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  #16  
Old 01-17-2019, 02:49 PM
try2makeit try2makeit is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie Voltaire View Post
To me, spending money on a guitar that serves the exact same purpose as another becomes akin to just "acquiring things," which I always endeavor to avoid -- although not always successfully!
I think that's really how I feel here. My S&P covers just about everything I can think of doing right now. The Yamaha is essentially the fun little couch guitar that I've really enjoyed playing. I thought about getting more of a dreadnaught shape like the bass response so much, but they are so uncomfortable to me I think it would just end up most of the time in the case or on a stand.
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  #17  
Old 01-17-2019, 02:54 PM
merlin666 merlin666 is offline
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Well you only live once and if you always wanted a cedar topped S&P and you love the size, and you have the spare cash then sure go for it. On a more practical side, you only have two hands and can only play one guitar at a time. So ask yourself if there is a serious gap in your repertoire that the guitar needs to fill? With multiple guitars there also comes maintenance, string changes, they use up space, .... most people end up playing the only guitars they NEED to play their songs, those that they just wanted to scratch an itch at some point will then sit around unused.
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  #18  
Old 01-17-2019, 03:33 PM
try2makeit try2makeit is offline
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Something that is kind of funny is I won a Breedlove guitar about two years ago. It was pursuit series and had solid hog over lam hog. I was so excited to get it because I'd never won anything and was excited about trying an all hog guitar. It was a nice guitar, but didn't sound very different than my MJ. A lady at church is a music teach in the local county schools and I ended up giving it to this kid that she had that couldn't afford one. He loved it and has it to this day. Plays it almost every day. This kid has zero interest in acquiring more guitars and just wants to get better and it seems to have really changed his life. It just makes me think that's what it's all about, you know?
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  #19  
Old 01-17-2019, 04:25 PM
zmf zmf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by try2makeit View Post
..... and I ended up giving it to this kid that she had that couldn't afford one. He loved it and has it to this day. Plays it almost every day. .... It just makes me think that's what it's all about, you know?


Yeah. I think you have the right perspective.
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  #20  
Old 01-17-2019, 06:07 PM
Woolbury Woolbury is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by try2makeit View Post
I think that's really how I feel here. My S&P covers just about everything I can think of doing right now. The Yamaha is essentially the fun little couch guitar that I've really enjoyed playing. I thought about getting more of a dreadnaught shape like the bass response so much, but they are so uncomfortable to me I think it would just end up most of the time in the case or on a stand.
In spite of me encouraging the cedar guitar, and I really intend to get one at some point, I like a lot of diversity in my guitars. My Martin strums and plays the bluegrass stuff, my Collings is more modern finger style oriented, my Gibson roots blues. I like guitars that take me down different roads. I'd like a cedar, a resonator(love Mike Dowlings jazzy sounds), if I found a guitar that I preferred to one of my core group Id probably sell one. Too many styles to pursue, an archtop, nylon string, a uke...
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  #21  
Old 01-17-2019, 06:47 PM
buddyhu buddyhu is offline
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I think it depends on what you want (and can afford).

I had one (inexpensive, but completely satisfactory) Yamaha guitar for 20 years. Then I decided to buy a nicer guitar, and bought a Taylor. And then a Guild 12 string.

Having those nicer guitars very much increased the pleasure I got from playing. That was my stable for another 15 years.

Then I started taking fingerpicking lessons, and enjoyed playing even more, and decided to start exploring even nicer guitars. Soon, I had two guitars that were close to identical, except they were in different woods (mahogany and cedar vs EIR and spruce), and one had a cutaway. And I really enjoyed both for 6 or 7 years, until I sold one of them last Spring. Also bought a few other guitars in the past 5 years to hear different woods, hear different sizes, try different makers.

It has been great fun, and it hasn’t cost me much money to have these guitar adventures. I have usually bought used instruments, sometimes buy a guitar that is on sale for some reason (got a nice Martin 11 years for very cheap due to a “scratch and dent sale” at Musicians Friend).

Do I have more guitars than I need? Yes. Do my various guitars serve different functions? 75% of them do, the rest are pretty redundant, functionally speaking.

