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  #31  
Old 01-11-2019, 04:30 AM
Otterhound Otterhound is offline
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Originally Posted by Bruce Sexauer View Post
It occurs to me the quartersawing and quartersawn are two entirely different things.
Yes , they are . The confusion happens when people mix the two in common usage and when intended end usages collide . This is far more common than most would think .
Terminology is exactly that .
In the fence industry 2 1/2" pipe is a totally different thing from 2 1/2" pipe in plumbing . Same terminology , different application . Outside diameter versus inside diameter . This is only one of many examples .
Gaining clarity on these things is far more important than the argument over who is right and who is wrong .
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  #32  
Old 01-11-2019, 09:47 AM
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justonwo justonwo is offline
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Originally Posted by Otterhound View Post
Quarter sawing as well as rift sawing are processes .
Quartersawn is an end product that can be derived in 3 basic ways . Those 3 ways are quartersawing , rift sawing and flat sawing .
The quarter sawn piece derived from flat sawn will com from the center piece/s only . The quartersawing process will yield true quartersawn product from each of the first cuts from each quarter . Riftsawing will yield only quartersawn product .
Depending on where you are any who you learned from , the term of rift meaning 30-75 degrees to vertical may be called a b*****d cut . The *astar* cut is the term that I learned in the beginning . The term of rift wasn't even used .
This terminology can get very confusing when one or more parties prefer to argue instead of communicate . This can be very frustrating at times .
Of course , communication is the key and that means not arguing terminology at times . With a group of individuals that typically identifies luthiers , this can be very difficult to accomplish .
I saw that Bruce chimed in here . Ask him about our discussion about Catalpa if you get the chance . We both knew that we were right and it turned out that we both were , even though his Catalpa had a greenish hue to it mine tended towards red .
Find common ground and meet there .
Perfect. NOW I get it. Thanks for the explanation. This makes total sense to me.
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  #33  
Old 01-11-2019, 10:09 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Perhaps we should use the common term “vertical grain” that signifies the end grain orientation, rather than the term “quartersawn” that can be confused with how the log is sawn.
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  #34  
Old 01-11-2019, 10:41 AM
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justonwo justonwo is offline
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Perhaps we should use the common term “vertical grain” that signifies the end grain orientation, rather than the term “quartersawn” that can be confused with how the log is sawn.
That would make more sense, but the entrenched traditional usage is here to stay I suspect.
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  #35  
Old 01-11-2019, 03:00 PM
thomasfelty thomasfelty is offline
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Quarter sawn lumber refers to the angle at which the tree's growth rings intersect the face of the sawn board. Although there are differing opinions on the term, fully quarter sawn lumber is generally defined as growth rings that are 80 to 90 degrees to the face of the board.

Rift sawn lumber is usually used with oak to avoid the flecks that are common in the species. The annular rings or a rift sawn board are about 30-60 degrees to the face of the board, but 45 degrees is the most optimum
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  #36  
Old 01-11-2019, 03:09 PM
Otterhound Otterhound is offline
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Originally Posted by justonwo View Post
Perfect. NOW I get it. Thanks for the explanation. This makes total sense to me.
Pray for clarity ! Do it now ! The bottom line is that when you find yourself thinking that I make total sense you need professional help ASAP .
Thanks .
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