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  #31  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:13 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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When did you sell your '73 Les Paul Custom? Do you regret it because of what you might get today for it or because it was a great playing Les Paul?
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  #32  
Old 12-23-2019, 11:15 AM
Lkristians Lkristians is offline
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I sold it around 75 or 76 because I needed the money. I don't care about the current value, but would have liked to have a high quality electric. I currently have a PRS and a Strat (Mexican), but they ain't a Les Paul Custom!
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  #33  
Old 12-23-2019, 12:30 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Okay, so a few have come and gone. But the important players have stayed. Back in the fall of 1977 I was offered a slot in a pretty hot band and needed a serious guitar. I'd been saving for years to get a wine red Les Paul but at the time, all I could afford was this:



I bought it at pick n' Grin in Knoxville, TN. It's an odd bird: a 1974 Les Paul Standard built in Kalamazoo before the LP Standard line was officially launched. The story was that Les Paul went to Gibson in 1966 when he heard that the Les Pauls from the '50s were rocketing up in price and said they ought to start making them again. The only problem is that there really hadn't been a regular LP configuration. They took a shot and started making them with P-90 pickups. People started clamoring for LPs with humbuckers so they took a bunch of mini humbuckers left over from the acquisition of Epiphone and stuck them in the slots for the P-90s. The public still clamored and said, "No, no, no!!! Give us a standard Les Paul with full-sized humbuckers!" So, in 1973 they began making a handful of these and fulfilling requests from dealers. By 1975 they decided to make it official and in 1976 they opened the new Nashville plant with its inaugural product being the new Les Paul Standard. There were some changes from the old pattern (maple necks, metal jack plates, etc.). But this little handful of Kalamazoo-built guitars are slightly different and have a smaller font size on their truss rod covers.

This one has played on so many gigs and sessions it it deeply ingrained in me. It's not going anywhere.

Bob
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  #34  
Old 12-23-2019, 12:46 PM
Lkristians Lkristians is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Womack View Post
Okay, so a few have come and gone. But the important players have stayed. Back in the fall of 1977 I was offered a slot in a pretty hot band and needed a serious guitar. I'd been saving for years to get a wine red Les Paul but at the time, all I could afford was this:



I bought it at pick n' Grin in Knoxville, TN. It's an odd bird: a 1974 Les Paul Standard built in Kalamazoo before the LP Standard line was officially launched. The story was that Les Paul went to Gibson in 1966 when he heard that the Les Pauls from the '50s were rocketing up in price and said they ought to start making them again. The only problem is that there really hadn't been a regular LP configuration. They took a shot and started making them with P-90 pickups. People started clamoring for LPs with humbuckers so they took a bunch of mini humbuckers left over from the acquisition of Epiphone and stuck them in the slots for the P-90s. The public still clamored and said, "No, no, no!!! Give us a standard Les Paul with full-sized humbuckers!" So, in 1973 they began making a handful of these and fulfilling requests from dealers. By 1975 they decided to make it official and in 1976 they opened the new Nashville plant with its inaugural product being the new Les Paul Standard. There were some changes from the old pattern (maple necks, metal jack plates, etc.). But this little handful of Kalamazoo-built guitars are slightly different and have a smaller font size on their truss rod covers.

This one has played on so many gigs and sessions it it deeply ingrained in me. It's not going anywhere.

Bob
Boy, that's a beauty, no matter how you slice it! I don't know if you're familiar with Andy on "Shut up and Play" tutorials, but his LP is that wine color, I believe. Stunning. Thanks for the background on yours! Still wish I had mine back!
Best,
LarryK
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  #35  
Old 12-23-2019, 01:01 PM
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Ozarkpicker Ozarkpicker is offline
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Iíve had two...during my absolutely insane GAS period.

I had an OM-21, and a CS 0000-18. Sold them both in sheer blind fits of madness.

I wish I had them both back...
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  #36  
Old 12-23-2019, 01:25 PM
EllenGtrGrl EllenGtrGrl is offline
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I've had a few:

Acoustics

1. Gibson J-35 Reissue - both of them, and especially the 2017 (the last one I had). The only reason I got rid of that guitar, is because I started playing in a local church band early this year (I NEEDED my band fix - I MISS playing in bands). The music director is fast and loose with the keys songs are played in (being a pianist, she often bases keys around what she likes to play on the piano [which is a Steinway that was donated by a well-to-do couple]), so I often have to resort to cheater/bar chords to get the job done musically. My lovely J-35, just didn't cut it with bar chords - it sounded to me like an oversized ukelele. I decided to go the 12-string route (I used to play 12-strings extensively until several years ago) to fill out the guitar sound a bit. I got a lower cost Seagull Excursion 12-string, as a musical experiment, and when that worked, took a deep breath, and traded it, and my J-35 for a Taylor 150e, AND the cost of getting the Taylor 150e refretted. Why did I get the 150e refretted? Well, back in 2014, I was diagnosed with having a severe allergy to nickel (along with a major allergy to chromium [which is used in stainless steel]), so much so, that I get mega skin breakouts, when I have any extended exposure to nickel. This meant no more nickel strings on my electrics, and refretting any guitars I do serious playing on, with hypoallergenic fretwire (Jescar EVO Gold), since virtually all guitars use nickel alloy frets. The Taylor 150e has been a musical success for me (it sounds and plays great), but I still miss my J-35 (but I couldn't afford to get the Taylor any other way at the time).

