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  #31  
Old 01-11-2010, 07:23 PM
Taylorplayer Taylorplayer is offline
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While I find many of the above comments encouraging, I have learned to accept one fact: I'm a "prison singer" -- always behind a few bars and looking for the key!
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  #32  
Old 01-11-2010, 07:30 PM
muscmp muscmp is offline
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Originally Posted by rwrrwr View Post
Do you remember what your guitar playing sounded like when you tried your first c chord? Compare that to how you sound now. Singing is the same way. The more you practice the better you'll be. Some have more natural ability but any voice will improve with work. Start slow and use simple songs. Sit up straight and take full breaths to support the air and push from the diaphragm. Start with long notes and concentrate on maintaining pitch and tone. Open the mouth somewhat wide but without stress or over stretching. Also work on scales and arpeggios starting slow to maintain accuracy. Record yourself to help with hearing and fixing errors. Find a teacher and take lessons. You'll sound a lot better in a short period of time.
+1 to all of he said except for the somewhat wide mouth. i would suggest that you form your lips in a rather roundish shape. if you look at the way the great singers sing, they have the roundish shape. i used to think it was just a gestural thing until i tried it. it really helps to form the shape of your words.

also, if you have a harmonica, practice breathing thru it. that will emphasize the diaphragm usage and breathing patterns, and, since the harmonica is very vocal to begin with, it will help you to accentuate certain notes in a positive way. who knows, you, most likely, will become a better singer and, a good harmonica player. harmonicas are cheap.

lastly, use your speaking voice to sing with. don't try to go too high or too low until your speaking voice becomes your singing voice.

good luck to you!
mikeB.
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  #33  
Old 01-12-2010, 03:44 PM
Bevelman Bevelman is offline
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Originally Posted by muscmp View Post
lastly, use your speaking voice to sing with. don't try to go too high or too low until your speaking voice becomes your singing voice.

good luck to you!
mikeB.
Mike,

Interesting point - you mean keep the singing in the same register as the speaking voice to begin with?
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  #34  
Old 01-15-2010, 08:40 PM
ADDNME ADDNME is offline
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I can't even come close to the experience and knowledge of what everyone just said. I don't even know what tone deaf is. But I do know this, you got to believe in your self, every time I don't I come unraveled like a ball of yarn amidst a Siamese cat on catnip. Pick one song and play the *^&% out of it. Play it so much that your sick of it. Keep playing it (singing along with it) even after your sick of it. Listen in your car and sing along. Then go back and keep singing. Then play for some friends, even if itís a year later. I think you will be surprised with their reaction, in a good way. Never give up and don't go quietly!!
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  #35  
Old 01-15-2010, 10:29 PM
ewalling ewalling is offline
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Originally Posted by Billy Memphis View Post
You do need to have some innate musical ability but the foundations of singing can definitely be learned. Some people are tone deaf and have no ear at all so not everyone can be taught however.
I agree. I think if, as you say, you can sing in tune at least for a time when you hit a chord, you can develop that skill. However, as Billy says, there seem to be people who hit a chord, sing discordantly, and have no idea where they are. Maybe it's not impossible for such people to develop singing skills, but I think success is unlikely.

I'm one who is not a natural singer but who has developed a pleasant enough voice. What I have noticed over the years, though, is that however much I may pride myself on guitar technique, people would far rather I sing and play rather than just play. So, unless we are a real virtuoso on the guitar, singing is well worth working on!

Last edited by ewalling; 01-15-2010 at 10:36 PM.
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  #36  
Old 01-16-2010, 11:20 AM
Billy Memphis Billy Memphis is offline
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Pick one song and play the *^&% out of it. Play it so much that your sick of it. Keep playing it (singing along with it) even after your sick of it.
I find that if I practice so much I actually get sick of a song it is better to put it on a shelf for a while and come back when you are refreshed. I do not think you get effective practice if you are tired with the material.
My two cents.
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