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  #16  
Old 09-18-2015, 07:23 PM
jaybones jaybones is offline
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As pointed out, the dryness is hightening the streakiness or blotchiness. Oil is recomended, and Stew-Mac sell ebony stain which would also darken and make the appearance more uniform.

I've used this on a really dark rosewood FB and people think its ebony.

As ebony trees become more rare, manufacturers are using woods that they would have passed on before. Most stain the ebony to make a uniform blackness that the market expects, and its possible that Taylor doesn't.
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  #17  
Old 09-18-2015, 10:00 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
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The streaking is fine, I have seen it on a lot of new taylors and quite like the look, far more interesting than plain black

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  #18  
Old 09-18-2015, 10:21 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrocks View Post
I'm surprised a guitar made in June shows this much dryness already.
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Originally Posted by roylor4 View Post
Streaking is not a big (IMHO) deal but it does look exceptionally dry.......
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Originally Posted by Earl49 View Post
The lighting in your photos probably tends make the apparent dryness look worse.
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Originally Posted by fazool View Post
The wood looks a tiny bit dry but its hard to really tell by a picture.
Okay, I'll bite. What does "dry" wood look like? How is it visually distinguishable from "wet" wood?

If it is so easy to determine visually if wood is "dry", why does the woodworking industry spend so much effort on humidity measurement, moisture content calculations and moisture meters? If all they need to do is look at a piece of wood to see that a piece of wood is "dry", why do they waste their time, money and effort on all this stuff?
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  #19  
Old 09-18-2015, 10:31 PM
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fazool fazool is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Okay, I'll bite. What does "dry" wood look like? How is it visually distinguishable from "wet" wood?

If it is so easy to determine visually if wood is "dry", why does the woodworking industry spend so much effort on humidity measurement, moisture content calculations and moisture meters? If all they need to do is look at a piece of wood to see that a piece of wood is "dry", why do they waste their time, money and effort on all this stuff?
Certainly your point is valid Charles but I think we can sometimes see an image of something and deduce its condition based purely on visual cues. We can absolutely look at physical objects/materials and declare them moist or dry.

I think we can look at wet sand on a beach and deduce that it is moist and we can look at sand in a desert and deduce that it is dry. Both, simply from it's appearance.

So, I think we have some inherent ability, based on our knowledge and experiences of seeing something and getting a reasonable indication of condition.

Of course a moisture meter is more accurate or a weight measurement or spectraphotomoetric analysis. Certainly for more accurate assessments we need analysis and measurement, which I am guessing (I have no direct experience at all with it) the industry does with careful instrumentation.

We can put a hygrometer in the desert to measure if its dry but we might not need it.

If I had to characterize the appearance of dryness in general terms, I would think it exhibits bright reflections, a diffused surface finish, dusty fuzzy surface texture, as opposed to dark, smooth appearance that lacks dusty spots.

I absolutely think your point is valid - we can't really know. But we can certainly have an hunch simply from an appearance.
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  #20  
Old 09-19-2015, 05:19 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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Originally Posted by pdx View Post
I'm not 100% sure on the whole story, but Bob bought the outfit that mills the ebony or something along those lines. One in twenty trees produced jet black ebony and the waste was incredible, so now all the ebony gets used, streaks or no streaks.
That's basically the story. I'm not sure of the # of trees involved but there was a lot of waste. It's a great way to conserve some quality ebony.

Glowrocks, it's a valid question you asked. When Taylor first started using streaked ebony 2-3 years ago I really didn't like the look of it. Then the more I saw it the more I liked it.

Congrats on your 312! Play it and enjoy it.
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  #21  
Old 09-19-2015, 05:52 AM
sublro sublro is offline
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I think it's possible that the gold pigment in the ebony expresses sometimes in a more diffuse way like pictured here, and sometimes a more well defined pure streak. This would make it look more cloudy loke it does here. When i pull the picture in close thats what i see, that it's that gold pigment mixing in with the black.

After the very big focus and publicity that taylor has made about beginning to use non pure blace ebony, i doubt their qc would let a truly inferior neck go out of the factory on a 300 series or above guitar. Taylor will get it figured out. Their support staff is great.

by the way, everybody should watch the bob taylor vid about their new approach to ebony. It's quite something. Does it help taylor? Absolutely. Is it also doing the right thing for everybody? You bet. Very smart. I just bought a 324, and the fretboard and bridge are just about jet black. I actually now wish they were striped. Its the new beautiful!

Last edited by sublro; 09-19-2015 at 05:59 AM.
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  #22  
Old 09-19-2015, 07:11 AM
pfflyer55 pfflyer55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrocks View Post
My new Taylor 312 may be a problem child.