If I were you, I might be thinking about getting a nicer guitar instead of another S&P with a cedar top. But if you like the price and want to try a cedar top, and aren’t over-extending financially, there’s little potential for harm in buying the same guitarvin different woods: worse thing that happens is you are disappointed, and sell the guitar for a bit less than you paid. It’s not like you are betting your rent money on the Super Bowl.
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  #22  
Old 01-17-2019, 07:23 PM
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chippygreen chippygreen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woolbury View Post
So not only a new voice, it may encourage a new direction in songs or a new way to play songs you already play. I don't own a cedar top yet, but I will at some point.
+ 1 on this. With my two most recent acquisitions, after initially trying to adapt the guitar to my playing style, I eventually evolved to adapting my playing style to each guitar's strengths, and found myself re-voicing songs and trying new chord variations, as well as improvising melodies inspired by the new tones and colors. I also discovered that I enjoy playing certain songs more on certain guitars. Sort of a high class problem to have, and you have to decide if what you get out of it is worth what it costs, but the experience described above resonates with me.
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  #23  
Old 01-17-2019, 07:51 PM
sdelsolray sdelsolray is offline
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I've had two (one time three) guitars from the same builder, same body style, etc., at the same time, but with different woods. In that limited experience, I noticed many behavioral aspects were similar or identical and I noticed that some sonic aspects were a bit different. I concluded the builder and design has more to do with things than anything else.
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  #24  
Old 01-17-2019, 08:13 PM
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fazool fazool is offline
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I'm very much in this boat. In fact I may pull the trigger on a custom shop for just this purpose
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  #25  
Old 01-17-2019, 08:56 PM
rwmct rwmct is offline
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Lots of people will buy essentially the same guitar in different woods. Rosewood and hog and maybe maple, for example.
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  #26  
Old 01-17-2019, 09:51 PM
Cool555 Cool555 is offline
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Default Thoughts on getting the same guitar, but with different tonewoods

Quote:
Originally Posted by try2makeit View Post
Something that is kind of funny is I won a Breedlove guitar about two years ago. It was pursuit series and had solid hog over lam hog. I was so excited to get it because I'd never won anything and was excited about trying an all hog guitar. It was a nice guitar, but didn't sound very different than my MJ. A lady at church is a music teach in the local county schools and I ended up giving it to this kid that she had that couldn't afford one. He loved it and has it to this day. Plays it almost every day. This kid has zero interest in acquiring more guitars and just wants to get better and it seems to have really changed his life. It just makes me think that's what it's all about, you know?


I like your story of giving your guitar to this kid in need!

In the end, its your call. Are you using the guitars to play at home? Play in church or gigs? You enjoy having many guitars? You find taking care of many guitars a hassle? Rhetorical questions only.

For myself right now, I like to have a variety of tonewoods. Just to play and hear different tones for different moods.

Just my 2 cents.
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Last edited by Cool555; 01-18-2019 at 12:57 AM.
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  #27  
Old 01-18-2019, 10:49 AM
woodbox woodbox is offline
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Default Twice times 3

I have twice had 3 guitars that were the same model made from different wood combinations.

Some years ago, I simultaneously had 3 of the Martin "Women and Music" series.
-Rosewood/Sitka
-Maple/Sitka
-Mahogany/Mahogany
Same everything except wood.
(the tuners were different on the Mahogany model)

And another time I simultaneously had 3 Taylors of the 14, or GA, body style.
--Rosewood/Cedar
--Koa/Sitka
--Sapele/Sitka

And yes, the sound was (predictably) different with each guitar in the group, even though the builder and body shape/size was identical.

In both of these situations, it was more a curious game of acquisitions, rather than trying to find "my guitar".
I have a buddy who has 8 motorcycles in his garage (does a guy really need 3 Harleys?) and another who has a dozen sets of golf clubs...
my obsession was guitars.

To the OP, this can be a fun adventure.
But to quote you:
"Maybe I do need to just stop and be happy with what I've got..."
There is wisdom in your words.

But then, if a new guitar makes you smile, and you are current on the rent and utility bills, why not?

Last edited by woodbox; 01-18-2019 at 11:02 AM.
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