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Old 01-12-2020, 11:01 AM
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TBman TBman is offline
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Default Three way string comparison...

I couldn't take the Thomastik-Infeld John Pearse PJ116 trebles any more
The bass strings are ok so I left them on for now.

Here's the TI bass with Ernie Ball Earthwood trebles (medium tension)
28 32 40


This is the Savarez that shipped with the guitar:


And here are the TI PJ116 John Pearse:


I like the EB trebles best so far. I ordered a set of those ball end watchamacallits so I don't have to wimp out from using other strings
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Old 01-12-2020, 11:23 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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There is a metallic raspiness to your attack that is best hidden, in my opinion, by the Savarez strings. It is most obvious with the Pearse treble strings.

That it is prevalent in all three samples suggests that it isn't the strings, but your technique. I'm sure that isn't a welcome opinion, but it is an honest one. It speaks to the current discussion about a player's ability to influence the tone of an instrument.
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Old 01-12-2020, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
There is a metallic raspiness to your attack that is best hidden, in my opinion, by the Savarez strings.
Yes, no rest strokes. A work in progress.....
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Old 01-12-2020, 11:40 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Free stroke can also be initiated by contact with the string prior to the actual pluck.

If you are playing with nails, also look to smoothing the surface of your nail with fine sandpaper or a fine sharpening stone. It can make a world of difference in tone, as one can easily hear a nick in one's nail or a serrated nail. Shape of nails, as well as where they contact the strings, also shapes tone.

For classical players who play off the right side of their nails, the string should be "captured" between the nail and the flesh of the finger prior to the pluck. That is, the finger/nail is statically in contact with the string prior to plucking. That makes a huge difference in tone, rather than "swatting" the string from a distance to pluck it: doing so provides a crisp, clear sound to each note. That takes practice to "nail it" habitually. Playing lots 'n' lots of scales is the traditional practice for achieving that, starting very slowly and purposefully to get it "just so".

Quality of tone as a result of personal technique is typically a large part of classical guitar playing, typically much more of a pursuit than for many steel string players. I understand that your interest might not be in classical guitar, but, rather, nylon strings. However, nylon strings can tend to make more apparent undesired aspects of technique.

Last edited by charles Tauber; 01-12-2020 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 01-12-2020, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post

That it is prevalent in all three samples suggests that it isn't the strings, but your technique. I'm sure that isn't a welcome opinion, but it is an honest one.
What doesn't kill you, makes you strong. Thanks Charles. I'll work on it.

I can send you the pdf of the demo in case you would like to demonstrate how its supposed to be done. I could use an example of a tone to strive for and something simple like my demo might be good.
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There's always something new to learn, to listen to, to aspire to. It's one of the best things about playing guitar. To be able to create, to be inspired, to make something new that has never been heard before.

Avalon L2-320C Gibson J45, Guild D-120, Larrivee OM-05 and Martin D-16GT

Last edited by TBman; 01-12-2020 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 01-12-2020, 07:24 PM
TRose TRose is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Free stroke can also be initiated by contact with the string prior to the actual pluck.

If you are playing with nails, also look to smoothing the surface of your nail with fine sandpaper or a fine sharpening stone. It can make a world of difference in tone, as one can easily hear a nick in one's nail or a serrated nail. Shape of nails, as well as where they contact the strings, also shapes tone.

For classical players who play off the right side of their nails, the string should be "captured" between the nail and the flesh of the finger prior to the pluck. That is, the finger/nail is statically in contact with the string prior to plucking. That makes a huge difference in tone, rather than "swatting" the string from a distance to pluck it: doing so provides a crisp, clear sound to each note. That takes practice to "nail it" habitually. Playing lots 'n' lots of scales is the traditional practice for achieving that, starting very slowly and purposefully to get it "just so".

Quality of tone as a result of personal technique is typically a large part of classical guitar playing, typically much more of a pursuit than for many steel string players. I understand that your interest might not be in classical guitar, but, rather, nylon strings. However, nylon strings can tend to make more apparent undesired aspects of technique.


Charles,
Thanks for that response and information. Thatís good stuff.
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Old 01-12-2020, 10:39 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBman View Post
What doesn't kill you, makes you strong. Thanks Charles. I'll work on it.
I don't know this gentleman or his work, but here is a video that shows practical aspects of "planting", plucking with the finger already statically touching the string: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkHiYw3t8_w

This one covers some aspects of technique as well, both planted and not: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3sA7Ulkta8

Quote:
I can send you the pdf of the demo in case you would like to demonstrate how its supposed to be done. I could use an example of a tone to strive for and something simple like my demo might be good.
I'd be happy to take a look at it.

Last edited by charles Tauber; 01-12-2020 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 01-13-2020, 12:36 AM
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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When making a comparison keep the volume the same and don't vary after recording tweaks.

I did not find the tone harsh or sharp. Sounds similar to what you would get with a shorter sustain classical guitar and perhaps more bare finger picking than nails.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
I don't know this gentleman or his work, but here is a video that shows practical aspects of "planting", plucking with the finger already statically touching the string: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkHiYw3t8_w

This one covers some aspects of technique as well, both planted and not: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3sA7Ulkta8



I'd be happy to take a look at it.
Thanks Charles!

PM your email and I'll send it to you.

Just as a side note I play with flesh only.
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Celtic Playlist

Reverbnation

There's always something new to learn, to listen to, to aspire to. It's one of the best things about playing guitar. To be able to create, to be inspired, to make something new that has never been heard before.

Avalon L2-320C Gibson J45, Guild D-120, Larrivee OM-05 and Martin D-16GT
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