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  #16  
Old 05-03-2009, 12:57 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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I've never actually seen one of D'Aquisto's bridges. But I read about the idea, and this is my take on it. Solid wood contact from the saddle to the top.

Here's another archtop bridge of mine, from an earlier guitar. My own idea here for lighter weight.



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  #17  
Old 05-04-2009, 01:47 PM
blue-wily-fox blue-wily-fox is offline
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Well....here is my blues baby....Holst Parlor Archtop......sweet



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Old 05-04-2009, 02:28 PM
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Howard and Wily,

In general, how does the round sound hole change the tone of an archtop (as compared to f-holes). I assume it's louder and perhaps more resonant.

Howard - I see you are showing guitars at Healdsburg. I hope I can check out your guitars this year.

Darryl
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Last edited by Livingston; 05-04-2009 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 05-04-2009, 02:48 PM
wierdOne wierdOne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
I've never actually seen one of D'Aquisto's bridges. But I read about the idea, and this is my take on it. Solid wood contact from the saddle to the top.

Here's another archtop bridge of mine, from an earlier guitar. My own idea here for lighter weight.



Tell me about this bridge.... do yo notice any sound/playability difference in this vs. a normal floating bridge?
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  #20  
Old 05-04-2009, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by blue-wily-fox View Post
Well....here is my blues baby....Holst Parlor Archtop......sweet



Wow I hate seeing that guitar. MMMMMMMMMM
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  #21  
Old 05-04-2009, 06:01 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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A lighter weight bridge will yield a quicker, snappier attack. A heavier bridge tends toward more sustain. A solid wood bridge, without the metal posts and thumbscrews, will transfer vibration to the top more efficiently, and not lose some of the bridge's rocking motion due to slop between the saddle and posts (although the up and down motion of the bridge is the primary means of sound transfer).

As far as oval or round holes, the result is more bass and more sustain. What they give up is the percussive attack that is usually desired in an orchestral rhythm guitar. This percussive, quick attack comes in part from the F-holes loosening up the central area of the top. I think the oval hole's bass and sustain give it great potential as a solo instrument, or in an ensemble where percussive chording is not needed.
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Old 05-04-2009, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
I think the oval hole's bass and sustain give it great potential as a solo instrument...
Gosh, imagine if Joe Pass would have played an oval hole archtop.

I love my Taylor 912C (all-time favorite guitar)...and I was very intrigued by Blue Wily Fox's Holst and Howard's oval archtop. Wow, could the oval hole archtop be the ultimate fingerstyle axe??? Hmmm...I definitely feel some GAS coming on.
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Old 05-04-2009, 09:36 PM
blue-wily-fox blue-wily-fox is offline
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You know I think that Archtops have a greater projection than some flattops...especially the 'f' hole versions. I love my guitar, but you have to become a better player to get the better sound out of the archtops. They seem to have a rapid attack and quick decay sound, more percusive, I like using the bridge to rest my hand and palm mute for the blues.....I just love that archtop sound. I wish Gibson and Martin would reissue some of those interesting archtops from the '30's. Howard, I'm also going to be at Healdsburg, so looking forward to seeing all your latest.....Wily
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  #24  
Old 05-05-2009, 05:56 AM
Howard Emerson Howard Emerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue-wily-fox View Post
You know I think that Archtops have a greater projection than some flattops...especially the 'f' hole versions. I love my guitar, but you have to become a better player to get the better sound out of the archtops. They seem to have a rapid attack and quick decay sound, more percusive, I like using the bridge to rest my hand and palm mute for the blues.....I just love that archtop sound. I wish Gibson and Martin would reissue some of those interesting archtops from the '30's. Howard, I'm also going to be at Healdsburg, so looking forward to seeing all your latest.....Wily
Fox,
It's a well known fact that well-made acoustic archtops have much better projection than all flat tops. That's exactly why they were the choice for jazz players starting in the 1920's, when they replaced the tenor banjo as the main rhythm instrument.

As far as Martin and Gibson reissuing their 30's archtops: The Martins were an abject failure, and Gibson can never recreate what they made back then.

