The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-31-2020, 06:44 PM
LeDave LeDave is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 199
Default Great video - action height, intonation, fret buzz and more

This video, despite being 38 minutes long have taught me more than I'll ever learn in a very long time without it. I just started playing guitar a little over a month ago and I'm grateful for landing on this one.



Thought I'd like to share because it's been so dang helpful.
__________________
Fender California Series Redondo Player (Natural)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-31-2020, 08:41 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,381
Default

Uhm, the white thing that gets removed is called a saddle. The dark thing it sits in is called a bridge. The rest of the video is similarly accurate. There are far better sources of information.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-01-2020, 12:11 PM
rick-slo's Avatar
rick-slo rick-slo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
Posts: 13,564
Default

Decent video, and yes the word "saddle" was used several times, etc.
__________________
Derek Coombs
Website -> Music -> Tabs -> and Youtube
Guitars by Mark Blanchard, Albert&Mueller, Paul Woolson, Collings, Composite Acoustics, and Derek Coombs
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-01-2020, 10:01 PM
LeDave LeDave is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 199
Default

If I were to install a shorter-in-height saddle onto the guitar that already plays good, chances are I'll need to do a truss rod adjustment of lefty loosy rather than a righty tighty, right? My action is a bit too high, I fear for more stress and wear on the bridge than needed.
__________________
Fender California Series Redondo Player (Natural)

Last edited by LeDave; 08-01-2020 at 10:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-02-2020, 01:10 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,381
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeDave View Post
If I were to install a shorter-in-height saddle onto the guitar that already plays good, chances are I'll need to do a truss rod adjustment of lefty loosy rather than a righty tighty, right? My action is a bit too high, I fear for more stress and wear on the bridge than needed.
No.

The adjustable truss rod is there to adjust the bow in the neck - "relief". It is not there to raise and lower action. The bow in the neck should be set appropriately, then the string height set at the nut and saddle. It often happens that excessive string height is the result of too much bow and is "fixed" by adjusting it to a suitable amount. Typical amounts of relief are between about .005" and .01".

If the action is too high, look to lowering the strings at the nut and/or saddle.

The action is largely unrelated to the "stress and wear" on the bridge. If the angle the strings break over the saddle is very large, that increases the tipping force on the saddle, which can lead to cracking of the ends of the saddle slot at the sound hole side of the slot. "Very large" is having more than about 3/16" of saddle projecting from the top of the bridge.

The greater the vertical distance - from the surface of the guitar top to the bottom of the strings - of the strings at the bridge, the greater the moment/torque on the bridge. For many guitars, the target vertical distance is about 1/2". Unless you have significantly more than that, it isn't an issue to be concerned with.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-02-2020, 10:07 AM
LeDave LeDave is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
No.

The adjustable truss rod is there to adjust the bow in the neck - "relief". It is not there to raise and lower action. The bow in the neck should be set appropriately, then the string height set at the nut and saddle. It often happens that excessive string height is the result of too much bow and is "fixed" by adjusting it to a suitable amount. Typical amounts of relief are between about .005" and .01".

If the action is too high, look to lowering the strings at the nut and/or saddle.

The action is largely unrelated to the "stress and wear" on the bridge. If the angle the strings break over the saddle is very large, that increases the tipping force on the saddle, which can lead to cracking of the ends of the saddle slot at the sound hole side of the slot. "Very large" is having more than about 3/16" of saddle projecting from the top of the bridge.

The greater the vertical distance - from the surface of the guitar top to the bottom of the strings - of the strings at the bridge, the greater the moment/torque on the bridge. For many guitars, the target vertical distance is about 1/2". Unless you have significantly more than that, it isn't an issue to be concerned with.
So complicated. Thanks. I just decided to keep my guitar as is. It sounds good enough already. Only thing I'll change is the bridge pins, which I'll buy and not change until I change my strings in a few months.
__________________
Fender California Series Redondo Player (Natural)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-02-2020, 10:45 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,381
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeDave View Post
So complicated.
Actually, it really isn't very complicated.

This might help, an article I wrote on basic guitar setup: http://charlestauber.com/luthier/Res...May%202015.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-02-2020, 04:44 PM
HodgdonExtreme HodgdonExtreme is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,568
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeDave View Post
Thanks. I just decided to keep my guitar as is. It sounds good enough already.
Sound/tone is mostly unrelated to ease of play - "playability" of a guitar. A properly set-up guitar should be a joy to play, and should allow you to fret notes easily, enhancing your ability to create your sound.

The amount of force required of your index finger to barre all 6 strings, as required for a barre chord, should not be difficult. With just a weeks "strength training" you should be able to play a 4-5 minute song, comprised of all barre chords without getting tired or cramping.

Additionally, the grip strength or force required to fret that barre chord should be just as easy on the 1st fret (for your F major) as it is up higher on the neck...

Properly done, the guitar should play easily and not buzz.

In my opinion, the guitar being set up nicely for you has a HUGE impact on the enjoyment you get out of playing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Actually, it really isn't very complicated.

This might help, an article I wrote on basic guitar setup: http://charlestauber.com/luthier/Res...May%202015.pdf
^This guy provides fantastic advice here on the forum regarding how to get your guitar working properly. When he chimes in - PAY ATTENTION!
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Thread Tools





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=