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  #16  
Old 07-23-2019, 11:38 AM
antsdmb antsdmb is offline
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Mark....do you thin out the cocobolo more than some other tonewoods for back and sides given how dense it is? What have you found in your experiences with it?


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  #17  
Old 07-23-2019, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Lonzo View Post
.. making me want to see more of that..

.. wonderful wood, such a nice new and very fitting rosette with similarly nice and tasteful abalone appointments.. very cool !
Doesn't really calm my impatiance and anticipation - but in a nice way
Keep them coming, this is so informative and educating..
Lonzo, we have some beautiful work planned that I look forward to also. If you see anything in the meantime we may be able to work it in!

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Originally Posted by Stevied63 View Post
Exciting to see the progress! The 3 dimensional rosette is a unique feature that is coming out great. You guys are seeing the end work of a lot of thought by Mark on how he would go about doing a rosette of this nature - lots of sketches and experiments preceded this design.

S
Itís not easy to make a new element look right. It canít stands out too much or that will be all you see. If it were say Bloodwood one might think why is that contoured? If it is close to the same color as the top then of course itís shaped, thatís how you build in a contrast. Now the contour has a purpose!

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Originally Posted by Erithon View Post
Very intriguing, Mark. The 3D rosette raises a couple questions:
  • How are you accounting for the added mass on the soundboard? As cool as this looks, I can't imagine you would agree to do it if you felt it would negatively impact tone.
  • How will you join the fingerboard to the rosette? On your builds the end of the fingerboard usually covers the top of the rosette. I bet you have an elegant join all planned out. Maybe something with an elevated fingerboard like the Penelope offers?
Itís easy to keep control of the weight here because the area around the soundhole is typically supported. The additional support we get from the top we can take away from inside.

My plan for where the fretboard crosses the rosette is to simply cut away the rise. I am going to bind the Cocobolo fretboard with Koa. So the Koa rosette will blend right in with the binding.

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Originally Posted by antsdmb View Post
Mark....do you thin out the cocobolo more than some other tonewoods for back and sides given how dense it is? What have you found in your experiences with it?
Mark
Yes, Cocobolo is very heavy and stiff so I do go thinner.

Thanks for all the comments!
Mark
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  #18  
Old 07-23-2019, 07:37 PM
Zandit75 Zandit75 is offline
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Looks fantastic, both front and back.
I'm sure you've already worked it out, and while you're wondering how to fit the braces, I'd be more interested in how you're going to fit the fretboard with that raised rosette!!
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  #19  
Old 07-24-2019, 04:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Zandit75 View Post
Looks fantastic, both front and back.
I'm sure you've already worked it out, and while you're wondering how to fit the braces, I'd be more interested in how you're going to fit the fretboard with that raised rosette!!
Hi Zandit75,

I hear you’re getting snow!

My plan for where the fretboard crosses the rosette is to simply cut away the rise. I am going to bind the Cocobolo fretboard with Koa. So the Koa rosette will blend right in with the binding.

Best,
Mark
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Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 07-24-2019 at 04:35 AM.
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  #20  
Old 07-24-2019, 10:31 AM
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Default Honey, Have you seen my purple yoga mat around?

I use go bars and a radius dish to support and help form my tops and backs when gluing the braces down. This arrangement holds the braces down tight and allows access to clean up glue squeeze out before it sets up. Works great.

Something I needed to work through with the raised rosette was the top won't lay flat in the dish. I needed to raise the whole top a little to accommodate that and I needed to maintain the radius for the top.
A thin layer of dense foam rubber would lay in there nicely and I could easily cut a circle out to put the rosette in. Hmm. A yoga mat would be just the ticket!



All was well in my world as I glued up my first round of braces and started pinning them down with the fiberglass go bars.
In the middle of this it occurred to me I may be in trouble. From time to time one of those go bars roll a little and sometimes they might snap off where they are placed and pop the top. It is usually not an issue, at worst there may be a little dent and a drop of water and a light bulb disappears that. Except now I have a flexible membrane under that top and if one of those pops, it's going to go right through the top! There is no fixing that, that's start over with a new top time! I was too far in to quit.
Let's say I was very, very careful and later went back with some scrap wood in the hopes to block any errant go bars.
All went well and I'm glad I had thought of that nightmare before I lived it!

Thanks for following!
Mark
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  #21  
Old 07-25-2019, 03:31 AM
Loggerenguitars Loggerenguitars is offline
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Originally Posted by Mark Hatcher View Post
The first thing to do on the top is to join the halves:



The Old Redwood top has some great curl and dark streaking:



I needed to thin the top to my target deflection without the rosette installed because once the 3D rosette is in it isn't easily going to go through the thickness sander.

Once that was set it's time to show a mock-up of my intended rosette:





This is a curly Koa rosette with sapwood bordered in abalone with black wood-Maple-black wood purfling.

Now the trick is to fit it flush to the top:



The purfling is set a bit proud and with a little handwork it is brought down flat with the top:



It's great to have sharp quality little tools for little jobs requiring precission:



Here we have it fairly well cleaned up:



And a larger look:



Now the trick is to figure out how to glue the top braces on a top with a raised rosette!

