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  #16  
Old 05-21-2015, 04:30 PM
ewh2 ewh2 is offline
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Incredible work and pictures as per usual Mark.

3.25lbs is incredibly light! I've come across a few nylon strings around that weight but none of them have had truss rods which must add to the mass.

Would it be possible to ask what the height of the bridge on the nylon string crossover is? I'm intrigued whether it is low like a flamenco or a bit higher like a classical.
  #17  
Old 05-22-2015, 06:25 AM
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Incredible work and pictures as per usual Mark.

3.25lbs is incredibly light! I've come across a few nylon strings around that weight but none of them have had truss rods which must add to the mass.

Would it be possible to ask what the height of the bridge on the nylon string crossover is? I'm intrigued whether it is low like a flamenco or a bit higher like a classical.
Thanks ewh2,

Yes, it is very light. Koa and cedar are light to begin with. Also,
I save a lot of weight with the way I do lattice bracing on the back. A couple other places are the light weight tuner pegs and overall it is lightly built.

Since this a nylon crossover meant to fit a steel guitar players sensibilities the strings are set at 1/2 inch off the soundboard. Higher than a flamenco, lower than a classic, typical of a steel string.

Mark
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  #18  
Old 05-22-2015, 05:56 PM
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Man that nylon string guitar is sweet!
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2014 Hatcher Greta 13 fret cutaway in EIR/cedar
2017 Hatcher Josie fan fret mahogany
1973 Sigma GCR7 (OM model) rosewood and spruce
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  #19  
Old 05-23-2015, 07:29 AM
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Man that nylon string guitar is sweet!
Thanks Jon,

I'm working to get a good recording session before I officially put it up for sale.
Should be soon!

Thanks Again!
Mark
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  #20  
Old 05-23-2015, 07:42 AM
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Thanks ewh2,

Yes, it is very light. Koa and cedar are light to begin with. Also,
I save a lot of weight with the way I do lattice bracing on the back. A couple other places are the light weight tuner pegs and overall it is lightly built.

Since this a nylon crossover meant to fit a steel guitar players sensibilities the strings are set at 1/2 inch off the soundboard. Higher than a flamenco, lower than a classic, typical of a steel string.

Mark
Thanks for the info Mark about the bridge and the mass of the guitar. Even after the bracing and the woods, I'm stunned at how light the guitar is. I'm trying to imagine how much lighter the guitar would have been without a truss rod as well.

I've said it before but I'd love to see you make a flamenco guitar one day. I think you'd make a great one!
  #21  
Old 05-24-2015, 03:37 AM
Badcrumble Badcrumble is offline
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Thanks

I wish I could find a way to use this on steel string guitars.

Mark
So do I! I've been wanting to see that headstock on a steel string for a few years, though the solid version is also very good looking
  #22  
Old 05-24-2015, 08:58 AM
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I've said it before but I'd love to see you make a flamenco guitar one day. I think you'd make a great one!
​Thanks for your confidence in me! I am planning to do a flamenco guitar probably sometime next year. I already have the model in mind:



It is taking me some time because of research or let me say I'm trying to understand what is it that makes a great traditional flamenco guitar. What is it that I would have to offer to an instrument that already has so much history and tradition? Part of the problem is I don't come from flamenco guitars, I really need to "get it" before I jump in with both feet and say "Hatcher Guitars now offers a traditional style flamenco guitar" but, when I do I want to have done the hard work and have full confidence in what I'm offering.


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Originally Posted by Badcrumble View Post
So do I! I've been wanting to see that headstock on a steel string for a few years, though the solid version is also very good looking
Thanks Badcrumble,

I've heard someone was making 15 to 1 turn ration banjo pegs maybe those will work? I'm looking

Mark
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  #23  
Old 05-24-2015, 03:38 PM
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3.25 lb. is indeed a very light guitar with both a mahogany neck with a truss rod. Yes, your pegs save perhaps 0.3 lb., but still that is very light!

As a point of reference, I just weighed my cherry/cedar classical guitar (with a Spanish Cedar neck with ebony reinforcement) and it weighs 3.68 lb. It has Rodgers tuners that add about 0.3 lbs. to its weight vs. your ebony pegs and thicker laminated sides (11/64" port orford cedar + cherry) and solid catalpa linings. These design features also likely add a bit of mass.

My lightest guitar is actually my steel string pernambuco L00 that Bruce built for me at 3.64 lb. Given the heavy density of pernambuco, a mahogany neck, truss rod and the weight of Robson tuners, gives me some indication of just how thin he works his box!

Kudos
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  #24  
Old 05-25-2015, 07:20 AM
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Thanks iim7v7IM7,

My personal preference is a very lightweight guitar. I like the physical feedback of a vibrating guitar. I also prefer the feel and surround sound I get from a very active back. Additionally, a very active back lowers the body resonance for a deeper bass.

Many guitar builders go for the much more rigid sides for a variety of reasons and I get that. In fact, I have argued those advantages and build that type of guitar as well. Certainly, that setup does not preclude having a very active back but, again my personal preference is to go for the lightest guitar.

It is not a matter of one being better than the other it is which do you prefer to play?

Thanks Again!
Mark
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  #25  
Old 05-25-2015, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Mark Hatcher View Post
Thanks iim7v7IM7,

My personal preference is a very lightweight guitar. I like the physical feedback of a vibrating guitar. I also prefer the feel and surround sound I get from a very active back. Additionally, a very active back lowers the body resonance for a deeper bass.

