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  #31  
Old 11-02-2019, 11:22 PM
Hasbro Hasbro is offline
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Would this mean that you could purchase a single neck? I've been wanting a modified low oval neck to put into a kalamazoo...
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  #32  
Old 11-03-2019, 01:30 AM
Neil K Walk Neil K Walk is offline
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Originally Posted by Hasbro View Post
Would this mean that you could purchase a single neck? I've been wanting a modified low oval neck to put into a kalamazoo...
Yes. I went to the GMC and all sorts of parts were available in various configurations.
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  #33  
Old 11-03-2019, 08:16 AM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
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I did not know this, thanks for sharing it. For those who've built one of these, how ready for assembly are the kits? If a person has basic tools (files, saws, reamers, clamps, sander, router, assorted drill bits, press) and titebond hideglue, can it be done or is there major work/specialized tools required? Anyone know how the Martin kit compares to StewMac, Saga, IV, etc.? Thanks!
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  #34  
Old 11-03-2019, 09:25 AM
Treenewt Treenewt is online now
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
While guitar making is a subset of woodworking, as you've discovered, guitar making involves some unique issues not usually addressed in general woodworking.
10000000 percent agree Charles! I learned the hard way! The tolerances and skill required are WAY above my pay grade! Mad respect for you and all the luthiers out there. Amazing skills required!
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  #35  
Old 11-03-2019, 06:45 PM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is online now
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Originally Posted by Mandobart View Post
I did not know this, thanks for sharing it. For those who've built one of these, how ready for assembly are the kits? If a person has basic tools (files, saws, reamers, clamps, sander, router, assorted drill bits, press) and titebond hideglue, can it be done or is there major work/specialized tools required? Anyone know how the Martin kit compares to StewMac, Saga, IV, etc.? Thanks!
They are pretty well together - pre-bent sides, top is together with rosette installed, you have to glue up the back, fretboard is slotted, neck is pretty well roughed out.

If you’re going to do more than one I’d recommend buying or making a body mold - this holds the sides while the head and tail blocks are glued in, kerfing is installed, and some other operations. Trickiest part for me has been cutting the binding ledges and the finishing process. Setting the neck dovetail is a bit of work but patience and attention to detail will get you there.

You’re going to need more clamps, no matter how many you already have.

I’ve only used the Martin kits. You can download the StewMac kit instructions from their site. I did and it was a useful reference.

There are a number of good online resources for kit building, both forums and YouTube videos.
I studied forums and written resources for a year before finally stepping in. My 2nd guitar is about to enter the finishing process and a third is waiting its turn. Maybe one more kit after that, then I’m on to scratch builds.

Last edited by Skarsaune; 11-03-2019 at 06:50 PM. Reason: More info.
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  #36  
Old 11-03-2019, 07:24 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Originally Posted by Mandobart View Post
titebond hideglue
The collective experience of guitar makers over the last few decades has been very inconsistent in the use of titebond liquid hide glue. I'd recommend avoiding its use in guitar construction.

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Originally Posted by Skarsaune View Post

You’re going to need more clamps, no matter how many you already have.
There are many approaches to guitar making. I use relatively few typical woodworking clamps when making guitars, often instead using rubber bands, rope, foam rubber, nuts and bolts and wedges.

Relatively few specialized tools are necessary to make a guitar, however specialized tools, jigs and fixtures can simplify the process, save effort and increase production rates.
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  #37  
Old 11-04-2019, 06:13 AM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is online now
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
Relatively few specialized tools are necessary to make a guitar, however specialized tools, jigs and fixtures can simplify the process, save effort and increase production rates.
Very well stated.
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  #38  
Old 11-04-2019, 06:47 AM
RedJoker RedJoker is offline
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When a buddy of mine found out he was going to have a son, his wife was getting all kinds of gifts. Spa days, massages, things like that. I decided he needed a gift so I bought him one of these kits to work on until his son was born.

Long story short, the wrong neck was shipped with the kit and he had to do a TON of work to get it to work. He's even hired a luthier for a few items. He's now got the finish done and ready for final assembly. He hopes to have it done by the end of the year.

Oh, and his son is now 17.
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  #39  
Old 11-04-2019, 08:55 AM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
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For a first build, I recommend Titebond Original. IMHO, using Titebond liquid hide glue (or any similar product) is unnecessarily risky. I have heard way too many failure stories.
Also, I do not recommend Titebond II or Titebond III.
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  #40  
Old 11-04-2019, 09:09 AM
redir redir is offline
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Congrats to those in this tread who built some nice looking guitars from kits. Some very fine examples there. I've seen some in person that were terrible and some that were done well. It's all about having fun. Just don't buy a kit thinking that you are saving money on a nice hand made guitar. It's more like when you were a kid and you used to buy those model airplanes and ships and glue them all together and paint them up.

For anyone considering getting into luthiery as a hobby I guess starting off with a kit is a good thing to do. I tend to steer people like that away from kits and instead just diving right in and start making mistakes.

But the kits are fun and in the end even if it looks like a disaster you have a guitar.
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  #41  
Old 11-04-2019, 09:35 AM
hat hat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redir View Post
Congrats to those in this tread who built some nice looking guitars from kits. Some very fine examples there. I've seen some in person that were terrible and some that were done well. It's all about having fun. Just don't buy a kit thinking that you are saving money on a nice hand made guitar. It's more like when you were a kid and you used to buy those model airplanes and ships and glue them all together and paint them up.

For anyone considering getting into luthiery as a hobby I guess starting off with a kit is a good thing to do. I tend to steer people like that away from kits and instead just diving right in and start making mistakes.

But the kits are fun and in the end even if it looks like a disaster you have a guitar.
But the flip side of that is if you take your time, pay attention, and follow the instructions, you can have a guitar that you can be proud to show to others, and play yourself. It's not rocket science, there are no 'hidden magic tricks' that professionals use that are hidden from us mere mortals, and firstly - BELIEVE IN YOURSELF!
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  #42  
Old 11-18-2019, 02:26 PM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is online now
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In case anyone is considering a kit purchase, I just received the email from Martin.
Their Rosewood and Sipo kits are 25% off until 11/22.

Come on in, the water's fine!
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  #43  
Old 11-18-2019, 02:50 PM
JonWint JonWint is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skarsaune View Post
In case anyone is considering a kit purchase, I just received the email from Martin.
Their Rosewood and Sipo kits are 25% off until 11/22.

Come on in, the water's fine!
Take 20% more off if you are a MOC member. That would be $312 for a RW D Herringbone or $390 for a D-41.
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  #44  
Old 11-18-2019, 03:01 PM
Skarsaune Skarsaune is online now
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Yup. That’s why I joined MOC.
The discount on a kit is more than the membership fee, and you get the membership benefits besides.
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  #45  
Old 11-18-2019, 08:40 PM
1833 1833 is offline
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Originally Posted by JonWint View Post
Take 20% more off if you are a MOC member. That would be $312 for a RW D Herringbone or $390 for a D-41.
I have not been able to get my MOC discount on items that are already marked down I just tried it on the kit to see if they will give me my Martins Owners Club discount and it did show the discounted price . That is a super deal . I did not order it but did put it in my cart just to see if they would give the additional discount and they did . Joe R

Last edited by 1833; 11-18-2019 at 08:47 PM.
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