The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Electric Guitars

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #16  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:15 AM
WildcatGuitar WildcatGuitar is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 14
Smile

I play Parker guitars specifically the Fly guitar. Though the company is out of business theyre available still.
I have two one weighs 5 lb 8 oz, the other 5 lbs 14 oz.
They sound great with 9s (NYXLs)
Thin necks, light weight, unique style/design, very nice guitars.
Just my opinion
Cheers
Im 58 and work with my hands so ease of play and weight issues are solved with these axes.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:24 AM
Nymuso Nymuso is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 472
Default

I have yet to pick up a Tele that I thought was difficult to play.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:25 AM
guitararmy guitararmy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: The Mountain State
Posts: 3,077
Default

A good setup goes a long way to improve playability.
A shorter scale length (like a PRS Santana or Mira X or a Gibson) and lighter strings will reduce string tension.

For me, the setup helps more than the other factors. One of my easiest guitars to play is a Tele.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-17-2018, 04:52 PM
Steel and wood Steel and wood is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,949
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nymuso View Post
I have yet to pick up a Tele that I thought was difficult to play.
Only one Fender Telecaster comes to mind for me. (Great looking relic in my local music shop which I was allowed to take off the wall and play only to find disconcertingly that it had a baseball bat size neck which would have taken some getting used to).
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-17-2018, 10:01 PM
Davis Webb Davis Webb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,930
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DissonantTimbre View Post
Billy Gibbons, Jeff Beck, Page, Iommi, Malmsteen, BB King use(ed) 8s. Hendrix, EVH, James Hetfield, Satriani, Vai, Brian May, Smith/Murray use(d) 9s. If your style is bend heavy there is no need to torture yourself. I can get a good 60s surf sound with 8s. The string gauge effects tone thing is an excuse if you ask me.
Yep.

In fact, in a Daryll's house episode Gibbons said he played 7s for a while.

D.
__________________
Larrivee, Gibson, Ovation, Strat, Tele
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 04-18-2018, 07:08 AM
s2y s2y is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Somewhere middle America
Posts: 4,111
Default

I use 10s and 25.5" scale a lot, but my action is significantly lower than anything you'll find at a guitar shop. I typically play stuff with a 12"+ radius so I can set the action much lower.
__________________
Acoustic gear:
KR fanned 7 string
Greg German DB7
Limited Edition walnut Taylor 12 fret non-cutaway ES2
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 04-18-2018, 04:24 PM
Steel and wood Steel and wood is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,949
Default

I generally like 9's but 10's are okay. (Nothing higher or lower though).
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 04-18-2018, 05:08 PM
1neeto 1neeto is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,080
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DissonantTimbre View Post
Gibsons or anything with a 24.75" scale length are going to be easier to play with 10s than a Fender with a 25.5" scale length will be with 10s. Although you can make a 25.5" easier by going down a gauge in strings. I tend to select the gauge depending of how much bending I want to be doing. Don't be afraid to try out 9s or even 8s.


I cant play anything bigger than 9s on a 25.5 electric. Unless Im tuned to D or lower.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-01-2018, 11:55 PM
jwguitar jwguitar is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 102
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolarrow View Post
For one that has arthritis, is there an electric that is more easy on the hands? Or are most electrics the same?

i am interested in an LP but also considering Strats. I do realize that the set up and string choice make a difference. Mainly asking about the fretboard and frets.

I bought a Gretsch 2420 hollow body 2 months ago and it is not as easy on the hands as I thought it would be.

After 30+ years of strict acoustic playing (strumming chords and finger picking chord shapes) I would like to delve into more lead type playing.

I do plan on trying both of them out later on this week.

Thank you in advance.

