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  #16  
Old 02-01-2023, 10:49 AM
H165 H165 is offline
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If you sing with the right (wide brim) hat on, you can hear yourself better.
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  #17  
Old 02-01-2023, 11:11 AM
Ralph124C41 Ralph124C41 is offline
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Originally Posted by Chriscom View Post
Yes, I do open mics and jams pretty often and the stage audio is never like the audience's and sometimes downright inaudible other than the feeling something loud is happening out front. That being said, I can usually hear myself well enough to not lose track of where I am.

Monitors take some finessing too, the last time I played with one at a local open mic venue, it didn't help at all.

Despite all that I don't mean to be a downer, these events are fun!
The first time I played I couldn't hear myself at all and I got "lost" a bit. The next couple times were better, however. The last time it was just me with no other players contributing so maybe that was the problem.
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  #18  
Old 02-02-2023, 08:38 AM
Murphy Slaw Murphy Slaw is offline
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I quit them years ago, but there is usually a "power structure" involved and everybody or somebody wants to be "in charge" of sound and that person usually has no ear...

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  #19  
Old 02-02-2023, 06:41 PM
SongwriterFan SongwriterFan is offline
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The modeling amp should be fine.

Just remember one thing: what you hear on stage is NOT necessarily what the crowd hears.

After doing this for two years, I've finally gotten over not being able to hear myself well at some open mics . . . you just have to trust (hope?) that it sounds great out in the house.

I am fortunate that at the open mic I attend most regularly has a pretty good sound guy, and he has me "dialed in" now, and I sound great on stage. Last month, at one of of the shows there, I didn't sound good at all on stage . . . I think somebody had messed with the EQ on the stage monitor. I was assured I sounded fine in the house. The next week, it was back to normal, with no issues.
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  #20  
Old 02-03-2023, 10:43 PM
The Bard Rocks The Bard Rocks is offline
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I've been to quite a number of OMs and run one a year, at different parts of the US each year and never have a problem hearing myself. Sometimes there are monitors, but not usually. Nor do I plug in. And I don't normally sing or play loudly. Nor do I use a monitor when I play out (Bose L1C then). I've often wondered why as it is a frequent problem for others.
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  #21  
Old 02-04-2023, 03:42 AM
guitaniac guitaniac is offline
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Open mic environments vary widely. At some of them you’ll be able to hear yourself without ANY sound equipment and the most annoying problem will be getting there early enough to get a spot.

I hosted one which became so crazy popular that we’d draw cards, thirty minutes before showtime, to determine the order of choosing time slots. That procedure became a better option than having every open mic dominated by the acts who were willing to arrive ninety minutes early to snag fifteen minutes of prime time with an unusually attentive and/or politely indulgent audience.
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  #22  
Old 02-04-2023, 05:19 AM
EZYPIKINS EZYPIKINS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitaniac View Post
Open mic environments vary widely. At some of them you’ll be able to hear yourself without ANY sound equipment and the most annoying problem will be getting there early enough to get a spot.

I hosted one which became so crazy popular that we’d draw cards, thirty minutes before showtime, to determine the order of choosing time slots. That procedure became a better option than having every open mic dominated by the acts who were willing to arrive ninety minutes early to snag fifteen minutes of prime time with an unusually attentive and/or politely indulgent audience.
I like this guitanic:

Have been to open mic's where regardless of how early you get there. If you're not in the click, you're going on last.
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  #23  
Old 02-04-2023, 08:54 AM
Ralph124C41 Ralph124C41 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EZYPIKINS View Post
I like this guitanic:

Have been to open mic's where regardless of how early you get there. If you're not in the click, you're going on last.
I realize this is getting away a bit from the intent of my post ... but I just want to say I agree totally with you. I've been at a couple of open mics where I came hoping to play my electric bass and the "click" members just about refused to take a break and let me play.

This open mic is a little different as I said, plus I'm somewhat friendly with the main organizer. In fact I may go to an acoustic jam later today but it was so cold last night (-8 degrees F) that I may not go and I hope he and his friends show up as they did last month.
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  #24  
Old 02-04-2023, 09:09 AM
Methos1979 Methos1979 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goat Mick View Post
My experience with open mics, even the ones run by pros who know what they're doing is you can never really hear yourself very good at all. But an open mic is a learning experience and a school for future giggers. Learn to work with the limitations you're given and when you do have an opportunity to perform in ideal conditions you'll be even better.
Oh man, is THIS true! At least for my experience. At first it's a horrible wakeup call the first time you go to an open mic. You've been practicing at home with your perfect sound right in your face and you think you're ready and you go and you can't hear yourself at all. The HORROR!

Then you start to play other open mics and find that it's pretty much the same everywhere to varying degrees and you sort of get used to it. It definitely toughens you up and gets you ready for the less-than-optimal sound situations you'll run into when you start gigging!