Many guitar builders go for the much more rigid sides for a variety of reasons and I get that. In fact, I have argued those advantages and build that type of guitar as well. Certainly, that setup does not preclude having a very active back but, again my personal preference is to go for the lightest guitar.

It is not a matter of one being better than the other it is which do you prefer to play?

Thanks Again!
Mark
iim7v7IM7, I can attest to the merits of Mark's lightweight approach to building. He and I talked a lot about this during the build, because I was very interested in getting the lightest guitar possible. The whole body vibrates when I play Greta, and the bass notes are stunningly low and clear. It is unlike any guitar I've every played before.
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My YouTube Page:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ukejon

2009 Pono koa parlor (NAMM prototype)
2014 Pono N30 DC EIR/Spruce crossover
2014 Hatcher Greta 13 fret cutaway in EIR/cedar
2017 Hatcher Josie fan fret mahogany
1973 Sigma GCR7 (OM model) rosewood and spruce
2014 Rainsong OM1000N2

....and about 5 really nice tenor ukuleles at any given moment
  #26  
Old 05-25-2015, 09:58 AM
Rico59 Rico59 is offline
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I agree with you, Mark, about the advantages of a light build. I like the "organic" quality of an instrument that feels like the whole thing is getting in on the act!

Yes, they require a bit more looking after, but it's worth it to me.
  #27  
Old 05-25-2015, 02:38 PM
ewh2 ewh2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Mark Hatcher View Post
​Thanks for your confidence in me! I am planning to do a flamenco guitar probably sometime next year. I already have the model in mind:



It is taking me some time because of research or let me say I'm trying to understand what is it that makes a great traditional flamenco guitar. What is it that I would have to offer to an instrument that already has so much history and tradition? Part of the problem is I don't come from flamenco guitars, I really need to "get it" before I jump in with both feet and say "Hatcher Guitars now offers a traditional style flamenco guitar" but, when I do I want to have done the hard work and have full confidence in what I'm offering.


Mark
Great to hear you are planning to make a flamenco guitar! The drawings for your model in mind seem very interesting indeed. Would I be right be presume the upper bout is smaller than the more standard 11" upper bout of a flamenco guitar?

I can understand why one would require a fair amount of time and consideration towards the flamenco guitar. There is a huge amount of history and tradition (a lot of conservatism) attached to it as well, and in many ways the flamenco guitar is the least evolved of the guitar types. It's a form of the guitar which provides little for the luthier to distinguish themselves from a visual aesthetic but 'under the hood' is where all the magic happens.

The flamenco guitar is a really beautiful form of the guitar and as enthusiast I find it's a shame comparatively few seem to appreciate it.

I consider myself to be reasonably well versed in the world of flamenco and if there are any areas I can provide some info towards I would be delighted to do so.

I eagerly await to see the progress of your flamenco build Mark...
  #28  
Old 05-26-2015, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukejon View Post
iim7v7IM7, I can attest to the merits of Mark's lightweight approach to building. He and I talked a lot about this during the build, because I was very interested in getting the lightest guitar possible. The whole body vibrates when I play Greta, and the bass notes are stunningly low and clear. It is unlike any guitar I've every played before.
Thanks ukejon!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico59 View Post
I agree with you, Mark, about the advantages of a light build. I like the "organic" quality of an instrument that feels like the whole thing is getting in on the act!

Yes, they require a bit more looking after, but it's worth it to me.
Yes, a light build is more sensitive to heat and humidity changes. Western Red Cedar (although more sensitive to rough handling) happens to do better than other top woods with heat and humidity because it doesn't shrink and expand as much. A highly figured Koa back is more susceptible to these changes however, so it would need to be looked after.

Mark
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  #29  
Old 05-26-2015, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewh2 View Post
Great to hear you are planning to make a flamenco guitar! The drawings for your model in mind seem very interesting indeed. Would I be right be presume the upper bout is smaller than the more standard 11" upper bout of a flamenco guitar?

I can understand why one would require a fair amount of time and consideration towards the flamenco guitar. There is a huge amount of history and tradition (a lot of conservatism) attached to it as well, and in many ways the flamenco guitar is the least evolved of the guitar types. It's a form of the guitar which provides little for the luthier to distinguish themselves from a visual aesthetic but 'under the hood' is where all the magic happens.

The flamenco guitar is a really beautiful form of the guitar and as enthusiast I find it's a shame comparatively few seem to appreciate it.

I consider myself to be reasonably well versed in the world of flamenco and if there are any areas I can provide some info towards I would be delighted to do so.

I eagerly await to see the progress of your flamenco build Mark...
Thank you very much for the offer ewh2. I will certainly take you up on that!
I have nothing written in stone on the body profile yet. I agree I may be taking too much liberty on the upper bout design and should probably stay more conservative. You see, this is part of my problem, I need to develop my eye for this. I am confident that I can sculpt the sound for a flamenco but it will take a while before I can properly emulate it's "art".
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  #30  
Old 06-02-2015, 11:58 AM
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Default Florish Style Inlays

I'm going to do abalone flourishes for the fret markers on my spec black ebony parlor. I've been honing my shell cutting skills these past several weeks and have gotten down to cutting abalone lines as thin as .016". Here are a couple pictures of my intended markers:





So far I've cut the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th fret flourishes and am very happy with the results. Tomorrow I'm taking on the 12th!

Thanks for viewing.
Mark
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