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  #16  
Old 10-03-2019, 09:13 AM
thomasinaz thomasinaz is offline
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Originally Posted by eyesore View Post
Hi , another new guitar question. anyone have anything good to say about this guitar? I played one a few weeks ago and it seems like a nice fingerpickers guitar. the price looks pretty decent too. above all... it has a smaller body and it is clear to the 14th fret. All the parlors look cool but I need 14 frets clear of the body.
I have nothing but good things to say about my L-00. It's a 2018 Standard model and sounds great played with a pick. I don't finger pick so can't comment on that aspect of it. Lots of good sound comes out of that little body, it has impressed me so far.
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  #17  
Old 10-03-2019, 09:21 AM
1Charlie 1Charlie is offline
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There is a world of difference between the 12-fret and 14-fret version of the L-00, at least as it pertains to the vintage '30's instruments.

12-fretters have a very "fat" warm tone. Super light, incredibly responsive, not overly punchy. Definitely the preferred fingerstyle guitar of the two. It will respond to the lightest touch. Notes bloom.

14-fretters are sharper, punchier, a wee bit heavier, and a bit louder. A better all-rounder, equally adept at aggressive flatpicking, stumming and fingerstyle. You can really thrash a 14-fret L-00. A great stage guitar that also records well.

It all depends on your playing style and what you are trying to get out of the guitar. I'd find a way to try both at the same time.
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  #18  
Old 10-03-2019, 10:30 AM
rwhitney rwhitney is offline
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Originally Posted by KalamazooGuy View Post
If you can find one from the 30s, it will be the benchmark for all others you will play. They are the definition of balance.
This was my experience with an L-00 from the 1930s. Really nice finger-style guitar.
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  #19  
Old 10-03-2019, 10:54 AM
Larry Mal Larry Mal is offline
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I've been playing mine a lot lately, it's just an all around great guitar. It's good for fingerpicking but it's hardly a one trick pony. Just a good, all around guitar.

It's warm and dark, and has a sweet sound all its own. It's not just a little J-45 or anything, although Gibson advertises it as such. It's got its own voice and would be a great addition to any collection.

Super easy to play, for whatever reason. A total winner.
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  #20  
Old 10-04-2019, 09:08 AM
Psfam Psfam is offline
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Default Maple

I guess the maple sounds more crisp? It isn’t overly bright but comparing it to a different guitar, my Martin CEO Blackwood, it is more fundamental. To me it makes a very nice strumming guitar. I probably prefer the CEO for fingerstyle as I have a pretty light touch. I can imagine someone with a heavier touch plucking the Gibson better than I can.

And since I have now learned to insert pictures...!Doc - Oct 4 2019 - 10-05 AM - p1.jpg

Doc - Oct 4 2019 - 10-06 AM - p1.jpg

I received this in a trade and have replaced the tuners, bridge pins, and saddle. The top is Adirondack.
Not meaning to hijack this thread but I really like this style of guitar and would recommend it. I did get to play a 1938? example that was in amazing condition. I didn’t play them head to head but I agree with other comments, those old ones can be fabulous.
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Last edited by Psfam; 10-04-2019 at 09:17 AM.
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  #21  
Old 10-04-2019, 09:10 AM
J-Doug J-Doug is offline
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Originally Posted by Psfam View Post
I guess the maple sounds more crisp? It isn’t overly bright but comparing it to a different guitar, my Martin CEO Blackwood, it is more fundamental. To me it makes a very nice strumming guitar. I probably prefer the CEO for fingerstyle as I have a pretty light touch. I can imagine someone with a heavier touch plucking the Gibson better than I can.

And since I have now learned to insert pictures...!Attachment 27797

Attachment 27798
AHH a Nick Lucas! Very nice.
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2003 Martin 000-18MC ✩ 2008 Martin 000-28VS ✩ 2012 Gibson J-45 Standard ✩ 2015 Gibson 1928 L-1 Blues Tribute ✩ 2015 Gibson 1932 L-00 Vintage ✩ Fender Acoustic SFX ✩ Baggs ParaDI

My recordings

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  #22  
Old 10-04-2019, 11:52 AM
zombywoof zombywoof is offline
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The early 1930s Advanced L body 12 fretters have certainly become near legendary. When it comes to these guitars though it is hard to make blanket statements regarding sound as you had different hands producing parts for different batches with a part being considered finished when it looked "close enough." Gibson did not even own a router yet. But it could not be the scary light builds alone as for the first couple of years of production the 12 and 14 fret guitars shared this. So I keep coming back to the impact on voice resulting from the fact that unlike Martin which altered the body shape to accommodate 14 fret necks, Gibson opted to leave the body as is and change the bridge location and bracing pattern. So my advice to the OP would be to try and get their hands on both. Plus it would be interesting to hear a comparison between two modern versions.
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  #23  
Old 10-04-2019, 12:25 PM
1Charlie 1Charlie is offline
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Originally Posted by zombywoof View Post
The early 1930s Advanced L body 12 fretters have certainly become near legendary. When it comes to these guitars though it is hard to make blanket statements regarding sound as you had different hands producing parts for different batches with a part being considered finished when it looked "close enough." Gibson did not even own a router yet. But it could not be the scary light builds alone as for the first couple of years of production the 12 and 14 fret guitars shared this. So I keep coming back to the impact on voice resulting from the fact that unlike Martin which altered the body shape to accommodate 14 fret necks, Gibson opted to leave the body as is and change the bridge location and bracing pattern. So my advice to the OP would be to try and get their hands on both. Plus it would be interesting to hear a comparison between two modern versions.
Agreed. Every time I pick up my '31 L-0, I am struck by how light it is. "Scary light" is a perfect description. And, yes, over the years, that has contributed to a healthy little belly behind the bridge.

