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  #16  
Old 08-14-2020, 07:50 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Originally Posted by Rudy4 View Post
I've been using Osmo Poly-x for necks with great results.
At last year's local woodshow, I spent 1/2 hour with a representative from Osmo demonstrating their products. While I liked the result, I found the knock-my-head-back smell of the product during application to be so overpowering that it eliminated the product as a choice for me. What has been your experience with the smell?

By contrast, I spent 15 minutes with a rep from Oddies Oil, a product with almost no smell and zero VOC, one that one can eat. (I suspect, based on the smell, that it is at least partially neem oil.) I've since used Oddies Oil on a few cutting boards and a writing desk. Easy, easy, easy to apply, no odour, won't water mark after fully cured in a few weeks. One uses minuscule amounts of the oil, unlike typical penetrating oil finishes. I've not tried it on guitars, but it could be a viable finish, depending on what appearance one wants. I think it would be excellent on dulcimers and similar folk instruments. The gloss of the finish is largely dependent upon how finely the underlying wood is sanded and will produce a nice lustre, but not a high gloss. Probably won't work well over filled pores.

Last edited by charles Tauber; 08-15-2020 at 07:10 AM.
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  #17  
Old 08-14-2020, 10:48 PM
lar lar is offline
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Originally Posted by redir View Post
The word varnish is complicated too.
Yes it is. Here is what what Wiki says about the term 'varnish'

The term "varnish" refers to the finished appearance of the product. It is not a term for any single or specific chemical composition or formula. There are many different compositions that achieve a varnish effect when applied. A distinction between spirit-drying (and generally removable) "lacquers" and chemical-cure "varnishes" (generally thermosets containing "drying" oils) is common, but varnish is a broad term historically and the distinction is not strict.
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  #18  
Old 08-15-2020, 06:43 AM
seangil seangil is offline
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Default Osmo

I don't know about the smell of Osmo. I found one maker who talks about using the product on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzNxw4zmZuc

Not sure if this helps any.
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  #19  
Old 08-15-2020, 07:48 AM
Rudy4 Rudy4 is offline
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Originally Posted by charles Tauber View Post
At last year's local woodshow, I spent 1/2 hour with a representative from Osmo demonstrating their products. While I liked the result, I found the knock-my-head-back smell of the product during application to be so overpowering that it eliminated the product as a choice for me. What has been your experience with the smell?

By contrast, I spent 15 minutes with a rep from Oddies Oil, a product with almost no smell and zero VOC, one that one can eat. (I suspect, based on the smell, that it is at least partially neem oil.) I've since used Oddies Oil on a few cutting boards and a writing desk. Easy, easy, easy to apply, no odour, won't water mark after fully cured in a few weeks. One uses minuscule amounts of the oil, unlike typical penetrating oil finishes. I've not tried it on guitars, but it could be a viable finish, depending on what appearance one wants. I think it would be excellent on dulcimers and similar folk instruments. The gloss of the finish is largely dependent upon how finely the underlying wood is sanded and will produce a nice lustre, but not a high gloss. Probably won't work well over filled pores.
Your reaction to the smell of the Osmo product are very interesting. I don't know about their full product line but I found the Osmo Poly-X to have a very low odor intensity and what was detectable was unusual, but pleasant.

I know 3 or 4 other small shop builders who have had the same positive experience with the Poly-X satin product.

I've also used Rubio Monocoat (the same class of product) and it did have a slightly stronger smell, but not what I would consider objectionable. The Osmo "cured" faster than the Rubio product and the residual odor disappeared within 24 hours of application.

I've read other positive reviews of Oddie's Oil and may try it in the future, but the Osmo Poly-X really satisfies my requirements.

I'm always on the lookout for a protective finish for necks that satisfied the requirements of sealing & protection without any residual grab or stickiness and the Osmo Poly-X does that for me.

This stuff is EXPENSIVE, but worth the price. It's available in small cans, but it goes a long way. The exact formula I'm using is "Osmo PolyX Oil High Solid #3054 Clear Satin for wood floors and furniture".

These "hard oil" products are unusual in the sense that you can't "build" a finish. The Rubio Monocoat instructions plainly state that it is impossible to add a second coat. Anything beyond the initial coat will not bond to a previous coat, so you simply waste product by attempting to apply additional coats. When they say "monocoat" they mean it.

The Osmo PolyX instructions call for 2 coats, and that seemed to be the optimum in my case.

Last edited by Rudy4; 08-15-2020 at 08:33 AM.
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  #20  
Old 08-15-2020, 09:21 AM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Originally Posted by seangil View Post
I don't know about the smell of Osmo. I found one maker who talks about using the product on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzNxw4zmZuc

Not sure if this helps any.
Sure, it is helpful.

Josh's Part 1 of the application also gives his impression of Tru-Oil and why he prefers Osmo.

I know Josh and he's very approachable. If you have any questions regarding the application, I'm sure he'd be very helpful.
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  #21  
Old 08-15-2020, 02:16 PM
seangil seangil is offline
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Default Osmo

Rudy - have you used Osmo on anything other than necks?
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  #22  
Old 08-15-2020, 02:30 PM
Stromberg Voisi Stromberg Voisi is offline
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Originally Posted by Rudy4 View Post

The exact formula I'm using is "Osmo PolyX Oil High Solid #3054 Clear Satin for wood floors and furniture".

These "hard oil" products are unusual in the sense that you can't "build" a finish. The Rubio Monocoat instructions plainly state that it is impossible to add a second coat. Anything beyond the initial coat will not bond to a previous coat, so you simply waste product by attempting to apply additional coats. When they say "monocoat" they mean it.

The Osmo PolyX instructions call for 2 coats, and that seemed to be the optimum in my case.
Doesn't the last sentence contradict what came before it?
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  #23  
Old 08-15-2020, 03:40 PM
charles Tauber charles Tauber is offline
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Originally Posted by Stromberg Voisi View Post
Doesn't the last sentence contradict what came before it?
Two different products by two different manufacturers. One recommends two coats, the other is impossible to add more than one coat.
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