I have though many times (although I have yet to actually do it) that I should just bring along my little battery powered Bose S1 Pro, plug my guitar into that and point it directly at me and then take their offered 1/4" cord and plug that into the S1 line out. They get all the signal they need while I get tone I can actually hear! But I usually just suck it up and deal with it.
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  #25  
Old 02-04-2023, 05:43 PM
Ralph124C41 Ralph124C41 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Methos1979 View Post
Oh man, is THIS true! At least for my experience. At first it's a horrible wakeup call the first time you go to an open mic. You've been practicing at home with your perfect sound right in your face and you think you're ready and you go and you can't hear yourself at all. The HORROR!

Then you start to play other open mics and find that it's pretty much the same everywhere to varying degrees and you sort of get used to it. It definitely toughens you up and gets you ready for the less-than-optimal sound situations you'll run into when you start gigging!

I have though many times (although I have yet to actually do it) that I should just bring along my little battery powered Bose S1 Pro, plug my guitar into that and point it directly at me and then take their offered 1/4" cord and plug that into the S1 line out. They get all the signal they need while I get tone I can actually hear! But I usually just suck it up and deal with it.
Is there something cheaper ( a lot cheaper) that I could use to do that? I've looked at monitors ... but they don't connect to the P.a. system. I've looked at some acoustic amps and they don't connect to a p.a. but some have a headphones out that I guess I could use with a converter plug. Any ideas?
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  #26  
Old 02-05-2023, 11:25 AM
Methos1979 Methos1979 is offline
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Originally Posted by Ralph124C41 View Post
Is there something cheaper ( a lot cheaper) that I could use to do that? I've looked at monitors ... but they don't connect to the P.a. system. I've looked at some acoustic amps and they don't connect to a p.a. but some have a headphones out that I guess I could use with a converter plug. Any ideas?
I've seen used Loudbox Mini's for down around $225, give or take, although that was some time ago. Check local sales for stuff like that. Craigslist or Facebook local. That would be a great option.
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  #27  
Old 02-05-2023, 12:09 PM
Hank Linderman Hank Linderman is offline
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Another reason not to bring an amp is it slows things down. A few thoughts:

1. Try wearing 1 earplug, this should help you hear your voice better. Your ears aren't equal so experiment with which ear to plug to see what works best as far as pitch, etc.

2. Practice your song so much you can perform it in your sleep.

3. Volunteer to help do the work of running the open mic, setting up chairs, PA, cleanup afterwards. You might get the opportunity to help upgrade the monitoring experience for the players.

Best...H
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  #28  
Old 02-05-2023, 12:56 PM
guitaniac guitaniac is offline
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FWIW,

The last open mic which I hosted (right up until the pandemic shutdown) was in a busy “casual listening” setting. I used my Fishman SoloAmp as a stage monitor (aimed directly at the acts) and the heavy stuff directed into the room. Using very tight patterned Audix OM7 dynamic mics allowed me to set the stage volume pretty high. When things got busy, however, some of the acts STILL had a hard time hearing themselves with all the crowd noise coming their way. If your venue happens to be equally noisy, having an amp on stage may not be the panacea that you think it will be.

I can remember many occasions, later in the evening, when I’d get on stage to discover that the stage monitor level was WAY too loud for my own taste - and yet I’d get frequent requests to turn the stage sound up (as well as requests from customers, staff and management to turn the house sound down). I sometimes wonder how much of the offending “house” sound was actually stage sound.
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  #29  
Old 02-06-2023, 10:51 AM
Ralph124C41 Ralph124C41 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Linderman View Post
Another reason not to bring an amp is it slows things down. A few thoughts:

1. Try wearing 1 earplug, this should help you hear your voice better. Your ears aren't equal so experiment with which ear to plug to see what works best as far as pitch, etc.

2. Practice your song so much you can perform it in your sleep.

3. Volunteer to help do the work of running the open mic, setting up chairs, PA, cleanup afterwards. You might get the opportunity to help upgrade the monitoring experience for the players.

Best...H
1. I have never heard that before. I'm not a singer and I can hear myself when I try to sing. But it was my guitar playing I wanted to hear.

2. I do that ... but still I get stage shock and lose myself in the middle of a break or fill-in.

3. That I will do as I've become friends with two of the leaders. And I would like to know the setup they use and I may even lend a monitor if I can find something not too expensive.
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  #30  
Old 02-07-2023, 04:42 PM
6L6 6L6 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EZYPIKINS View Post
I like this guitanic:

Have been to open mic's where regardless of how early you get there. If you're not in the click, you're going on last.
You need to come to our weekly Auri's Open Mic at Cameron's Pub & Inn, Half Moon Bay, CA. There's a signup sheet and it always goes in the order of signup.

Every Thursday night, 6PM to 9PM.

Check out "Auri's Open Mic" on Facebook.




Last edited by 6L6; 02-07-2023 at 05:00 PM.
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