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  #16  
Old 09-21-2021, 07:47 AM
Ken Carr Ken Carr is offline
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I talked with her a couple of days ago. She told me that classical guitars is what they specialize in. But she builds crossovers for jazz players usually, upon request with 1 7/8" nut, and 14 frets to the body, based off of their classical concert guitar body designs. I do have a question for you classical guys who have more experience with classical than I. Do you think a classical guitar with standard 2" nut width would feel more usable for a steel string player if the neck profile is a shallow c-shape, and 16" radius? Would you prefer 2" nut, skinny neck, or 1 7/8"nut, thick neck, and flat fretboard?
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  #17  
Old 09-21-2021, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Ken Carr View Post
I talked with her a couple of days ago. She told me that classical guitars is what they specialize in. But she builds crossovers for jazz players usually, upon request with 1 7/8" nut, and 14 frets to the body, based off of their classical concert guitar body designs. I do have a question for you classical guys who have more experience with classical than I. Do you think a classical guitar with standard 2" nut width would feel more usable for a steel string player if the neck profile is a shallow c-shape, and 16" radius? Would you prefer 2" nut, skinny neck, or 1 7/8"nut, thick neck, and flat fretboard?
I'm the most comfortable on a shallow C flat 2" board.....dependent on the "factory" string spacing at the nut, I may have a new nut cut to widen slightly. I have pretty small hands too. What some don't understand is that if you have small hands, the "attack angle" of your fingers coming up over the board is more shallow, and more space between strings can be a benefit. If you have long, thin "Hendrix" fingers, you can come on a higher angle and put them in a more specific place.

I''m not sure I'd want a radiused neck on a classical (even full 52mm) but I've never tried one either I've literally become most comfortable on my classical than my custom steel strings.
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  #18  
Old 09-21-2021, 11:12 AM
AndreF AndreF is offline
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Do you think a classical guitar with standard 2" nut width would feel more usable for a steel string player if the neck profile is a shallow c-shape, and 16" radius?
No, I personally don't. But you'd likely encounter a wide range of opinions, based on people's preferences, and none of them would necessarily be wrong.
Keep in mind too that many posters here, including myself, play both steel and classical guitars, and can switch back and forth without feeling any discomfort.
My feeling is: Being a steel string "1 3/4" player, or having "small hands", has nothing to do with being uncomfortable when suddenly switching to a 2" flat fretboard classical guitar.
It has everything to do with adapting your technique to play that guitar. Once you become technically more familiar and adept with the new neck dimensions, geometry and fatter nylon strings, you start to actually like it, and appreciate the roominess. Little children can learn to play on classical necks.
So, be mindful that what you experienced at trying out a "new to you" 2" classical neck may not be at all how you might feel about it in the future once you've gotten the hang of it.
And it works both ways that way.
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Would you prefer 2" nut, skinny neck, or 1 7/8"nut, thick neck, and flat fretboard?
Not a big fan of skinny necks, on any guitar. I think a typical 2" classical neck (shallow C or D) works best for what I play.
You might have different sensibilities though If your intent is just to play on nylon what you currently play on steel. That’s an important consideration too.
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Last edited by AndreF; 09-21-2021 at 02:31 PM. Reason: corrected an illegible sentence. :)
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  #19  
Old 09-30-2021, 12:27 PM
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. Also, I have a steel string guitar that I love that was built by now retired luthier, Del Langejans. He used to build classical guitars as well as steel string. I see one of his for sale every once in a while. I am also considering that, but that would cost me a little more than 3k.

Sent you a PM a few days ago, but you may not have seen it...

https://www.elderly.com/collections/...classical-1989
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  #20  
Old 09-30-2021, 08:22 PM
Ken Carr Ken Carr is offline
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Fitness 1 thank you. That Langejans classical looks nice. The only thing that would scare me away is the 53mm nut width. As of right now, I am planning on meeting with Donna Loprinzi in two weeks to discuss a crossover build.
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