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  #1  
Old 06-03-2009, 10:27 AM
james55 james55 is offline
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Question Chords

There are a number of guitar chords I don't know, but are the following actual chords or would I just play the chord in front of the slash:

F/C

F/A

C/E

F/G

Am2/G

Am/F#

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 06-03-2009, 10:35 AM
johnra johnra is offline
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Hi James

F/C means to play an F Chord with C as the bass note of the chord.

What comes first is the chord and what follows the slash is the bass for that chord.

The same for all of them.
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:37 AM
Nutmegger1957 Nutmegger1957 is offline
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Never DID figure how how that works...........lol..........how WOULD you play an Am2 with a G bass? (Functionally speaking, that is).
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:42 AM
james55 james55 is offline
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Originally Posted by Nutmegger1957 View Post
Never DID figure how how that works...........lol..........how WOULD you play an Am2 with a G bass? (Functionally speaking, that is).
I hear you, I guess let the bass guitarist play it!

Thanks johnra.


james
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2009, 10:57 AM
alnico5 alnico5 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutmegger1957 View Post
Never DID figure how how that works...........lol..........how WOULD you play an Am2 with a G bass? (Functionally speaking, that is).

1. Fret an Am chord in 1st position.
2. Lift up your index finger from the B string.
3. Use your little finger to fret the G at the 3rd fret of the low E.

The notes low to high will be G A E A B(2nd) E
I think this is what you mean.
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2009, 11:00 AM
johnra johnra is offline
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I learned these chords while studying piano. On piano it is easy to play any bass you want with the left hand and play the chord with the right. The F chord can be played F A C, or A C F or C F A. I think on guitar, for the most part you would just play the basic chord and let the bass player have at the bass note. But I am just learning/re-learning so on the guitar I am far from knowing what I am doing. There is plenty of experts on here to correct me if I tell you something wrong so I am sure by morning it will all be cool. John
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:11 AM
alnico5 alnico5 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnra View Post
I learned these chords while studying piano. On piano it is easy to play any bass you want with the left hand and play the chord with the right. The F chord can be played F A C, or A C F or C F A. I think on guitar, for the most part you would just play the basic chord and let the bass player have at the bass note. But I am just learning/re-learning so on the guitar I am far from knowing what I am doing. There is plenty of experts on here to correct me if I tell you something wrong so I am sure by morning it will all be cool. John
If I was asked to play an F chord with an A bass I'd make a 4 string non-barred F and let the A string ring as the bass note.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:16 AM
CantPlayaLick CantPlayaLick is offline
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I just started Guitar lessons and I asked this exact question of the Instructor. He told me to play the chord only and that the Bass player palys the other half.

(My Instructor is also my Praise Team music director so we're practicing Praise Team music in m lessons.)

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  #9  
Old 06-03-2009, 11:16 AM
Bryan T Bryan T is offline
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The beauty of the guitar is that you can play these chords in a plethora of ways. Don't feel confined to playing open position chords or having notes on each string.

If you are really interested in chord construction and voicing, then I highly recommend Ted Greene's "Chord Chemisty." It is a lifetime of material and will really open up your guitar playing.

Last edited by Bryan T; 06-03-2009 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:24 AM
missouri.picker missouri.picker is offline
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http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php

If you go to the chord section look to the right, there is a place to show you these type of split chords

regards
Donnell
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:19 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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Those chords are not in standard notation. For example, that Am2/G should be called an Am9/G. The Am/F# has the 6th in it, so it would be better named Am6/F#, which would probably be even better named an F#m7b5 or F# half dim, avoiding the slash chord name. Where are you getting those chord names from?

As for the "Am2/G" (really an Am9) I would play it without the A by barring the first four strings at fret 5 and adding the B on the first string at fret 7. But which fingering you choose depends on what is coming before and after, especially how the bass line is moving.
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Old 06-03-2009, 01:02 PM
james55 james55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
Those chords are not in standard notation. For example, that Am2/G should be called an Am9/G. The Am/F# has the 6th in it, so it would be better named Am6/F#, which would probably be even better named an F#m7b5 or F# half dim, avoiding the slash chord name. Where are you getting those chord names from?

As for the "Am2/G" (really an Am9) I would play it without the A by barring the first four strings at fret 5 and adding the B on the first string at fret 7. But which fingering you choose depends on what is coming before and after, especially how the bass line is moving.
Howard,

The chord names are from the sheet music from our church for God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood.

I don't understand your explanation of why certains chords should be another chord, but it's not a big deal. I will just play what sounds right.
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  #13  
Old 06-03-2009, 01:20 PM
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ljguitar ljguitar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james55 View Post
...I don't understand your explanation of why certains chords should be another chord, but it's not a big deal. I will just play what sounds right.
Hi james...
Debating naming conventions of chords is a never-ending preoccupation of some guitarists. A chord's name or designation is often derived from the key the song is in, and more importantly, the chords which precede and/or follow it.

''Slash chords'' like those you listed are a simple and easy way to denote a bass note different from the root which is important to a chord change/variation.

There is no pure music theory way to analyze from a chord symbol like Am/F# what the exact fingering, number of strings played, or the position of it on the neck are. It would be important to look at the chart in context and see where it is moving from and to...if you know who charted it, it's sometimes helpful to chat with them too.
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  #14  
Old 06-03-2009, 02:56 PM
shawlie shawlie is offline
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The thing about notation, it seems to me, is with these kinds of chords, it makes more sense to use the "slash" notation. Because it's about the bass note. A thing like "D, D/C#, D/C, D/B" could of course be written "D, Dmaj7, D7, D6", but to put those notes anywhere but the bass might not be the sound intended.

To me, it means "it really is just a D chord, but with the bass doing something else". To play an open D, followed by a Dmaj7 on the fifth fret, followed by a D7 on the 10th fret, etc. - not sure if that would be what the writer wanted.

Just my thought on the notation, if you have a bass player, let him play the notes. But you'll probably end up using at least a few slash chords eventually (if you play by yourself, or you'll discover them yourself after a while probably). They're fun and really add to things. Extra non-chord notes on the high strings people do all the time, it works just as nice on the low strings.
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Old 06-03-2009, 03:02 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james55 View Post
Howard,

The chord names are from the sheet music from our church for God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood.

I don't understand your explanation of why certains chords should be another chord, but it's not a big deal. I will just play what sounds right.
They aren't another chord, they are the same chord by a different name. So what's in a name? Well, using the right name avoids confusion, for one. It tells you which notes need to be in the chord and which can be omitted. It also makes more clear what key you are in, which helps you to figure out other stuff like the bass line, or passing chords that you might want to use as embellishments.
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