It sounds good, but the neck attachment (see my other post) is questionable and I also have a question about the fretboard itself.

I understand that Taylor is now using "streaked" ebony for their fretboards.

My question is, do these photos show what looks like normal streaking to you?

I ask because my initial reaction was, this wood is damaged. It looks dried out and streaky.

I then did my research, and streaked ebony is used, but honestly, none of the guitars I've seen in person or in photos have had this much.

Any thoughts on whether this is normal/typical, or indicative of another problem?

Thanks!

[IMG]taylor-312-sep15-24

taylor-312-sep15-26
Bob Taylor started using Stripped Ebony a couple years ago after witnessing a logging co. purposely wasting Ebony trees in a search to find the perfect black trees. He said they would cut down 5 trees to find one that was pur black. He bought that company and now responsibly harvests Stripped Ebony for his guitars. It was the right thing to do, so oil that fret board and show us pics!
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  #23  
Old 09-19-2015, 08:44 AM
KarGuitar KarGuitar is offline
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Here's the story for those who haven't seen it. It's a good listen. I know somebody up there included the link, but didn't put it so it's viewable in this thread... so here ya go.




PS - Your board looks great! Better than all black.
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  #24  
Old 09-19-2015, 10:11 AM
pieterh pieterh is offline
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Default Taylor Neck/Fretboard Q: Is this normal "streaking" or ??

I like the streaked ebony to be honest and it wouldn't be a deal breaker on a high end guitar that would normally have an even black ebony board.

My wife had a Baby Taylor before she traded for her maple Furch OM and that had a lovely pale streak along the fingerboard - it was kind of like a steak of white chocolate on a block of dark. This was more than 2 years ago, she bought it in 2007 I think...
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  #25  
Old 09-23-2015, 11:26 AM
glowrocks glowrocks is offline
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Thanks for all the great responses!

It's true, the lightness is enhanced in the picture; it does look much darker in person.

Based on all the responses, my only real concern is how dry the neck is ... is there a point where it's "too dry" and oil won't be enough?
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  #26  
Old 09-23-2015, 11:40 AM
Rodger Knox Rodger Knox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrocks View Post
Thanks for all the great responses!

It's true, the lightness is enhanced in the picture; it does look much darker in person.

Based on all the responses, my only real concern is how dry the neck is ... is there a point where it's "too dry" and oil won't be enough?
Do you feel sharp ends on the frets? If you do, the fretboard is probably too dry and needs to be humidified, just like the rest of the guitar (oiling does not humidify). If you don't feel sharp ends on the frets, the fretboard just looks dry, and oil will darken it a little and give it a little shine, if you'd prefer that appearance.
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  #27  
Old 09-23-2015, 11:48 AM
glowrocks glowrocks is offline
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Nope, no sharp ends.

Maybe I misunderstood, I thought it was important to oil the fretboard when it has cracks like this one.

Maybe I just don't have enough experience, but I've never seen cracks this deep before ... which is why I have questions :-)
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  #28  
Old 09-23-2015, 11:56 AM
dneal dneal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl49 View Post
The carbon fiber / epoxy fret board on my Rainsong exhibits NO streaking.
That's because the carbon fiber trees aren't endangered yet, and we can still use the choicest cuts.
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  #29  
Old 09-23-2015, 12:43 PM
drtedtan drtedtan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrocks View Post
Nope, no sharp ends.

Maybe I misunderstood, I thought it was important to oil the fretboard when it has cracks like this one.

Maybe I just don't have enough experience, but I've never seen cracks this deep before ... which is why I have questions :-)
I don't notice any cracks in the picture you posted, only the grain of the wood, so I wouldn't be worried about that.

As for oiling the board, most manufacturers and techs recommend you oil the board with mineral oil or lemon oil (mineral oil with lemon scent) once or twice a year (or less frequently). This will darken the wood and provide a nice satiny sheen, but doesn't humidify the wood. But unless you live in a desert or atop a mountain, you're probably not drying the guitar out too much this time of year - that normally happens in the winter when the furnace comes on and dries the air out in the process of warming things up.
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  #30  
Old 09-23-2015, 01:17 PM
glowrocks glowrocks is offline
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I've heard back from Taylor, and they are in sync with the advice given here.

"I agree that the fret board & truss rod cover look a little dry, but that is easily addressed with some oil- which I’m sure the store could handle; it may be the case that just too little was used in production, but when initially applied it still looked “wet”, which is why it may have got through inspection. Ultimately none of these things are defective"

So when it's all said and done, this one's a keeper!
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