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  #16  
Old 04-27-2018, 09:02 AM
redir redir is offline
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I did something very similar and have probably 10 guitars on it so far.

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  #17  
Old 04-28-2018, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Bonneybear View Post
Ok, got it. Thanks, can you share with us the diameter of the wheels most commonly used? You mentioned you had 5 sets. Thanks in advance.
Here are the sizes of the dumb bells I made. The main three are 28mm for the binding, 25mm for the bottom purfling, and 21 for the top purfling. When I use abalone which is a bit shallower I use 24mm and 30mm also. I'll fine tune the diameter with a wrap of binding tape on the dumb bells as needed.
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  #18  
Old 04-28-2018, 04:56 PM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Interesting. Building jigs can be fun. I may try this.
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  #19  
Old 05-29-2019, 10:48 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Originally Posted by redir View Post
I did something very similar and have probably 10 guitars on it so far.

Iíve been hunting for parts and am finding precious little locally to make different sized dumbbells. Yours looks to be adjustable. Are you using locking washers to keep the guide from working loose while the router is running?
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  #20  
Old 05-29-2019, 01:35 PM
redir redir is offline
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I’ve been hunting for parts and am finding precious little locally to make different sized dumbbells. Yours looks to be adjustable. Are you using locking washers to keep the guide from working loose while the router is running?
I have since changed that design to eliminate the dumbell. I was building a couple Ukes and a mandolin and as you can imagine the bodies were two narrow. So now it's just a rounded adjustable block design that works just fine.



There is a threaded insert in the adjustable block and I routed out a slot so it can slide up and down. In this pic you see a dovetail slot but it's actually routed through. It's the only pic I could find but illustrates the point.


This is the old version again but just to show that there is a threaded knob that goes through the back of the board into the threaded insert of the adjustable block to lock it down tight. I think maybe I did add a lock washer to it but it's probably not even necessary.

Last edited by redir; 06-13-2019 at 07:43 AM.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:02 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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@redir, that second picture didn't come through. I like your idea about just rounding off the plywood guide block. Finding components is nearly as difficult as it is justifying buying all the expensive jigs from StewMac and LMI.

That being said, I got something workable put together. I haven't tested it yet though. I went with a 1/4" x 2" tension rod with 1/4" (inner diameter) x 3/8" (out diameter) x 1.4" wide nylon washers. I need to figure out a way for it to stay put in that groove but otherwise everything is aligned. I'm going to try to drill a hole through the guide black to thread a 3" x 3/8" steel sheet metal screw through and into the slot in the tension rod of the dumbbell. If it doesn't work, I've always got more plywood and threaded inserts.



PS: pay no attention to the laminate trimmer I have mounted to it. It's a $30 cheapie from Harbor Freight. I'm on a shoestring budget. The jig cost me less than $20 to make. The router bits cost more.
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:58 PM
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Is a down cut bit important? I see them at Stewmac and LMI but they both have an extension for a bearing and I think that might not work with this design.
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  #23  
Old 06-13-2019, 07:15 AM
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[QUOTE=redir;5713223]I did something very similar and have probably 10 guitars on it so far.
So Redir, it appears that yours has a fixed 'dumbell' and the foot that it mounts to is adjustable - which seems like a more logical design than changing the dumbell for every different cut or setup.
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  #24  
Old 06-13-2019, 07:47 AM
redir redir is offline
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I tried updating that second pic.

I think the advantage of using dumbells that are interchangeable is that you can move along more quickly and perhaps make the the whole jig a lot stiffer which may make it more accurate. But of course you have to have specified depths of binding which for the most part I almost always do but my purfling schemes differ a lot so I like the fine adjustments.

Neil you will want some kind of doughnut though for sure.
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  #25  
Old 06-13-2019, 08:08 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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EDIT: re-read the entire thread and found this post redundant.

Last edited by charles Tauber; 06-13-2019 at 08:38 PM.
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  #26  
Old 06-13-2019, 08:20 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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I see some people use metal flanges for the donut but there are also rounded nylon donuts which seem better but I haven't been able to locate anything like that in my local hardware store. Can something like that be found in the plumbing section? My only other option is to use some sort of oversized flat nylon washer.

BTW, my laminate trimmer is pretty chintzy so that's as far down as it will go. I tried installing a metal flange but my router bit wouldn't extend beyond it. I may have to ask for a new router for Father's Day!
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  #27  
Old 06-13-2019, 08:25 AM
redir redir is offline
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I would love to find a better donut too so if you ever do find one post it. I think a lot of people make them from cutting board material. I'm not really tooled up to do that so I never tried it.
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  #28  
Old 06-13-2019, 08:53 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redir View Post
I would love to find a better donut too so if you ever do find one post it. I think a lot of people make them from cutting board material. I'm not really tooled up to do that so I never tried it.
Sounds like a perfect candidate for 3D printing. My local library offers walk-up 3D printing, limited to size of the machine and an hour's run time. Maybe I'll model one and try printing it.
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  #29  
Old 06-13-2019, 09:43 AM
redir redir is offline
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Sounds like a perfect candidate for 3D printing. My local library offers walk-up 3D printing, limited to size of the machine and an hour's run time. Maybe I'll model one and try printing it.
Brilliant! Indeed a 3d printer would be perfect for such and application.
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  #30  
Old 06-13-2019, 10:09 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Sounds like a perfect candidate for 3D printing. My local library offers walk-up 3D printing, limited to size of the machine and an hour's run time. Maybe I'll model one and try printing it.
That's a good idea, Charles. Our local library offers one as well.

Frankly though, I'm stumped that such a fitting can't be found easily off the shelf at the local Ace Hardware.
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