For a while after acquiring it, I tuned it down a half step out of concern for its long-term health. Then it occurred to me that nearly 90 years, it was about as bellied as it was going to get. And it sounds better at full pitch.

I would love to get my hands on some modern interpretations of the early Gibson flattops to see how they sound.
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  #24  
Old 10-04-2019, 10:29 PM
ndavis1971 ndavis1971 is offline
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Default Gibson L-00

The first two pix below are early 30s ones I just bought and are en route. Very light 12 fret l00s. And I have a 36 l00 in excellent condition with 14 frets as seen in the last pic. Surprisingly loud for their size. They have less overtones, less sustain, and are more woody and punchy, and less lush, than the 00 Martins, which make them great for fingerstyle blues or folk. So I’m a fan you could say...
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  #25  
Old 10-05-2019, 03:48 PM
Bernieman Bernieman is offline
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Originally Posted by Psfam View Post
I guess the maple sounds more crisp? It isn’t overly bright but comparing it to a different guitar, my Martin CEO Blackwood, it is more fundamental. To me it makes a very nice strumming guitar. I probably prefer the CEO for fingerstyle as I have a pretty light touch. I can imagine someone with a heavier touch plucking the Gibson better than I can.

And since I have now learned to insert pictures...!Attachment 27797

Attachment 27798

I received this in a trade and have replaced the tuners, bridge pins, and saddle. The top is Adirondack.
Not meaning to hijack this thread but I really like this style of guitar and would recommend it. I did get to play a 1938? example that was in amazing condition. I didn’t play them head to head but I agree with other comments, those old ones can be fabulous.
That thing of maple being too bright for smaller guitars comes from Andy Powers advertising for his new approach to do (back's)bracings on the redesigned 600 Taylor series a few years ago I think...I've seen (and heard in videos) a Martin 00 with maple back and sides (and other guitars too I think) ; I did not think they sounded too bright either. and I do like the sound of my 614 ce : it would be interesting to know what bracing Gibson used for their back and sides then.
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  #26  
Old 10-05-2019, 04:33 PM
Stringmaster Stringmaster is offline
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My ‘33 elevated board L00 has a rare maple body. It’s a great all-arounder and it’s definitely on the warmer vs bright side sound wise. It’s pretty powerful too for its size. But it’s well broken in ��

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  #27  
Old 10-05-2019, 08:54 PM
eyesore eyesore is offline
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All these "30's'" models you guys are talking about;are they really from the 1930's or are they reproductions? Is this L-00 studio model a 30's job? Also how does the neck at the nut compare to 1 3/4? seems pretty close to that size anyway.
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  #28  
Old 10-06-2019, 05:11 AM
Bernieman Bernieman is offline
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Originally Posted by eyesore View Post
All these "30's'" models you guys are talking about;are they really from the 1930's or are they reproductions? Is this L-00 studio model a 30's job? Also how does the neck at the nut compare to 1 3/4? seems pretty close to that size anyway.
It's usually quite clear in what I read if people talk about originals or re-issues (pay attention).

When it comes to "studio" as used by Gibson, don't forget no-one sees the artist when he is recording : he then needs a good sound, but not all the M.O.P. or Abalone he would possibly want for stage work...Then studio designs guitars with no fancy ornement, no bling, no fancy bindings, no parallelogram fretboard's markers and so on..."Studio" then designs (within Gibson's models names) less expensive models : the L-00 studio I was referring to is a today's L-00 (with walnut b & s). Don't know if they ever existed previously (don't think so)...

Last edited by Bernieman; 10-06-2019 at 08:31 AM.
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  #29  
Old 10-06-2019, 09:33 AM
ruby50 ruby50 is offline
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Default Gibson L-00

When Gibson went to flat tops they did a lot of experimentation. The early or later L-00 body could have 12, 13, or 14 frets, the body switch was 1929. They changed the body shape, moved the soundhole, changed its size, changed scale lengths, changed length of fretboard, changed bridges, added a pick guard, some were ladder braced, H-braced, A-braced, or X-braced. Even the head shape was fluid.

Not to mention the Nick Lucas Specials which had all of the above variations plus an extra deep body.

I bought a broken 1933 L-00 14 fret with an elevated fretboard at a local auction for $41. Just to show how amazing these guitars are, as a rank amateur I patched the sides and top and put on a new back and this guitar is still among the best sounding instruments I have ever heard. But there are still table saw marks on the faces of the braces and glue squeeze out all around.

I have some photos but have never been able to figure out how to post on this platform.

Ed
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  #30  
Old 10-06-2019, 12:48 PM
ndavis1971 ndavis1971 is offline
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Default Gibson L-00

Mine are originals. Get an original. They’re amazing even if “player condition”. See above post. Very true.
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