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  #76  
Old 07-09-2013, 09:37 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by BradHall View Post
Nick,
A source for a surprising supply of hardwoods to use in your shop is old pallets. Although many companies re-use them, once broken they are tossed. I used to source a lot of 1" thick oak planks for furniture projects as a young man. Some beautiful stuff under the rough surfaces. One other thing. Please think about making some kind of a guard for the belt and pulley. Old bicycle chain guard? Something to keep your hands and clothing out of the machinery, no matter how humble. Good luck.
Most are SPF but you get the odd one that is hardwood for heavy loads.



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  #77  
Old 07-09-2013, 10:15 PM
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So I routed a test rosette tonight out of walnut. I like it. Turned out well. I feel pretty confident routing into the pie pieces I took 3 days assembling. That's them below. Took forever to glue up.

Then, the piece of white oak in this shot is going to be the head plate. It's got lots of figure and the sap wood to match the back.



Also, I went to the scrap yard today. They have bins and bins full of electric motors. Most were 1/2 to 3/4 HP, so not quite as powerful as I wanted. But perhaps if I dig more next time, I'll find something better. It's also a crap shoot whether the thing will even fire up once it's wired and ready to go. But, they're cheep and they said I could bring it back if it doesn't work and exchange it for another one. I paid 12 dollars for a 1/2 horse dryer motor with mounting hardware. Now I just have to figure out the electronics, wire up the power and on/off switch, and it'll be good to go. After that will be assembling the impeller, housing and cyclone separator.
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Last edited by Viking; 07-09-2013 at 10:37 PM.
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  #78  
Old 07-09-2013, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by BradHall View Post
One other thing. Please think about making some kind of a guard for the belt and pulley. Old bicycle chain guard? Something to keep your hands and clothing out of the machinery, no matter how humble. Good luck.
I have already thought of that. The thing is, the motor and pulleys are on the other side of the machine. The way it is built, I operate it standing to the side opposite the motor and pulleys. I feed the wood and pick it up with out ever being near the moving parts (except for the drum, which now has a dust hood and will afford some minimal protection against being accidentally ingested by this thing *gulp*).

Does everyone still think a guard is in order?
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  #79  
Old 07-09-2013, 10:50 PM
jeff crisp jeff crisp is offline
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A guard can't hurt. Distractions happen and belts sometimes brake. If you can make a sander you can knock up a guard. With the segmented rosette I normally put it together on a peice of thick card using super glue. I then use my circle cutter, cutting almost all the way through and then sand the bottom off.

Jeff
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  #80  
Old 07-09-2013, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jeff crisp View Post
A guard can't hurt. Distractions happen and belts sometimes brake. If you can make a sander you can knock up a guard. With the segmented rosette I normally put it together on a peice of thick card using super glue. I then use my circle cutter, cutting almost all the way through and then sand the bottom off.

Jeff
You're probably right. I'm just being lazy.

I knew there was probably a better way to do what I was trying to do with the rosette.
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  #81  
Old 07-10-2013, 10:53 PM
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Spent tonight trying to joint the oak pieces for the center of the back. Couldn't get a successful candle after an hour and a half. The cedar was so much easier to joint. The last piece of cedar I jointed took me probably 25 minutes. Is hard wood harder to joint? I was close a couple times, but never quite got there. Grrrr.

I'll pick it up tomorrow night.
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  #82  
Old 07-10-2013, 11:53 PM
BradHall BradHall is offline
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What are you using to assure a perfectly straight edge on each piece?
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  #83  
Old 07-11-2013, 12:30 AM
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What are you using to assure a perfectly straight edge on each piece?
I'm planing the pieces with a 10" #4 jack plane on a shooting board and then performing a candle test to determine if I have succeeded. Worked great with the cedar pieces I used for the top. I think I just need to be a bit more patient. I was close a couple of times.
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  #84  
Old 07-11-2013, 04:01 AM
kennyk kennyk is offline
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A longer plane makes things easier in my experience. Normally Hardwoods are easier to join than softwoods. I've got a Clifton No.6 but I want to get a 7 for joining boards.
what glue are you using for joining the boards?
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  #85  
Old 07-11-2013, 06:43 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking View Post
I'm planing the pieces with a 10" #4 jack plane.
Technically, a #4 is considered a "smoothing" plane. As kennyk pointed out, a longer plane will make it a little easier, but it still comes down to subtitles of technique. Just running a longer plane back and forth won't accomplish it either.

Also, use a freshly sharpened blade iron. That'll make a difference.

This kind of work is what separates a quality plane (and setup) from a lesser quality one.
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  #86  
Old 07-11-2013, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyk View Post
what glue are you using for joining the boards?
Titebond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Also, use a freshly sharpened blade iron. That'll make a difference.
I had that thought. It is still sharp from the last time I used it, but I'll put a fresh edge on it and see if that helps.
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  #87  
Old 07-14-2013, 08:55 PM
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So I got the dust collection piece more or less sorted. I decided to forget building my own centrifugal blower and just bought a shop vac. But I did build a cyclonic separator. Should help keep the amount of dust and clogging down on the filer in the shop vac. I had questions about whether or not it would be sufficient for the drum sander, but those turned out to be completely unfounded. No dust flying around while using the sander, at all. It was wonderful.

So I also got the oak pieces jointed and glued up. For that, I'll next have to cut the additional pieces and then joint those. Then I can thickness sand the back.

I also started on routing the rosette channel. I decided to do a test run with the first scrap top I made. I think it will actually turn out well. Had very tight joints between the walnut and the cedar. I'll sand it flush tomorrow and post some pictures of that.

While routing it, I used a plane piece of white paper to protect the face of the plate. Seemed to do a good job. No gouging from the trim router turning the circle.

And, if you hold the channel up to the light, you can see light through the wood. Really thin right there. I think that is the way it's supposed to be, but it was interesting to see it.



And then here it is being glued up. A black granite tile from Lowes is a handy thing to have lying around.



On the real thing, I plan on using an inner white oak piece and an outer white oak piece, to give better boundaries to the inside segmented component. Then, I will add a black, white, black border.
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  #88  
Old 07-15-2013, 08:03 PM
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Sanded the walnut rosette on my test piece flush. Got really good borders between the WRC and the walnut. I feel confident moving forward to my nicer top material.





Those 2 little spots on the bottom look like tearout or something, but they're not. The wood right there is just slightly discolored.
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  #89  
Old 07-16-2013, 07:09 AM
KingCavalier KingCavalier is offline
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Looks great Nick, looking forward to seeing it complete.

Scott
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  #90  
Old 07-16-2013, 10:50 AM
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Default sander

Hi,

is your drum sander reliable concerning the thickness you want?
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