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  #31  
Old 08-13-2018, 05:06 PM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Originally Posted by Silly Moustache View Post
I'm pretty observant of tonal qualities of guitars but I've never had concerns about matching a guitar to my voice, or anybody else for that matter.
I think some people just can't help but get deep in the weeds. I've had plenty of long guitar conversations with some very accomplished and well-known singer/songwriters and never once has any of them ever talked about matching a guitar to their voice.
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along with some electrics, zouks, dulcimers, and banjos.

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  #32  
Old 08-13-2018, 05:13 PM
Goodallboy Goodallboy is offline
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Originally Posted by jim1960 View Post
Buy the guitar that inspires YOU, not the guitar that inspires someone else.
I agree wholeheartedly. I believe the singer songwriters of renown chose the guitar they liked for its tone, and not how well it went with vocals. Thatís a forum/aficionado construct that came much later.

I want the best guitar I can find (finally did) and can afford. My vocals arenít even a consideration in that equation.
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  #33  
Old 08-13-2018, 05:34 PM
jrlecky jrlecky is offline
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I was in a guitar store once and the owner mentioned that Taylor's had some cache early on in live church and worship music because their highs blended really well with the deep baritones of those southern preachers. I don't know if that's true but it made me thinking about matching guitar tones to voice tones. I guess it makes sense sonically.
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  #34  
Old 08-13-2018, 06:34 PM
rodmeister rodmeister is offline
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Research recordings of Dylan, McCartney, Lennon, and others that feature the guitar sound you like, and tally them. If a majority are mahogany or rosewood, that narrows down your choice. If a particular tone inspires you, audition that model guitar.

For instance, Dylan's J-50, James Taylor's J-50, and Donovan's J-45 satisfies my ears, so my choice was easy.
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  #35  
Old 08-13-2018, 06:37 PM
Wistah Wistah is offline
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In fairness, I tend to play quieter guitars when I'm writing songs because I don't want to push vocal volume. Plugged in it don't matter, but acoustic playing or recording quick demos into one mic it matters.
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  #36  
Old 08-13-2018, 06:41 PM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrlecky View Post
I was in a guitar store once and the owner mentioned that Taylor's had some cache early on in live church and worship music because their highs blended really well with the deep baritones of those southern preachers. I don't know if that's true but it made me thinking about matching guitar tones to voice tones. I guess it makes sense sonically.
Sounds like a well-crafted sales pitch. I don't see how it "makes sense sonically." Baritones have used Martins and Gibsons for decades without any problem.
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2023 Iris ND-200 maple/adi
2017 Circle Strings 00 bastogne walnut/sinker redwood
2015 Circle Strings Parlor shedua/western red cedar
2009 Bamburg JSB Signature Baritone macassar ebony/carpathian spruce
2004 Taylor XXX-RS indian rosewood/sitka spruce
1988 Martin D-16 mahogany/sitka spruce

along with some electrics, zouks, dulcimers, and banjos.

YouTube
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  #37  
Old 08-13-2018, 08:25 PM
RussL30 RussL30 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wistah View Post
In fairness, I tend to play quieter guitars when I'm writing songs because I don't want to push vocal volume. Plugged in it don't matter, but acoustic playing or recording quick demos into one mic it matters.
My voice sucks, but I like to try to play and sing when no else is around. I find my LG2 and GS Mini are much easier to sing over than trying to raise my voice to be heard over my dreads.
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  #38  
Old 08-13-2018, 08:48 PM
guitarxan guitarxan is offline
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As others have said itís what suits you personally that is best. Get out and try many different guitars and sing with them as possible. Be patient and enjoy the ride. If you play or plan to play amplified, then try the guitar with a rig close to your setup.

For me, my smaller body acoustics, Martin OM and McPhersen Camrielle, seem to compliment my voice more effectively. When I play with my partner I use my Martin or Ibanez Dred for projection. When I am learning or writing a song I use the easiest guitar to play which is my Ibanez Artwood Dred.

Best of luck to you and happy playing.
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  #39  
Old 08-13-2018, 08:54 PM
PiousDevil PiousDevil is offline
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You owe it to yourself to try an all mahogany guitar of some sort. I own almost all dreadnoughts, but I find my Martin 000-15sm is perfect for singer/songwriter work. It provides a perfect bed for my voice without overpowering it.
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  #40  
Old 08-13-2018, 09:35 PM
jaymarsch jaymarsch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly Moustache View Post
I don't get it.

I've seen similar questions about "which guitar suits my voice" etc.

I don't get it - surely it is whatever guitar you like playing.

I'm pretty observant of tonal qualities of guitars but I've never had concerns about matching a guitar to my voice, or anybody else for that matter.

