with the core issue, they set the neck in the position the guitar has come to settle in, sometimes a guitar may keep bending over time, but it is rare.
What if you were to add posts from the top to the back on either side of the fretboard tongue as reinforcement? Would that prevent the guitar from reverting to the folded shape without compromising tone?
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  #47  
Old 10-01-2023, 08:45 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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What if you were to add posts from the top to the back on either side of the fretboard tongue as reinforcement? Would that prevent the guitar from reverting to the folded shape without compromising tone?
Interesting, so your referring to something like soundposts as fitted to violins.

Having not done it myself, I can only theorize:

The front of a guitar - forward of the soundhole is typically built solid enough that it does not really IMO contribute to the tone of the guitar, so any bracing or re-stiffening of this area should not affect the tone

Would it stop the need for a neck reset, that is a subjective thing, not all guitars need neck resets for the area forward of the soundboard collapsing, sometimes they are needed as they were set wrong to start with, or the top has collapsed behind the sound hole, the sides have started to twist under load, the back has deformed shape, the bridge has twisted and added extra stress, many reasons cause a guitar to need a neck reset.
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  #48  
Old 10-02-2023, 09:17 AM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
Interesting, so your referring to something like soundposts as fitted to violins.

Having not done it myself, I can only theorize:

The front of a guitar - forward of the soundhole is typically built solid enough that it does not really IMO contribute to the tone of the guitar, so any bracing or re-stiffening of this area should not affect the tone

Would it stop the need for a neck reset, that is a subjective thing, not all guitars need neck resets for the area forward of the soundboard collapsing, sometimes they are needed as they were set wrong to start with, or the top has collapsed behind the sound hole, the sides have started to twist under load, the back has deformed shape, the bridge has twisted and added extra stress, many reasons cause a guitar to need a neck reset.
Or is he trying to describe this?

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  #49  
Old 10-02-2023, 10:20 AM
Fathand Fathand is offline
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Or is he trying to describe this?

Similar principle to banjo co-ordinator rods?
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  #50  
Old 10-02-2023, 05:57 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Or is he trying to describe this?

First time I have seen those, interesting concept, for sure its going to affect the tone, be that good or bad, never had a guitar cross my bench with them fitted
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  #51  
Old 10-02-2023, 08:30 PM
YamaYairi YamaYairi is offline
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Or is he trying to describe this?

No, my idea is to install supports from the top to the back. Either one on either side, under the tongue extension, or just one under the tongue, from top to back, in both cases perpendicular to the top and back. This would be added after a neck reset to prevent it from needing it again. Possibly in conjunction with the technique under discussion, to prevent future movement.
As mirwa says, you'd have to look at the guitar in each case to determine what caused the need for the neck reset; what moved.
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  #52  
Old 10-05-2023, 03:04 AM
Big-E Big-E is offline
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Originally Posted by rollypolly View Post
I think this DIY method could be perfect for old Yamahas or other budget guitars, if it can bring them back to playable condition, itís a win win. Will I do this to my Martins, prolly not.
Totally agree. I steamed my 40 year old Yamaha FG365s nearly 3 years ago. The neck hasn't sprung back and the action is fine with good saddle height. I wouldn't employ the method on my more expensive guitars where traditional reset would be cost effective.
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  #53  
Old 10-05-2023, 07:07 AM
Fathand Fathand is offline
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Totally agree. I steamed my 40 year old Yamaha FG365s nearly 3 years ago. The neck hasn't sprung back and the action is fine with good saddle height. I wouldn't employ the method on my more expensive guitars where traditional reset would be cost effective.
I have a 375S that needs done. Can you describe or point me to your process?
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  #54  
Old 10-05-2023, 07:46 AM
grinningfool grinningfool is offline
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I have a 375S that needs done. Can you describe or point me to your process?
Do a search on YouTube for John Miner steam neck reset. He has several videos showing the process.
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  #55  
Old 10-05-2023, 10:28 AM
Big-E Big-E is offline
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Originally Posted by Fathand View Post
I have a 375S that needs done. Can you describe or point me to your process?
I followed the John Miner procedure on You Tube- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTVzGM1Znv8&t=332s I actually steamed the bouts 2-3 times over a period of 5 weeks which worked for me. Disclaimer-for the untrained person, like me, there is always a chance that things can go wrong so weigh it up before you start.
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  #56  
Old 10-06-2023, 01:35 AM
kizz kizz is offline
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Originally Posted by Big-E View Post
Totally agree. I steamed my 40 year old Yamaha FG365s nearly 3 years ago. The neck hasn't sprung back and the action is fine with good saddle height. I wouldn't employ the method on my more expensive guitars where traditional reset would be cost effective.
Good to hear, then there is one more example of it working in the long run and on some guitars.
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  #57  
Old 10-06-2023, 02:04 PM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
Or is he trying to describe this?

IIRC correctly, the first Baby Taylor's in the 90's had a wooden arch which connected the neck block to the sides, transferring that rotational torque away from the top. No idea how long that lasted. (I could be thinking of another model too like the Big Baby BBT).
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  #58  
Old 10-06-2023, 06:40 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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Totally agree. I steamed my 40 year old Yamaha FG365s nearly 3 years ago. The neck hasn't sprung back and the action is fine with good saddle height. I wouldn't employ the method on my more expensive guitars where traditional reset would be cost effective.
That is good to hear, however I have no idea how it could have possibly worked for you, as they say a broken clock is correct twice a day.
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  #59  
Old 10-07-2023, 12:02 AM
kizz kizz is offline
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That is good to hear, however I have no idea how it could have possibly worked for you, as they say a broken clock is correct twice a day.
They also say that common sense and theoretical knowledge cannot predict a certain outcome in all cases. We all learn new things throughout life.
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  #60  
Old 10-07-2023, 01:29 AM
Big-E Big-E is offline
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Originally Posted by mirwa View Post
That is good to hear, however I have no idea how it could have possibly worked for you, as they say a broken clock is correct twice a day.
I must admit that I was sceptical but it was only going to go one of two ways
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