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  #16  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:06 PM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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I use a Taylor T5 for quiet nighttime practice. Not much acoustic tone and not really the same thing, but it works. Mine wears 53-12 gauge acoustic strings to maintain a similar playing feel, and the truss rod was adjusted accordingly.

A friend whose son was a PhD student in classical guitar performance bought an inexpensive Yamaha classical with a neck that was "good enough" compared to his primary guitar. He filled the Yamaha completely with urethane insulation foam so he could practice in student housing during late evening hours. The guitar became virtually silent except for some string noise, but had a pickup installed and he listened through a Rockman and headphones. He would play and practice up to nine hours a day in addition to classes.

The booth approach is designed to either isolate workers from noisy factories or to isolate certain loud instruments in a recording studio. It would be major overkill for your situation and very, very expensive. You could probably build something decent yourself for far less, given some research and advice. Note: I work full-time as an acoustical engineer designing buildings and performance spaces and have for 36 years, but I usually do not respond to these threads. Even when I give good professional advice, people usually just ignore it and go off with whatever questionable internet research they've come up with anyway.
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  #17  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:06 PM
ataylor ataylor is offline
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If even daytime guitar playing is problematic, I’d suggest getting new neighbors might be the better investment of time and money in the long run. Either you’ve got unrealistically sensitive folks living next to you, paper-thin walls, or both. You shouldn’t have to spend a bunch of money to sound-proof your apartment just so you can play an acoustic guitar without fear of confrontation.
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  #18  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Z View Post
Costa,

stephenT is correct. While those booths certainly will lower the volume a little bit they are not made for this duty and are not very efficient. You need mass/weight to stop a 82 Hz (low E) wave with a length of more than 4 meters from walking through.
It would be much more effektive to built an elevated floor and built brick walls around a small room in the room.

You really should google „studio acoustic“. There are a few communities with well educated people who can help. Get your inspiration from there. This is serious science!
Building a room it will be more expensive. I checked that.
They have other the DV series for Drums and Bass, so this is not good for low frequencies, but for acoustic guitar and voice!?
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  #19  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:15 PM
Costa Costa is offline
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Originally Posted by ataylor View Post
If even daytime guitar playing is problematic, I’d suggest getting new neighbors might be the better investment of time and money in the long run. Either you’ve got unrealistically sensitive folks living next to you, paper-thin walls, or both. You shouldn’t have to spend a bunch of money to sound-proof your apartment just so you can play an acoustic guitar without fear of confrontation.
You got a point but I'm home only at night or late evening (not now because of Covid, but during day I need to work).
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  #20  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:17 PM
Costa Costa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl49 View Post
I use a Taylor T5 for quiet nighttime practice. Not much acoustic tone and not really the same thing, but it works. Mine wears 53-12 gauge acoustic strings to maintain a similar playing feel, and the truss rod was adjusted accordingly.

A friend whose son was a PhD student in classical guitar performance bought an inexpensive Yamaha classical with a neck that was "good enough" compared to his primary guitar. He filled the Yamaha completely with urethane insulation foam so he could practice in student housing during late evening hours. The guitar became virtually silent except for some string noise, but had a pickup installed and he listened through a Rockman and headphones. He would play and practice up to nine hours a day in addition to classes.

The booth approach is designed to either isolate workers from noisy factories or to isolate certain loud instruments in a recording studio. It would be major overkill for your situation and very, very expensive. You could probably build something decent yourself for far less, given some research and advice. Note: I work full-time as an acoustical engineer designing buildings and performance spaces and have for 36 years, but I usually do not respond to these threads. Even when I give good professional advice, people usually just ignore it and go off with whatever questionable internet research they've come up with anyway.
I looked for the Taylor T5 or similar when I bought the electric, but I don't see it an option.
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  #21  
Old 11-27-2020, 02:20 PM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is offline
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The solution that's been around the longest is the WhisperRoom. Expensive and terrible to record in, but they do the job and they come apart so you can take it with you when you move.
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  #22  
Old 11-27-2020, 04:15 PM
Crash-VR Crash-VR is offline
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Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
The solution that's been around the longest is the WhisperRoom. Expensive and terrible to record in, but they do the job and they come apart so you can take it with you when you move.
Why are they terrible to record in?
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  #23  
Old 11-27-2020, 04:33 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Did you check the weight of that room? 889kg... Nearly 2000 lbs.

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  #24  
Old 11-27-2020, 05:36 PM
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Is there an outside wall you can sit about a foot away from and practice more quietly? You'll get the reflected sound back at you and you can lighten up your right hand. This is almost the only way I practice anymore.
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  #25  
Old 11-27-2020, 05:55 PM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash-VR View Post
Why are they terrible to record in?
Because they were originally designed to not let sound out. Which is why, as has been noted, they're heavy. No consideration was given to interior acoustic treatment, which would drive up the cost and weight even more, while eating into the already scant interior space. The makers have since discovered that people want to record at home as well as practice so they've come out with "treated" models, but the treatment isn't very effective.
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  #26  
Old 11-27-2020, 07:48 PM
archerscreek archerscreek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl49 View Post
A friend whose son was a PhD student in classical guitar performance bought an inexpensive Yamaha classical with a neck that was "good enough" compared to his primary guitar. He filled the Yamaha completely with urethane insulation foam so he could practice in student housing during late evening hours. The guitar became virtually silent except for some string noise, but had a pickup installed and he listened through a Rockman and headphones. He would play and practice up to nine hours a day in addition to classes.
.
That sounds like a great idea. I might do that myself. Find a cheap guitar with a neck and string spacing I prefer. Fill the body and pick away. Brilliant!!!
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  #27  
Old 11-28-2020, 03:33 AM
Costa Costa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
The solution that's been around the longest is the WhisperRoom. Expensive and terrible to record in, but they do the job and they come apart so you can take it with you when you move.
I believe this one is similar. I looked for WhisperRoom but they are US based and I am in Europe.
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  #28  
Old 11-28-2020, 11:40 AM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Costa View Post
I believe this one is similar. I looked for WhisperRoom but they are US based and I am in Europe.
I'm sure the idea of a re-purposed meat locker has occurred on at least six of the seven continents.
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  #29  
Old 11-28-2020, 05:01 PM
Psychopasta Psychopasta is offline
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I know you don't like the headphones option, but consider the Boss Waza Air headphones. They are supposed to sound very spacious, and for ~$400 may be the best compromise.
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  #30  
Old 12-02-2020, 08:51 AM
leew3 leew3 is offline
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It seems like for the cost of the quiet room options you might consider renting practice space. This way you could carry in your guitar and amp and wail away with impunity. As an alternative, is there a university nearby that might give you a break on a price to rent a practice room from them. Surely their students aren't using them much right now!

Granted, not the comfort of home, but no tension worried about neighbors while you practice.
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