P.S. - Refretting a guitar isn't cheap (depending upon the guitar, it costs $350-$450), and thanks to the cost of refretting my guitars, cheap guitars are a no go nowadays. I can't justify (unless it's a very special guitar) spending as much or more than the cost of the guitar, to have it refretted.

2. Taylor GS Mini Koa - why did I get rid of mine? Everybody liked the way it looked, and the way it sounded. In retrospect, so did I. I should get another one, though if the Breedlove Pursuit Exotic Concertina that FedEx dropped off 30 minutes ago sounds and plays well (as in the neck ISN'T TOO THIN), that may be a moot point. I will spend some time playing the Breedlove (but not enough, that it's nickel frets cause my dermatitis to flare up), before I decide if I want to proceed with getting another GS Mini.

Electrics

1. 1970s Gibson Les Paul Signature - this was my main electric guitar in the 1980s, when I was a student at the University of Wisconsin. For those who don't know, a Les Paul Signatures is basically an ES-335, with a Les Paul-style lower cutaway, low impedance humbuckers, a phase switch, and a Varitone switch. When I graduated in 1987, I decided that I needed a guitar that better looked the part for playing the heavy rock I was playing at the time - an Explorer. Well, I discovered when I tried one out, that me and Explorers don't mix ergonomically, due to me slinging guitars up high like jazz guitarists do. I was on the verge of calling it quits with getting rid of my Les Paul Signature, when I was offered a straight up trade deal for a superstrat. I ended up realizing a few years later, that superstrats bore me, and I also ended up realizing that I prefer more traditional electric guitars (even for the loud and heavy stuff - a Gibson Howard Roberts Fusion was my main gigging guitar for most of the 90s). To add insult to injury, I found out a few years ago, that Gibson only made 64, Les Paul Signatures with a tobacco sunburst finish, and they are worth at least $20,000. Guess what color mine was - tobacco sunburst!!! Saying I wasn't a happy camper, is an understatement.

2. 2008 Fender Japan, '66 Reissue Jaguar - I miss this one, and I haven't found a Jaguar since then that I liked as much as it. But hey, I was flat broke, and needed the money.

3. Gretsch Country Club - I have a love/hate relationship with Country Clubs. I've had several over the years, and every time I've gotten rid of them, I end up wanting one (again) a few years later. Maybe down the road I'll get another one, or maybe not, since the Heritage H-535 I have nowadays, has left me in a happy place when it comes to hollow and semi-hollow electrics.

Last edited by EllenGtrGrl; 12-24-2019 at 11:14 PM.
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  #37  
Old 12-23-2019, 02:12 PM
RockerDuck RockerDuck is offline
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While I love playing guitars and I've owned over; at least 50, and had 30 at one time, I've never been attached to a piece of wood.
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  #38  
Old 12-24-2019, 06:44 AM
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Shades of Blue Shades of Blue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockerDuck View Post
While I love playing guitars and I've owned over; at least 50, and had 30 at one time, I've never been attached to a piece of wood.


Iím kind of the same way. Iíve never owned 30 at a time, but I donít really miss a guitar once itís gone. Sure there are some I wish Iíd kept, but it isnít like a painful feeling or anything. If anything, I have a couple of electrics that I wish I wasnít so attached to so that I could sell them and buy something else.
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  #39  
Old 12-24-2019, 07:56 AM
personatech personatech is offline
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Around 1980, bought a late-70s Music Man bass for $200, didn't like the active electronics, sold that bass a couple of months later at the same price. Should've kept it.
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  #40  
Old 12-24-2019, 09:33 AM
Texsunburst59 Texsunburst59 is offline
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I learned very early on that you NEVER EVER sell a great sounding/ playing guitar that's proven itself for another guitar with an unproven track record.

To date, I have no regrets for letting can't guitars go.

I was smart enough to to listen and take advice from others who had made these mistakes.
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  #41  
Old 12-24-2019, 10:55 AM
Treenewt Treenewt is offline
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My 2013 Music Villa D-18 custom. Dang that was an amazing instrument. I let it go just over a year ago due to not financial issues, but letís just say emotional ones. It was tied to a very tough period of my life mentally, and I just couldnít deal with it at the time. Now, Iím in a much better space and would LOVE to have it back. Sigh...
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  #42  
Old 12-24-2019, 11:01 AM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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I came by a Martin in a pawn shop about 1982 for $100. Went to check with a guy at work who had one whether what I was seeing was a real Martin or a knockoff with a miss-spelled name. Seemed to be the real thing, gone when I got back there.
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