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  #61  
Old 06-09-2013, 10:06 AM
maurerfan maurerfan is offline
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Haans .. a question about tone tubes .. which show in the GC pic. In brief, what functions do they perform and what do they add to the sound. I take it that your hybrid Larson x-bracing and top-brace layout et al is designed to work with them such that the sound would be noticeably affected in their absence?
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  #62  
Old 06-10-2013, 06:00 AM
Haans Haans is offline
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Maurer, the originals in Prairie States were to keep the neck block from rotating and I expect they do that in my design too. Not one to speculate much, but there may be a sonic benefit also. I haven't built one without since starting on the Larson style guitars. Really couldn't tell you how they work with the bracing either, since I just use them all the time. The bracing has been slowly modified over time and I suppose that without the tone tubes, might not be quite stout enough, but I have always used a holistic approach to building. Also use them on the Stelle and Holzapfel 12's.
I can say that with the tension placed on the top by the strings, there is that tendency to want to pull the neck and tail blocks toward each other. The extreme scenario is the vision of the top folding into it's own soundhole. Many ladder braced parlors tended to look that way when folks started to put steel strings on them. The combination of the tone tubes and a cylindrical radius to the top on my instruments might help to curb that horrid vision. As far as the tonal quality, it may be reverberation of the tubes, some resonant quality, but thankfully, there is no plasticky or graphitey quality to the sound. It's all wood.
Sorry I can't be more specific than this, but my concern is more for taps and structural whole. Have never been much of a reductionist as far as the individual parts of the instrument...I tend to make small changes to improve tonal response while maintaining integrity.
I've always gone with gut feelings and what seems logical. After all, building instruments is kinda touchy-feely...hope that's not too drively.
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  #63  
Old 06-10-2013, 08:31 AM
maurerfan maurerfan is offline
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Thanks Haans. I'm somewhat familiar with the Larson tube, having almost purchased a vintage chocolate-top Larson OM awhile back that had one right down the center. Also, had some correspondence with Edbuff about his GC6 and he provides enthusiastic testimony about the modified bracing and tube configuration.

Look forward to further pics of your RW GC6 under finish.
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  #64  
Old 06-11-2013, 05:52 AM
Haans Haans is offline
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The problem with those is that a repairperson can't get his/her hands inside the guitar. That's why I decided to use two and splay them out.
I'll be sanding the first coats on the BRW in a few days...
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  #65  
Old 06-11-2013, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haans View Post
Thanks guys!
...[snip]....Shot the first coats on the BRW yesterday and I can say that I have never seen BRW this dark. No dying this one, no filler, nothing but lacquer. Ribs are almost black. I'll get some photos up soon.
Hi Hans,
Great variety in the woods you are showing in this thread. Your white oak guitars are always unique and great looking; that quatered hormigo set seems really rare and special; and that BRW is fantastic.

I was curious about your decision to forego the pore filling on your BRW GC. That instrument is using fantastic materials, and you spend an enormous amount of time and effort on your detail work (like purflings), so obviously the decision is not to save materials or time or effort. As this instrument is for you (or your wife), and the design decisions can all be your personal preference, is the lack of filler for aesthetics, tone, or something else?
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  #66  
Old 06-12-2013, 04:54 AM
Haans Haans is offline
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Thanks Chuck! I have some oak coming that should be astounding. Can't wait to see it!
Paste fillers for BRW are black, and I decided I really didn't need black filler in this set. I wanted (for a change) this set to be flat out natural. I will sand back the first layer of coats nearly back to the wood and that will be the filler. Don't care for the epoxy filler business because of my COPD. I expect the grain will show more in the end, but that's what wood is. Have never cared for those finishes that look like a piece of glass anyway. Better to look like a vintage instrument to me.
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  #67  
Old 06-15-2013, 03:43 AM
Haans Haans is offline
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Some progress on the TAMCO EIR/Red spruce GC.
Sawing the F/B fretslots...herbal tea for breaks.


Quick peek to check alignment...


Larson inlay on P/H...


Also sanded the BRW first coats, scuff sanded the MJ-12 and sanded the parlor.
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  #68  
Old 06-18-2013, 03:53 PM
Haans Haans is offline
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The (Hans) Tree...
The 10/4 board is 100" x 9-1/2 x 13" with about 1" of sapwood. Is about 4 degrees off quarter to get the "comb" figure.



Closer look...



Closer yet...



And finally, the first cut back sets...

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  #69  
Old 06-18-2013, 05:46 PM
maurerfan maurerfan is offline
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Oh myyy .. lovely wood! Love how you finish it, but seeing it unfinished w/ natural coloration makes me wonder how much it would darken if finished natural ...

BTW, check the other Larson thread re: tone tubes ..
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  #70  
Old 06-19-2013, 05:19 AM
Haans Haans is offline
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Maurer, I put mineral spirits on the wood before taking the photos, so that's what it would look like. Not much for natural oak, myself, but that's just me. It makes the figure "pop" when you dye it.
Remember though, this is still rough sawn, not sanded...

Last edited by Haans; 06-19-2013 at 07:22 AM.
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  #71  
Old 06-19-2013, 08:19 AM
maurerfan maurerfan is offline
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Haans, yes, your finishing definitely produces a striking accent to the figure. I just glanced down at the 40 year old oak hardwood floor in my study and saw several planks with very much the same figure .. some darker than others depending on proximity to the heart when cut .. but none close to your results.
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  #72  
Old 06-19-2013, 03:41 PM
Haans Haans is offline
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The yield...
Total of 10 backs and 9-1/2 rib sets.
Some really beautiful sets with ribs to match.



Really exhausting work, tedious, messy, noisy and tense. Anyone that has resawn a large board of hardwood knows what I mean. Will wax the ends, restack tomorrow and clean the shop.
Time for a nap...
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  #73  
Old 06-20-2013, 07:18 AM
Joe Sustaire Joe Sustaire is offline
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Yeah, that looks like some work!
Nice though not having that "tree" clogging up the shop though, eh?
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  #74  
Old 06-20-2013, 12:15 PM
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Steve Kinnaird Steve Kinnaird is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haans View Post
The yield...
Total of 10 backs and 9-1/2 rib sets.
Some really beautiful sets with ribs to match.

Really exhausting work, tedious, messy, noisy and tense. Anyone that has resawn a large board of hardwood knows what I mean. Will wax the ends, restack tomorrow and clean the shop.
Time for a nap...
Hope you aren't coughing up too much dust Hans.
That's some good-looking stuff you have there!

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  #75  
Old 06-20-2013, 02:43 PM
Haans Haans is offline
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Man, my back hurt this morning from shoving that stuff through the bandsaw, Joe!
Good to get it cut and out of the way.
Steve, you know how it goes, no matter what precautions you take (and I have them all), you always suck up some. Better oak than Cocobolo or MOP dust.
Well, first thing, you know is I had to glue one up...





Nice thing about this stuff is that the grain is so fine, so are the pores. It's more like mahogany than oak. Should fill easily.
Tomorrow will run it through the sander and see what it looks like. Will finish cleaning the shop tomorrow and then back to business.
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