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  #16  
Old 02-12-2010, 10:29 PM
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TBman TBman is offline
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Thanks for posting this. In a few years when my son is in college, I'll give it a try.
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  #17  
Old 02-19-2010, 09:32 AM
Mike_A Mike_A is offline
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wow! im watching this thread til its completed! this is something i'd want to accomplish too in the future. you're doing a great job, keep it up!
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  #18  
Old 02-19-2010, 10:47 AM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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Thanks Mike A and TBman, I'm kinda stuck right now in the finishing stage. I evidently know less about finishing that I thought. Which wasn't much in the first place. Last night, I got pretty agressive with "levelling" the surface. Prior to that I would just brush off the little nibs and then put on another coat.
But I finally saw small peaks and valleys and decided to scrub a bit harder. Used 320, 400, and 600 grit working with the grain. I was looking for a dull finish across the entire surface.
Ended up with some shiny spots still on each surface, but made great progress. Also, my pore filling was not adequate, and I saw small "dots" or maybe they're "fisheyes" that people refer to. They are pretty evident on the sides now, where before there were a lot of them on the back. I only used 600 on the sides last nite, will use 320, 400, 600 tonite to get it to match up with the back.
Should only be a few more coats this weekend, then I'll let it cure and start polishing next weekend.
No pics to show right now, as the last pic is about as far as I've got.
I appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and good words. It makes me want to keep going and get this finished. I tap the top from time to time. It has a kinda bass sound to it, and a bit of sustain or ringing. I'm hoping that's a good sound to have.
Bob
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  #19  
Old 02-19-2010, 11:23 AM
Fliss Fliss is offline
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Great thread, Bob, thanks so much for sharing your journey. That guitar is looking great!

Fliss
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  #20  
Old 02-23-2010, 09:37 AM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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On Sunday, I put on the last 3 coats of Emtech 6000. I figure all in all there were about 20 coats. However, with some of the sanding, I probably knocked off 6 or so. At any rate, I'm finished with the finish. It's hanging in a closet now until this weekend when I can put some micro mesh on it. Then buff or whatever I need to get it completed. There's still neck work to be done, fret levelling and crowning, put on the bridge. String it up. So close, so close.

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  #21  
Old 02-26-2010, 05:56 PM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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Quick questions as I've already micro-meshed the neck (WOW).
I have some Cut Polish, Fine Polish, and Super Fine Polish from LMI.
Should I run thru them like I did with the micro-mesh papers?
If so, what kind of household fabric could I use? Is an old tee shirt going to scratch the finish?
The rosewood headplate veneer is really shiny, and the headplate sides look soooooooooooooooooooo deep. The back of the neck looks good, but I'm wondering if it could come up a notch with the 3 polishes I mentioned.
Gonna start the body tomorrow.
Thanks for your advice.
Bob
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  #22  
Old 02-27-2010, 07:31 PM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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The Finish is finished. After waiting a week, I was able to polish the guitar. I used micro-mesh all the way thru the grits (9 of them). Then I used the polishes I had bought from LMI. There's still a bit of a haze on it, just ever so slight. Probably because I don't have a buffing wheel and did it by hand. I'm not familiar with the technique, so there's possibly something that I didn't do. At any rate, the thing shines pretty nicely. And I'm happy.
The only thing remaining is to clean up the fretwork, and the fretboard. Then Monday I'll put the bridge down. I have to wait until then because my bridge setting jig won't arrive until that afternoon. Gawd I hate the wait. But hopefully I can string it up Tuesday and let 'er rip.
Also, my Bubinga back and sides arrived. That is an amazing set to me. Hopefully I can get Stephen Kinnaird to look at them next week and tell me if I did good or bad.

Pics below:







Thanks for looking,
Bob
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  #23  
Old 03-02-2010, 03:59 PM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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Received my bridge setting jig from Kenneth Michaels Guitars yesterday. UPS broke it in shipping, but I was able to glue it back together and brace it. Did not knock it out of alignment, which was crucial.
After measuring with Bill Cory's instructions from his book, then measuring with Ken's jig, I came up about 1/4" off in bridge placement. However, I measured, remeasured, and measured again, and they both came out in the same spot. The jig is better for me since it squares up the bridge with it's appropriate distance from the 12th fret. I could do that on my own, but it would take a lot of time and a lot of frustration.
Here's the jig. My picture of it while on the guitar did not come out.



You can read about how it works on his web site. But basically, set the bridge at the end, lining up the center of it with the "V" notch. There's an indexing pin in it that fits the saddle. Secure the sliding carriage up to the bridge and strap it in. Then secure the jig on the neck in the fret slots provided, and velcro it on. Several diamond shaped holes on the jig show you that you are centered on the fretboard. Once set up, drill 2 holes thru the saddle about 1/8" diameter for pins, and 2 in the bridge pin holes of 3/16". This insures that the bridge will be in the same location when you come back to glue it in.
After clinching the location for the bridge, I put bolts down the larger holes, and put in the little pins, then tape around the bridge. Then sanded down the location to bare wood. It might have been better to mask off the bridge's location in the first place, before putting down the finish, but I didn't. Didn't have the jig, and other reasons. I left about 1/8" or less of the finish up under the bridge, so that there's no evidence of bare wood.