CA
I think that if you get it set up with the correct strings any guitar should be easy or at least easier on your hands. I would try to get the neck as flat as possible without buzz and use light guage strings. That might alleviate some of the pain when you play.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-03-2018, 03:13 PM
rokdog49 rokdog49 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 6,724
Default

I'm so used to playing acoustics that using heavier gauge strings on my Tele doesn't bother me at all. I disagree with those who say it doesn't affect your tone. It all depends on how you play, what type of music and how much distortion you use.
Billy Gibbons can get away with 8's because of his rig and the style of music he plays. Stevie Ray Vaughn played very heavy strings and they were integral to his "tone". Ask anyone who tries to copy that tone if it matters.
If you play clean or with just a mild OD, heavier gauge strings will add thickness.
Besides, I figure if I can bend an 11 on an acoustic, I can sure as heck bend one on an electric. YMMV.
__________________
Jamie

_________________
"Everyone move along, nothing to see here."

Pono D 20 Sunburst SS
Martin D18
Gibson J45
Eastman E10 00 Sunburst
Fender Copper Burst Telecaster
The herd is getting thinner.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 05-03-2018, 03:46 PM
roylor4 roylor4 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: McLeansville, NC
Posts: 5,900
Default

As stated by others, there are multiple factors involved. For ME, neck shape and profile are a huge deal. Thicker D shaped necks are my preference. I also prefer Maple necks and fretboard, though I cannot explain why.

While I suppose one could use 7's or 8's, I usually play 10's and find them very easy on the fingers. I have played 9's but they feel too slinky for me. As Steve also mentioned, there are some pretty cool options with a 24" scale in the Fender line.

Tone and aesthetics aside, IMHO - I would find out in this order:

#1 - Neck shape/profile preference
#2 - Scale preference
#3 - How low a gauge strings do you feel are necessary
#4 - GET A SET UP DONE

I cannot speak to how well any gauge below 9's play, as i have never gone that low. I use 10's for standard E and 11's for open G. Yeah, SRV played 13's tuned down a half step but he's, well, SRV.

Set up is super important. Some like VERY low action, but I do a LOT of bending and I find super low action a bit prohibitive in that regard.
__________________
Roy


Ibanez AC240, Alvarez MFA70, RK ROS-10
Gretsch Boxcar, RK RP-06
Vox MV50 AC, Vox BC112, Vox BC108
Roland Cube street EX, Fender Passport Mini, Samson 308i
G&L Tribute Bluesboy, G&L Tribute Ascari GT90

Our website with audio clips - updated 6/7/18

My Solo site - Roy Alderman Music -Updated 6/10/18
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 05-03-2018, 04:47 PM
Bob Womack's Avatar
Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
Guitar Gourmet
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Between Clever and Stupid
Posts: 20,680
Default

As noted, shorter scale, smaller strings, slim neck, and a good setup really help. But here a little mentioned item that makes a BIG difference: jumbo frets. Jumbo frets require a lighter touch or fretting will pull the string sharp. The guitar that has all of these characteristics (except setup, which is aftermarket) is the Gibson Memphis ES-335 DOT with the '60s slim taper neck. Around 2005 the tall frets and slim taper were the standard. They run around $2200 these days.

Bob
__________________
"It is said, 'Go not to the elves for counsel for they will say both no and yes.' "
Frodo Baggins to Gildor Inglorion, The Fellowship of the Ring

THE MUSICIAN'S ROOM

Last edited by Bob Womack; 05-03-2018 at 04:53 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 05-03-2018, 05:17 PM
DukeX DukeX is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,204
Default

I remember reading on a different forum where a lot of players with arthritis and tendonitis preferred guitars with thicker necks. Neck thickness and shape seemed to be a big issue.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 05-04-2018, 06:46 AM
s2y s2y is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Somewhere middle America
Posts: 4,111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DukeX View Post
I remember reading on a different forum where a lot of players with arthritis and tendonitis preferred guitars with thicker necks. Neck thickness and shape seemed to be a big issue.
A lot depends on how people hold the neck. Giant hands aside, guys who prefer the baseball bat neck tend to use thumbover technique and grip the neck very tightly. Loosen the grip and/or use more of a classical neck technique and thin necks can work, although another benefit is that neck shape isn't nearly as critical.
__________________
Acoustic gear:
KR fanned 7 string
Greg German DB7
Limited Edition walnut Taylor 12 fret non-cutaway ES2
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 05-04-2018, 01:57 PM
blakey blakey is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 55
Default

Maybe try a getting a used vintage Gibson Melody Maker or SG Junior. Most play like butter and a have a sweet clean sound. Both light and comfortable and well balanced. Vintage USA fit and finish.
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Electric Guitars

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=