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  #1  
Old 01-23-2023, 03:14 PM
michaelm101 michaelm101 is offline
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Default Steel String with Classical Neck & Spacing Features?

Coming from classical guitars as a child, and then a Lemon Grove Taylor Jumbo 12 (1 7/8" nut) after coming back to the guitar, I've grown accustomed to wider necks. I've strung the 12 with 6 strings, but this heavily built guitar doesn't vibrate enough with only 6.

I have a few 1.8s, but they don't feel quite right and stifle my playing.

Are there any steel-stringed guitars that will more closely emulate what I'm familiar "width?"

Thanks in advance!

Last edited by michaelm101; 01-23-2023 at 03:36 PM.
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Old 01-23-2023, 04:05 PM
sdelsolray sdelsolray is offline
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There are some that have 1.875" width at the nut, a higher fingerboard radius (16" or higher), a scale length of 25.6" (650 mm) and a similar body shape (00 and some concert models) that approach a standard classical guitar (2+" at the nut, no fingerboard radius, 650-665 mm scale and various small/medium body shapes).
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Old 01-23-2023, 04:11 PM
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fitness1 fitness1 is offline
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As you search be aware of the fact that part of the equation is the space between the strings...classical gauges are much wider than steel, so for me a 1 7/8 nut on a steel string feels a lot like a 52mm nut on a classical, other than the radiused neck.

Blueridge BR341/361/371 would be something to consider - they are all 1 7/8. The 1.8 guitars you have are slightly less wide than a typical 1 13/16 nut.
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Last edited by fitness1; 01-24-2023 at 05:37 AM.
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Old 01-23-2023, 04:16 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is offline
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There used to be a classical guitarist in Anchorage who played custom made guitars with classical nut widths but steel strings. He had a six string and a twelve string.

As I wrote, his were custom made guitars, and I suspect that youíre going to have to take the same route if you want steel strings with a classical nut width.

Hope this helps.


Wade Hampton Miller
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Old 01-23-2023, 04:18 PM
pagedr pagedr is online now
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The Gibson F-25's made back in the 60s had 2" nuts and flat boards to emulate a classical guitar. They usually aren't too expensive either (speaking in terms of vintage Gibsons here).
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Old 01-23-2023, 05:16 PM
Cri75! Cri75! is offline
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Default Steel String with Classical Neck & Spacing Features?

What about strung a classical guitar with the john pearse folk? They are low tension, so same tension as a sets of regular nylon strings one. The sound is not of a pure steel strings, but it is more steel sounding than nylon sounding.
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Old 01-23-2023, 05:20 PM
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pagedr View Post
The Gibson F-25's made back in the 60s had 2" nuts and flat boards to emulate a classical guitar. They usually aren't too expensive either (speaking in terms of vintage Gibsons here).
Good point - I had forgotten about those.

The ones that Iíve played havenít been the most musically versatile or sonically impressive guitars Iíve ever had my hands on, but itís not as though Iíve played a wide sample of them: Iíve only played two or three.


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Old 01-23-2023, 05:24 PM
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hubcapsc hubcapsc is offline
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My Martin D-28 Authentic 1931 had a v-e-r-y wide neck.

James Taylor talks about his Olson having a real wide neck and
compares it to almost being like a classical...

-Mike
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Old 01-23-2023, 05:50 PM
TRose TRose is offline
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There is an old thread with a list of guitars with wide(1&7/8-48mm) nuts.
Hereís a link:

https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/...d.php?t=186657

Hope this helps.
Best,
Tom
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Old 01-23-2023, 06:54 PM
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blindboyjimi blindboyjimi is offline
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As someone with 2.05Ē classicals to a 1 11/16Ē dreadnaught, Iíd also recommend 1 7/8Ē nut VERY lightly built guitars that require 11-52 strings so the tension difference isnít extreme. My 1964 00-21NY is very similar to my classicals in size, feel, and volume with similar input.

Otherwise , the closest you can get will be going vintage. The original Gibson/Kalamazoo Hawaiian style guitars had flat fretboards and 1 15/16Ē nuts (raised but you can easily lower them). When these are converted to ďSpanishĒ most luthiers will radius the fretboard and intonate the saddle, but very few will file down the neck so many are still 1 15/16Ē although many shops will insist they are 1 7/8Ē to attract steel string players. The downside is that most were built without truss rods and are very thick necks so end up both very thick and very wide and therefore difficult for most people to play.
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Old 01-23-2023, 08:46 PM
Benjo Benjo is offline
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In the seventies Ralph Towner worked with Guild to have them Build him a 12 string with a classical neck width I wonder if that was ever sold in a mainstream model.
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Old 01-25-2023, 01:09 AM
michaelm101 michaelm101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cri75! View Post
What about strung a classical guitar with the john pearse folk? They are low tension, so same tension as a sets of regular nylon strings one. The sound is not of a pure steel strings, but it is more steel sounding than nylon sounding.
I bought some Thomastik Infeld KR116 'Classic S' strings for an experiment, but haven't strung them up on one of my classicals yet. I now have an excuse to get another "experimental" classical... :-)
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Old 01-25-2023, 02:46 AM
joejessal joejessal is offline
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Iíve got a 2008 Huss & Dalton 00-SP with a 1 7/8Ē nut. Itís a 12 fret with a slotted headstock. Has 24.9Ē scale and strung with 12-53 Straight Up Strings. Itís very easy to play. Just a wonderful sound. It must have been a custom order because that models standard spec is different. Gook luck with your search.
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Old 01-25-2023, 03:23 AM
Silly Moustache Silly Moustache is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelm101 View Post
Coming from classical guitars as a child, and then a Lemon Grove Taylor Jumbo 12 (1 7/8" nut) after coming back to the guitar, I've grown accustomed to wider necks. I've strung the 12 with 6 strings, but this heavily built guitar doesn't vibrate enough with only 6.

I have a few 1.8s, but they don't feel quite right and stifle my playing.

Are there any steel-stringed guitars that will more closely emulate what I'm familiar "width?"

Thanks in advance!
Hi, the original Martin 12 fret 0,00, 000 and dreadnought designs had 1.875" nut widths. The dread and the 000 were standard scales - 25.4" and the 00 and smaller 24.9".

I believed that they replicated these with the VS series (Dread was reduced to 1 & 3/4")

Collings replicate these very well albeit with 1.8125" nuts.

For a lesser price but still well built is the Eastman E10/"20-"P" (they mean size "0") and 00, which are very good instruments! but with 1 .8125" nuts.

These are my smaller guitars :

These are my dreads :

Martin have .... finally ... realised the demand for 12 fret 0 and 00 guitars with their 012-28 and 0012-28 - which should be good, 1.3125" nut but the string spacing seems wrong at 2.25"

Hope this helps.
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2023, 03:27 AM
MThomson MThomson is offline
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There's also this one off https://www.taranguitars.co.uk/available if you're looking for something unusual.
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