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  #16  
Old 09-22-2012, 05:19 AM
Retroman1969 Retroman1969 is offline
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Default Putting a strap on a classical?

Huh, that's something that did run through my mind, as well as wondering if it would put pressure from underneath on the elastic nylon strings causing pitch issues.
You're right, things to consider.
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  #17  
Old 09-22-2012, 05:53 AM
dosland dosland is offline
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I think that the way the heel and neck joint works on most standard classical guitars would prevent much of the lateral neck movement that you've suggested - stretching the treble strings and compressing the bass strings. The neck is designed to have lengthwise flex (or maybe that's virtually unavoidable in a traditional, lightly-built guitar), but if there was much of this side to side flex, this would cause some pretty awkward tonal distortions.
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  #18  
Old 09-22-2012, 06:20 AM
Pnewsom Pnewsom is offline
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How about a guitar sling? The kind that hooks into the sound hole. Willie Nelson uses one.
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  #19  
Old 09-23-2012, 08:11 PM
RWG RWG is offline
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Holding a classical guitar flat against your belly will dampen the sound. The classical guitar is held the way it is held in order to get the best sound out of it.
If you are using a bridge pickup and amp then this might not be a concern. Stage performers in a pop or country band often plug in and want to roam around with the rest of the band so they will use a strap. The onstage antics are part of the show. Solo classical artists like David Russell or Ana Vidovic hold the guitar in the manner that allows the best acoustic sound. The back is not dampened. I use a dynarette cushion and find the position very comfortable, but I do not have any back issues.
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  #20  
Old 09-24-2012, 05:21 AM
KenW KenW is offline
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I waffled about it for a spell, but watching the David Starobin videos on youtube did it for me! The guy just looked sooooooo relaxed while he played.

I started with a cheap AllParts screw in at the tail block, then later put really nice ebony end pins in; one at the tail block, the other at the heel cap. Since I am a luthier, I could feasibly mask evidence of endpins with new heel cap and end wedge, but I don't see myself selling this guitar. I use a nice suede strap I had laying around from my electric days. Cool thing about that is the suede can actually be used to smooth out minor nicks in my nails that I sometimes get while playing.

If sitting, one can also just attach one end of the strap to the tail button, set the strap over the right thigh and then under the left leg, similar to what oboists do, and the combination of the strap and the right forearm keeps the guitar secure and the neck up.

Either way is much more comfortable to me than a footstool, and my confidence is much higher with the stability than any of the suction cup devices I've tried in the past.
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  #21  
Old 09-24-2012, 05:07 PM
hesson11 hesson11 is offline
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Good for you, Ken. If you get a chance to shoot any pix, I'm sure we'd all like to see them.

-Bob
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  #22  
Old 09-24-2012, 08:16 PM
KenW KenW is offline
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I'll try to do that, hesson.

Concerning back resonance, there is a thought gaining ground that backs that freely vibrate results in the guitar's sound being more resonant up close, but in the big picture a freely vibrating back actually -robs- the energy of the soundwave's projection. Big splash with little travel. It would be an easy experiment to conduct if a pair of people could get a decent classical guitar into a large room and take turns listening and playing, alternating with the back against the chest and with it off.

There are well respected luthiers that laminate their backs and sides to intentionally make them more rigid, thinking that will force more of the string's energy to the top.
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  #23  
Old 09-25-2012, 09:22 AM
franchelB franchelB is offline
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I've held out out putting a strap button on my Tak a/e classical for the longest time just to keep it "looking" classical. But since I've had a strap button installed, I've been playing it more often...and without any regrets.
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  #24  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:58 AM
defenestrate defenestrate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenW View Post
I'll try to do that, hesson.

Concerning back resonance, there is a thought gaining ground that backs that freely vibrate results in the guitar's sound being more resonant up close, but in the big picture a freely vibrating back actually -robs- the energy of the soundwave's projection. Big splash with little travel. It would be an easy experiment to conduct if a pair of people could get a decent classical guitar into a large room and take turns listening and playing, alternating with the back against the chest and with it off.

There are well respected luthiers that laminate their backs and sides to intentionally make them more rigid, thinking that will force more of the string's energy to the top.
Right. being that sound waves are coordinated variances in pressure when in open air, a back that vibrates heavily will tend to move in approximate unison with the top, which might be good for certain kinds of recording, but much like closing a door in a house, the net volume of air changes far less. at certain frequencies, in certain conditions of humidity and air pressure, this could create certain frequencies that have a synergistic effect and hence a peak in the frequency, but for projection, you want as much air on the outside of the instrument carrying this energy as possible, and the most reliable way to do that is to have a very resonant top constantly pushing and pulling this air, most effectively through the soundhole. (I'm sure you know this, but it may not seem intuitive to folks who feel more vibration in the guitar from the sympathetic resonance of back and sides).
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  #25  
Old 09-30-2012, 10:52 AM
lpa53 lpa53 is offline
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Michael Johnson, a great popular songwriter and performer, has used a classical guitar for his work throughout his career and has always used a strap. And he doesn't play cheap classicals either - his current instrument is a Kohno. Here's his setup:

Kohno classical guitar: “Professional – R” built in 1991
Pickup: Baggs LB-6-X
D.I.: "LR Baggs Para-Acoustic D.I."
Strings: D'Addario LP Composites Normal Tension, with a Savarez Alliance High Tesion (Blue Card) for the third string.

Here are some concert photos on his website.

If you ever get a chance to see him perform, take that chance.
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  #26  
Old 09-30-2012, 06:45 PM
RWG RWG is offline
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Playing with a pickup is not the same as trying to project acoustically. I have attended many solo classical guitar concerts by well known players. They were able to fill the hall acoustically. No pickup. They all kept the back free of their bodies. All backs will vibrate. Some more than others. Some will give back more of that energy than others. Unless you have your belly against it absorbing the energy.
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  #27  
Old 11-11-2012, 08:41 PM
mtdmind mtdmind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pnewsom View Post
How about a guitar sling? The kind that hooks into the sound hole. Willie Nelson uses one.
I have one of those slings. I got it in Mexico and the part that hooks onto the soundhole looks like a little hand.They're ok, but I find that it causes the left hand to support the neck too much.
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  #28  
Old 11-16-2012, 07:54 PM
Guitarer Guitarer is offline
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Never have done this, but when I had back problems I got a flat chair (not one that slopes back like most chairs do) and all pain was gone!
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  #29  
Old 11-16-2012, 08:21 PM
mtdmind mtdmind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarer View Post
Never have done this, but when I had back problems I got a flat chair (not one that slopes back like most chairs do) and all pain was gone!
Ideally an adjustable piano bench like the ones that come with a grand piano are the best. Since I don't have one, I just use and adjustable office chair without the back rest. Works great in getting me into the proper sitting position.
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