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  #16  
Old 01-31-2010, 09:12 PM
OC1 OC1 is offline
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I would not go with cedar for first build - it is so easy to scratch, just put it wrong way on table and ding! You need a good working system before you can go with cedar.

Radius dish is a great helper, you use it for both sanding to radius and as a bed when gluing braces and gluing body. I would really have it imported if you can't find anybody around to make one for you. At least one for the back with like 15" radius. You can sort of get away with flat top. Look on ebay too.
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  #17  
Old 01-31-2010, 09:30 PM
WhistlingFish WhistlingFish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coke_zero View Post
In regards to getting the top and back with a radius, I'm finding this the hardest part so far. I can't justify buying a radius dish as I will have to import it.
If you think have the attitude and aptitude necessary to build a guitar, fabricating a couple of radiused dishes shouldn't be too challenging. There are any number of tutorials around which explain their construction; try plugging "constructing radiused dishes" into Google and you'll find you're swamped with information. Making the dishes is a messy job, but one you only need to face twice. They don't have to be perfect, and just think: the money you save doing it yourself can be "invested" in more wood!
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  #18  
Old 02-01-2010, 08:48 PM
OC1 OC1 is offline
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It is true you can make one, but I think radius disc is one of the few "jigs" that are much more practical to have done by professional shop instead of making giant cloud of dust by yourself. Save your energy for more impoortasnt things, like the guitar.
Even with big chunk for UPS, it is still better to order it. My own opinion.

Most people now make the dishes light from LDF so the shipping is not that huge. Then at home glue it to 2" by 2" MDF so it become rigit and get its weight.
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My Guitars:
-Lucida $60 new with soundport arguably now plays like $85 one
-LaPatrie Presentation, factory rejected
-Takamine AN10
- My own build DeJonge Standard Steel String
- My own build Santos Hernandez cypress flamengo
- My own build Bubinga Tornavoz classical
- My own build Hammered Dulcimer
- My own build Travel Guitar
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2010, 11:28 PM
RMCROSS RMCROSS is offline
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I had a buddy this past year pull off a really nice port\myrtle o-size
It sounded just as good as the walnut\redwood he built if not better.

Last edited by RMCROSS; 02-04-2010 at 11:44 PM.
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  #20  
Old 02-10-2010, 07:50 AM
martinedwards martinedwards is offline
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what no-one has pointed out is that a first build will delight you if it sounds like a GUITAR, forget the idea of different woods sounding different, unless you have a skilled luthier guiding your every move then it won't matter THAT much.

as for the radius dish, you need a load of clamps, right?

just shape your braces and clamp them onto the top/back and they'll pull into the radius.

I've just started #59 and I don't have any dishes.

I made one guitar at a class and used the dishes there, and to be honest, I'm happier without them
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  #21  
Old 02-19-2010, 02:10 PM
arie arie is offline
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Back plate braces: you don't really need a dish. Takes a look here:

http://www.hoffmanguitars.com/back1-111.jpg

http://www.hoffmanguitars.com/bkjg-50.jpg


As for the top, make the guitar flat unless you really need it dished. And one other thing about dishing the top -you'll have to cut a concave hollow under the bridge to match the radius of the top. This hollow will have to be quite exact for maximum energy transfer from the strings to the top.

Go through the rest of Hoffman's site - he has built zillions of guitars and is a master luither.
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  #22  
Old 02-22-2010, 10:09 PM
OC1 OC1 is offline
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This is a pretty nifty jig! I like it!
__________________
My Guitars:
-Lucida $60 new with soundport arguably now plays like $85 one
-LaPatrie Presentation, factory rejected
-Takamine AN10
- My own build DeJonge Standard Steel String
- My own build Santos Hernandez cypress flamengo
- My own build Bubinga Tornavoz classical
- My own build Hammered Dulcimer
- My own build Travel Guitar
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  #23  
Old 02-28-2010, 03:08 PM
smctunes smctunes is offline
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Default Moving right along!

So we have the shop set up, for the most part. So, on to my next question, which concerns the bridge of the guitar.

These are medium-jumbo sized guitars, using the plans from StewMac. On mine, which has an engelmann top and EIR back and sides with a honduran mahogany neck, I have two options for bridge material; ebony or EIR. As I understand it, the bridge dimensions and material can have a huge impact on sound, so I want to be very careful here. My belief is that the ebony bridge would be the better of the two, because the resonance of the EIR, coupled with the sizable body of the guitar will produce a lot of sound, and so the slight deadening effect of the ebony would make it seem like a good pick.

However, this is my first build, so if I'm wrong go ahead and shoot me down!


So, we're adding more lighting tomorrow, but here is my brother showing his son how to use the bench sander ($78 at Harbor Freight!) Don't worry...that's MY beer in the background, not the kid's.
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