Would someone explain this concept to me please?


In my experience both guitars and vocals can occupy the same tonal range. Nothing wrong with that but some of us singer songwriters like it when the guitar tone complements our vocals rather than competing with those tonal ranges. No hard and fast rule, just personal preferences. Some can hear it, some canít so for some folks it can make a difference, others not so much.

Nothing wrong with the OP doing some exploring and finding out for himself whether or not it matters for his needs.

Best,
Jayne
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  #41  
Old 08-13-2018, 09:41 PM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymarsch View Post
In my experience both guitars and vocals can occupy the same tonal range.
Can you explain what you mean by this? I've never heard a voice that sounds like a guitar so I'm not quite sure what this means.
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2023 Iris ND-200 maple/adi
2017 Circle Strings 00 bastogne walnut/sinker redwood
2015 Circle Strings Parlor shedua/western red cedar
2009 Bamburg JSB Signature Baritone macassar ebony/carpathian spruce
2004 Taylor XXX-RS indian rosewood/sitka spruce
1988 Martin D-16 mahogany/sitka spruce

along with some electrics, zouks, dulcimers, and banjos.

YouTube
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  #42  
Old 08-13-2018, 10:05 PM
Everton FC Everton FC is offline
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As I read the posts here... For me, I want to find a guitar I can play comfortably, without worry, so I can focus on the singing, the lyrics...

Of the three guitars in my signature, the FG-331 and the AMI, serve this purpose, best. One laminate spruce, the other, cedar. And I strum to fingerpick 65/35.

Go figure!

As my grandmother used to say; "To each, his own".
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  #43  
Old 08-14-2018, 09:25 AM
highvibrational highvibrational is offline
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There are definitely guitars out there that sound great by themselves, but when you pair it with a voice, it's just too much. "Hairy" is a word that I use often. Guitars with a more focused sound tend to work better for me, but I wanted to hear from all you folks that had an opinion. I'm leaning towards the Martin 000-18 or OM-18, but we shall see! Thank you.
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  #44  
Old 08-14-2018, 09:40 AM
songman2 songman2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim1960 View Post
Can you explain what you mean by this? I've never heard a voice that sounds like a guitar so I'm not quite sure what this means.
It's the overtones. The sound of every instrument or voice is determined by the overtones and the attack, sustain and decay times. Two instruments (or instrument and voice) can either fit nicely together because the overtones match and produce a pleasing sound or they can clash. For instance a recording engineer will often EQ the sound of a bassdrum and bassguitar so both have room in the mix and so they do not fight against one another. Same goes for voice and guitar (and this is also highly song-dependent).
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  #45  
Old 08-14-2018, 11:06 AM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by songman2 View Post
It's the overtones. The sound of every instrument or voice is determined by the overtones and the attack, sustain and decay times. Two instruments (or instrument and voice) can either fit nicely together because the overtones match and produce a pleasing sound or they can clash. For instance a recording engineer will often EQ the sound of a bassdrum and bassguitar so both have room in the mix and so they do not fight against one another. Same goes for voice and guitar (and this is also highly song-dependent).
This doesn't make sense to me. Overtones aren't random. How do the overtones between a voice and guitar clash? If you're playing a middle C note on a guitar and you're singing a middle C note, the overtones produced by both are the same. The 2nd harmonic is 2x the fundamental frequency, the 3rd is 3x, and so on. The harmonics are always an integer multiple of the fundamental pitch. One instrument may produce more audible overtones than the other, but the frequencies aren't different.

What makes sense is if someone prefers hearing more of less overtones. In other words, some folks prefer a strong fundamental guitar note and others like to hear more overtones. But I don't see how there's any "clashing" going on unless you're singing off key. This really just comes down to personal tastes and preferences and has nothing to do with matching a guitar to a voice or clashing overtones.

When you talk about EQing and creating space, that has less to do with overtones than with the frequency range each instrument occupies. When too many instruments occupy the same frequency range, mixes can sound muddy. The purpose of creating EQ space isn't so much about clashing as it is in allowing each instrument to be heard without stepping on others that occupy or overlap the same frequency range.
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2023 Iris ND-200 maple/adi
2017 Circle Strings 00 bastogne walnut/sinker redwood
2015 Circle Strings Parlor shedua/western red cedar
2009 Bamburg JSB Signature Baritone macassar ebony/carpathian spruce
2004 Taylor XXX-RS indian rosewood/sitka spruce
1988 Martin D-16 mahogany/sitka spruce

along with some electrics, zouks, dulcimers, and banjos.

YouTube

Last edited by jim1960; 08-14-2018 at 11:27 AM.
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