In fact their best acoustic archtops were made in the 20's into the early 30's.

By the way I play a 1927 Gibson L-5 as my main bottleneck guitar.

It can be seen and heard here, starting at the 3:45 mark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6Gho...eature=related

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Howard
http://www.howardemerson.com/
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  #25  
Old 05-05-2009, 03:32 PM
coldshot coldshot is offline
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I've been bitten by the archtop bug also and have my eye on a 1952 ES350.
All older Gibson archtops are few and far between in oz.
While it's not an acoustic archtop and has twin P90's it does have a very nice acoustic tone.
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  #26  
Old 05-05-2009, 09:04 PM
Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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I had one of those early 50's ES-350's about 35+ years ago. I put a cutaway in it. Probably not PC by today's standards of preservation, but it came out well. Good guitar, but with a laminated maple top, the tone didn't compare with an acoustic archtop. If you see one with a deeper than usual Venetian style cutaway, that may be the one.
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  #27  
Old 05-06-2009, 06:46 AM
Archbacker Archbacker is offline
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Wildbill,

Look for a solid carved top for the best acoustic sound. No laminate tops, and no presssed tops. There are some nice Gibson acoustic archtops from the 30s and 40s that you might get into for the kind of money you're talking about. The L-48 was Gibby's starter 16" archtop for many years. It doesn't have a lot of bling, but it's a good guitar with a great pedigree. Watch out for laminate tops starting around 1950 though. For a newer guitar, you should be able to find an Eastman in your price range. They are available in f-hole or oval hole versions, and are a great value. You might also look into their archback jumbos, which are a hybrid design with an arched back and a flat top and pin bridge.

Good luck!
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  #28  
Old 05-06-2009, 07:59 AM
Dischord Dischord is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archbacker

Look for a solid carved top for the best acoustic sound.....
After 40 years of playing (flat-tops & solid body electrics), I 'gifted' myself with an archtop. It was unknown territory to me, and I admit I didn't research the complex subject as much as many of you do.

But, when I became aware of the Tacoma archtops (AJF22/28), I was Hell-bent to try one. Of course, actually getting my hands on one wasn't likely to happen, so I resorted to buying online - from eeeeebay.

Fast-forward 16 months - and I'm still in love! All solid spruce/maple (CNC carved), and made in the US of A! And with none of the infamous Tacoma finish gremlins.

Can't offer any comparisons to the classic archtops of old, but I'm happy to have this particular 'voice' as an option to my flat-tops and electrics.

Mark
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  #29  
Old 05-06-2009, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dischord View Post
But, when I became aware of the Tacoma archtops (AJF22/28), I was Hell-bent to try one. Of course, actually getting my hands on one wasn't likely to happen, so I resorted to buying online - from eeeeebay.

Fast-forward 16 months - and I'm still in love! All solid spruce/maple (CNC carved), and made in the US of A!
I've played one of those before. One of the only acoustic archtops that I really liked...granted I haven't ever played any of the classic acoustic archtops. I'd like to get my hands one one someday.

I hadn't realized Tacoma CNC'd the top. I always thought that Taylor's usage of CNC machines would have made for a nice, acoustic archtop story. Somehow, Bob always ignores my advice.

Glad to hear your enjoying your Tacoma.
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  #30  
Old 05-06-2009, 09:07 AM
robkreole robkreole is offline
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Default more archtops

Several years ago I became really fascinated with archtops. I have a few including a Gibson ES-125 from the mid-1960's but this is my favorite archtop - a National Debonaire from 1952. Here is a link with some photos.

http://s553.photobucket.com/albums/j...eole/National/

I snagged this guitar off of ebay, about 10 years ago. When it arrived, I opened the case and was just stunned because the guitar was in (and still is) excellent condition. Not mint condition, but close.

I like the guitar because it is really easy to play, stays in-tune and sounds great. It is perfect to play with the Backyard BBQ Band as we play honky-tonk, blues and western swing. Except for that funny neck joint (why on Earth did they put that plastic piece on there?), the guitar is a real keeper and it gets compliments from players every time I play it. The instrument has a great vibe.

Thanks for the thread everybody.

Rob K.
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