Thanks for following!
Mark
I can't believe my eyes!!!
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  #22  
Old 07-25-2019, 08:28 AM
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I can't believe my eyes!!!
Thanks! I think this one is shaping up nicely!
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  #23  
Old 07-25-2019, 10:21 AM
ross748 ross748 is offline
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Rippled Redwood. Just beautiful Mark.
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  #24  
Old 07-25-2019, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by ross748 View Post
Rippled Redwood. Just beautiful Mark.
That came from a very old billet I was fortunate enough to find. It has a nice ring and I love the dark streaking. I have a sister set to this one going on a larger guitar later this year with The Tree for back and sides.

Thanks for commenting!
Mark
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  #25  
Old 07-29-2019, 11:32 AM
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Default "I'll Never Get A Table Saw!"

I have said for many years that I'll never get a table saw;

"There aren't that many straight lines on a guitar"

"I don't work responsibly enough to have a table saw"

"Table saws injure between 30,000 and 56,000 people a year in the US alone"

"Over 4,000 fingers lost a year"

Then this table saw caught my attention and I ordered it some weeks ago. I got it this past weekend. I just couldn't pass it up and it does address some of my concerns.



This is a Byrnes Table Saw. It is a very little saw. The table is 12" by 10" but, it is not a toy by any means. It is an extremely accurate, precision cutting machine. This little saw weighs 32 lbs and runs with hardly any vibration.

The sliding fence runs on bearings and I got the optional micrometer stop for it;



The micrometer adds extreme fine adjustment. Where you see the number 5 index on the adjuster I am holding, each index line represents one thousandth of an inch.



I also got a sled for it which really helps with accuracy and safety. This picture is me setting the saw up to cut fret slots.
I have a number of specific jobs I'll be using this saw for and am excited to have such a nice little tool to work with!

I should mention that I have no relationship with Byrnes other than I just bought his saw.
This tool is being made in a small shop in Florida by a machinist who does fine modeling work. He designed this tool originally for himself about ten years ago and has been selling these and a few other tools since.

Thanks for viewing!
Mark
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Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 07-29-2019 at 01:15 PM.
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  #26  
Old 07-29-2019, 02:50 PM
jaymarsch jaymarsch is offline
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Well, a luthier who turns out as beautiful guitars as you do sure should have a beautiful and well-machined table saw. Wow - that is one impressive piece of machinery. Almost as impressive as the rippled redwood. And yes, please use it safely and in good health!

Best,
Jayne
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  #27  
Old 07-29-2019, 07:08 PM
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Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
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Originally Posted by jaymarsch View Post
Well, a luthier who turns out as beautiful guitars as you do sure should have a beautiful and well-machined table saw. Wow - that is one impressive piece of machinery. Almost as impressive as the rippled redwood. And yes, please use it safely and in good health!

Best,
Jayne
Thank you Jayne! A quality tool might not directly inspire a new guitar like wood can but, it can inspire new techniques and ideas and can definitely improve ease of play, in the shop that is

Mark
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  #28  
Old 07-30-2019, 09:48 AM
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Default Like Cutting Diamonds

One feature with cutaways that is unique to my guitars is the way I mount the strap button onto a faceted block at the heel. It holds the strap well but, keeps the button recessed out of the way of your fretting hand. It's a little trick I learned back in the day when I made kayaks;



I select a little wedge of wood and glue it into the heel block after the sides are on and before the top and back are glued on. I use a wedge block because it's will hold the threaded strap button more securely.

I usually try to blend it in with the binding on the guitar and since it's unique to my guitars I prefer a little more showy piece if possible. A lot of what shows on a piece of wood can be enhanced by the wood you select, the part you choose to use and, like a diamond, how you cut it. For instance:

This is the piece of Koa selected to make the wedge:



It has a little bit of figure but the Koa binding it nicely flamed. Here is the same piece of wood turned to the next side:



There is a lot of flame on that side. Now when I cut the facet into the wedge to seat the strap button it's faces at a 45 degree angle so in order to have the full on flame I need to face the best flame in that direction so I'll cut the square block wedge blank at a 45 degree angle out of this original piece of wood:



Here is a picture of the edge I will cut the facet into:



The figure will only be more pronounced when the facet is cut and the finish is on.
I know it's a little thing, maybe a little too obsessive for some. I love trying to show woods in the best light I can find so I'll just call it pride in workmanship.

Thanks for following along!
Mark
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  #29  
Old 07-30-2019, 11:19 AM
Lonzo Lonzo is offline
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Default Obsession ?

Hi Mark,
..not that it matters what I say, but if that really was an obsession I am glad you have it... it guarantees any guitar you make looks as good as it possibly can.
That combined with your skills is the combination I would (and will ;o) want to see in a guitar built for me.
Even more so, it shows you care about what you do and how you do it, with a lot of thought and care.
What more could a customer wish for ? ... again, not that it matters, but you sure have my blessings and consent 👌🏻👍🎸
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  #30  
Old 07-30-2019, 04:03 PM
GeoffStGermaine GeoffStGermaine is offline
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Mark,
I wouldn't expect any less than the amount of thought you've put into the detail of the heel block where you install the strap button. Impressive.

That's a very cool saw you have there as well. I went and checked it out and it's surprisingly priced. I expected it to cost considerably more.
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