Along with that jig, came a bridge clamping tool. It's very similar to those at some of the big vendor stores. Here it is:



I put wax on the 3/16" bolts so they wouldn't stick to the glue. Inserted them thru the previously drilled holes along with the pins in the saddle slot.
Then used wing nuts and washers inside the body to secure them and tighten them up. The 2 bolts on the outer part of the jig are for holding down the wings of the bridge. I put scrap wood held by tape on the bridge wings to protect them, then tightened up all the bolts. The best thing about this clamp is the ability to clean up glue squeeze out easily, as there's no clamp in the way.
By the way, notice the red rag all balled up behind the guitar in this last pic. I got a bunch of those from an auto store. Be careful............until they are washed, they will bleed red on anything they touch. You can guess how I found out about that. Almost had a red spruce top!
I guess I gotta lay this thing up for 24 hours for the glue to set. But there's still a bit of cleaning up on the fretboard between now and then.
I measured from edge of bridge to edge of guitar on both sides. If there was a difference, my poor ole eyes can't see it.
Sooooooooooooooooooo close!!

Thanks for looking,
Bob

Last edited by naccoachbob; 03-02-2010 at 06:00 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-02-2010, 04:16 PM
travisd572 travisd572 is offline
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That looks like so much fun. How much time do you have invested in the guitar Bob?
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  #25  
Old 03-02-2010, 05:12 PM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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It's hard to say. I started Dec 25. So about 2 months. A good bit of time was spent building the mold, jigs, spool clamps, driving to the hardware store, etc.
Bill Cory documents his builds pretty well, and says about 100-120 hours.
Also, I got out of sequence with some things, like fretting the fretboard before doing other things, like inlaying the position markers. It's a bear to sand those things once the frets are on. There were other mistakes made too in the sequence of events.
You can shorten the time by reading up thoroughly on each step before doing it. By checking pages before and after what you're working on, so you don't jump over anything. I sometimes thought I knew what I was doing, but had rushed and got in trouble.
I bet though, that my next one will go a lot faster. Plus there are some things that can be done simultaneously, like working on the neck while the body is clamped up or between finish coats.
Lastly, waiting for things to arrive that you need. My finish was completed Saturday, and I had to wait until today to put on the bridge.
Prior planning and all.
Bob
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  #26  
Old 03-02-2010, 05:22 PM
rlouie rlouie is offline
 
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great job!!!!!!!!!! I'm very impressed!!!!!!!!!
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  #27  
Old 03-02-2010, 05:45 PM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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Thanks, RLouie.
It's been a great ride. Just wanting so bad to unclamp it and string it up.
Folks really need to wait 24 hours for the glue to cure?
Bob
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  #28  
Old 03-06-2010, 06:23 AM
Lodi Ron Lodi Ron is offline
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Very impressive!!
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  #29  
Old 03-09-2010, 08:19 AM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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An update. Strung it up, of course my action is way, way high, but I wanted to hear something.
One thing, when a straightedge is placed down the center of the fretboard, the bottom of it should just lightly kiss the top of the bridge. Anything within 1/32, I think, is good. I had found that spot. But when under string tension, the neck moved slightly, and added to the action's height. Steve Kinnaird caught it for me. I cut some from the bottom of the neck heel to get it right. Now under tension, it's right on. He also helped me with a buzz on the 2nd string, but I have yet to totally get rid of it. That's usually caused by the string laying flat on the nut, with the groove in the nut being level and not angled lower toward the tuners. Even though I keep shaving at an angle, the buzz will not go away. When fretting behind the first fret, it disappears, so it has to be at the nut.
Steve and Ryan both gave me some ideas for lowering the action. I'm just waiting for a measuring device from StewMac to put it in play.
Last thing. The saddle I used was thicker than the slot for it, so I shaved and shaved. Finally going just a bit too far, and it leaned toward the soundhole. Bought another one, and really watched it. Sits fine now.
Waiting for sis-in-law to come to town. She works in the film and tv industry, and is a really good photographer. I'll let her do the glam shots.
Thanks,
Bob
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  #30  
Old 03-15-2010, 08:27 AM
naccoachbob naccoachbob is offline
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Couldn't wait for sister in law, so here are pics of the final product. It won't pass for a "store bought" guitar, but it sounds as good, to me, as a $2000+ Martin, so I'm happy. It sounds good; loud, deep bass tones, bright trebles, and very good sustain.
Unless you look close, you can't see all the mistakes.
I feel like I succeeded in getting what I wanted. Now I'm ready to make some more!! I had a lot of help at the kit forum, and some here too. Really had help from Steve Kinnaird. He and Ryan gave me tips, ideas, encouragement, and compliments on my work. They don't know how much that helped. Thanks Guys!!





Thanks for looking,
Bob
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